Remote hi-hat

Hi!
I`ve been thinking lately that the only time i cross my arms when doing something is when i play my drums and that this is maybe not the ideal way of playing drums. Because of this i have been considering a remote hi-hat.

What are u guys thoughts on using a remote hi-hat as a main hi-hat? And what about placement?


All the best
 

basscase

Senior Member
It is probably better to learn how to play with an open hand technique if you dont want to play traditional, but a remote hat might be the way to go. Remotes are also great for players who use double bass pedals. I have a remote hat that is just set to the closed position that I keep over my floor tom just behind my ride. I dont use double pedals, but I find it easier to use the remote hat sometimes when working with the floor tom a lot. It saves me from having to turn back to my main hats all the time just to return to the floor tom.
 
I see...i tried to put my regular hi-hat in front of my snare drum and if felt deeelish:) It felt really nice not having to cross my arms and I felt my playing got more fluid. But of course it causes a couple of problems:
1. Where do i put my 12 inch tom?
2. Its almost impossible to control my hi-hat with my left leg when placing it in front my snare.

Do u guys know have much a remote hi-hat costs?
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I considered the remote hat for a long time. Mainly, because I was trying to find a way to stuff EVERYTHING into my suitcase for gigging. When I tried them out, though, I found their response to be a little sluggish for my taste. Plus, the attachment pieces for it would be waaaayyyyy to big for me to fit it in the suitcase, so I opted to not buy one. Mostly for the sluggish response.

I DO like the idea of having a pedal to your left that operates something either in front of you or to your right A LOT, but I don't think it would be right for me. Is there a model out there that's more immediately responsive than the DW ones?
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I do not have a remote hi-hat, but I do think it makes sense. A lot of people are playing open handed, meaning that the are basically leading with the left hand when playing a groove. But since the set is still set up right handed, they often perform drum fills using a right hand lead. Most also lead with the right hand on the ride cymbal. That is the puzzling part of open handed playing - switching lead hands. I think that having a remote hi-hat is a better solution if you are intent on not crossing hands.
 

scrowder

Member
Also, if you gig a lot or record, most sound engineers are most familiar and comfortable with mic'ing a kit set up in the standard position. In situations where multiple bands play in one night, moving a hi hat mic to the other side of the drum riser might be a problem, or just a pain in the butt for them. So there's another advantage for being able to play open-handed. Then again...that means LEARNING to play open handed...ughh. The remote does save you some trouble there.
 

sticky.widget

Senior Member
I considered the remote hat for a long time. Mainly, because I was trying to find a way to stuff EVERYTHING into my suitcase for gigging. When I tried them out, though, I found their response to be a little sluggish for my taste. Plus, the attachment pieces for it would be waaaayyyyy to big for me to fit it in the suitcase, so I opted to not buy one. Mostly for the sluggish response.

I DO like the idea of having a pedal to your left that operates something either in front of you or to your right A LOT, but I don't think it would be right for me. Is there a model out there that's more immediately responsive than the DW ones?
I play double bass and bought the Gibraltar Ulta-Adjust Hat Stand in an effort to get my hats closer so I'm not reaching so far because of the slave pedal. The more I play it, the more I hate it. I agree that cable pull vs. direct pull and waaaay to sluggish if you do a lot of hat work.

Thinking of selling it.....and looking for other options.
 

MaDaBe

Member
Very nice set-up MaDaBe! Much like the one i`m thinking about converting to.
What made you go for the remote hat?
I've always kind of disliked playing cross-handed. And I recently decided to go with a no rack toms kit and it just made sense to put the hi hat right in front of me. I had no idea Bruford did this .

The DW remote hat has a fairly wide range of tension adjustments so you can make it sluggish if you want or just as responsive as a regular hi hat. I actually think the DW is better than my previous Tama hi hat stand.

Pearl makes one but it's about as much as the DW. Tama used to make one, Yamaha used to make one and they still might. The Pearl looks pretty cool and I kind of wished I had checked it out before getting the DW.
 

Toby_Jackson

Senior Member
I use the Yamaha remote hat - feel good to me. There's a sense that it may not be quite as responsive as my main, but the difference is slight, and does not affect performance in any way I can detect.

That being said, my remote hat is usually in closed position. It's a lifesaver over on that side of the kit.
 
I like 'em a lot. Being able to put your hats in the center and still reach the pedal is great for fast 16th notes where you need both hands on the hats. It's a tradeoff though; leading with the left makes you more ambidexterous on the kit and opens up things you couldn't play before. But if you've already got that down, definitely get the remotes.
 

BillBachman

Gold Member
Does anyone have problems with the cable breaking? If so does the cable generally break at the top or the bottom? What brand?
 

Pavlos

Senior Member
Hi!
I`ve been thinking lately that the only time i cross my arms when doing something is when i play my drums and that this is maybe not the ideal way of playing drums. Because of this i have been considering a remote hi-hat.

What are u guys thoughts on using a remote hi-hat as a main hi-hat? And what about placement?


All the best
I have one that I mess around with sometimes and use a main hat. Mostly for the same reason that I didn't like crossing my arms either. You can see it in one of my setups in the link in my signature. It's fun and promotes some different thinking in relation to setup, but I don't use it to gig out with. It ultimately ends up being more stuff to carry than just the hi hat stand and is kind of a hassle for quick setup.
 

bonhamdrummer123

Senior Member
I just play open handed with my right leading on the ride when I need it. The only problem I have is my stick control with my left on the snare when I'm on the ride...I don't know why since I use my left exclusively on the hats.....I guess that's why I am doing 4000 single strokes a night with my left hand
 

ace76543

Senior Member
In situations where multiple bands play in one night, moving a hi hat mic to the other side of the drum riser might be a problem, or just a pain in the butt for them.
That's their job, if they don't like it they can quit. You shouldn't not try something just because it might annoy a sound tech. Everything annoys sound techs
 
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