Reducing noise to help with tinnitus

Ahchv

Active member
I have a small amount of tinnitus

As a basement drummer in my mid 30’s I’m very bummed - I protect my ears and don’t wan to stop playing

I do want to make the basement a little less loud - I have some Audimute sheets I’m looking to hang

Based on this photo... any recommendations on what to do to make the space NOT as loud? I don’t want to muffle the tone out of my drums or my cymbals

Ill take any advice!!

View from behind kit:F8BFB3F3-DCA5-4F5D-8C92-5ACC9A6A7D72.jpeg

View into kit:
14B55C4B-9A74-458E-808A-5ECD7218FCDE.jpeg
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
I agree with others. It's better to protect your hearing with earplugs rather than treating the room.
In some respects I even prefer the sound that way - l almost feel drums overdrive my ears, they are so loud!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Taming the room may make the volume more manageable in the rest of the house, but it won't make the drums themselves any quieter. Sure, a room can amplify the volume to an extent, but you are still sitting at the source of the sound. As others have said, earplugs are a must.

As for tinnitus, it's an occupational hazard. Protect your ears so it doesn't get worse.
 

Ahchv

Active member
I asked because i read this:

The decibel scale is logarithmic, not linear. This simply means that for every 3 decibels you move up or down the scale from 0-194, you are adding or dropping 50% of your remaining sound pressure levels to your exposure. By dropping 6 decibels, for instance, you first move 3 dB, and then another 3 dB. For each 3 dB you drop, your sound pressure levels will drop another 50% of the remaining sound pressure. The following table will help illustrate the order of magnitude associated with dB.
So I figured perhaps absorbing some of the noise or reflections would help.

Is that not the case???
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Well yes it's true, but drums are still loud. Take your snare outside and hit it for a while. Your ears will still tell you to protect them. Maybe not as quickly as in the room, but eventually. If you don't want your ears to get worse you must protect them.

I'm 43. As I sit here and type this I hear: the AC running, the refrigerator, my dogs walking and playing on a hardwood floor, my wife's bird singing, and this super annoying ring inside my head from not wearing any hearing protection for way too long. Don't end up like this!
 
I have severe tinnitus after a lifetime of being around noise - concerts, bands, headphones, construction, military. Yeah, I was doomed!

Ear plugs and muffs should do enough to keep it from getting worse. It's good to catch it early like you are doing, because if it not already, it can become permanent pretty quickly and there is no cure. You should also stay away from caffeine, chocolate and alchohol, all of which can make it worse. I would muffle the cymbals if you are crashing them hard, because that sound is more damaging than any of the drums, although the crack of the snare is also bad. But all in all, there isn't much more that can be done.
 

Ahchv

Active member
I got some custom molds from Microsonic after going to my audiologist for 3D ear scans. I actually do NOT like them - I feel like cheap foam plugs do a better job of blocking sound.

Either way,I always do plugs or mold AND ear muffs. I think my tinnitus has not gotten better and in fact comes back a tiny bit worse

Thanks for the caffeine and alcohol advise... I do think I get it from that sometimes too!
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I got some custom molds from Microsonic after going to my audiologist for 3D ear scans. I actually do NOT like them - I feel like cheap foam plugs do a better job of blocking sound.

Either way,I always do plugs or mold AND ear muffs. I think my tinnitus has not gotten better and in fact comes back a tiny bit worse

Thanks for the caffeine and alcohol advise... I do think I get it from that sometimes too!
I've had good experiences with Microsonic. Surprised to read this.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I asked because i read this:

So I figured perhaps absorbing some of the noise or reflections would help.

Is that not the case???

They're referring to the source of the noise.

By the time it reaches sound absorbing material for a db reduction, it's already passed through you.

You could reduce the source of the noise by using muffling on the drums and cymbals, and so on.
 
Some great advice here. Start with the source of the sound by muffling it. Much of my redundant practice on the drum set is done with Evans Sound Off pads. When I want to play live drums, I make sure I use my Vic Firth headphones, or ear plugs. I'm fortunate that my tinnitus is not overwhelming, but I'm conscientious with ear protection. I always have earplugs in my car so I have no excuse not to use them. Also be mindful of everyday environmental noise such as that produced while mowing a lawn, or using power tools.
 
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