Red House - thoughts

wsabol

Gold Member
https://youtu.be/j5rbCghbVlg

If you are willing and able, id like some comments on my performance here. I know the camera isnt pointed anywhere helpful, but stylistically, feel-wise, i wonder if the blues masters among us have any comments.
Very much appreciated.

Thanks everybody.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I really liked the feel you made Will. The opening of the hi hat thing you do during the verses and leads...I don't see many guys do that. It's not hard, so I don't understand why guys don't play it like that around me. It really makes the feel. I find it irresistible the way Mitch did that, it totally influenced me. I use that hi hat opening thing in other songs to great effect. You guys seem like you really understand what Blues is supposed to feel like. The only neg I have is I guess I would have liked to hear a tad less volume when the singer was on mic. A rim click even. I know that's not how Mitch did it. It's JMO. But what you played was beauty man.
 

wsabol

Gold Member
Dude, wow. That means a lot coming from you.

Yea, I think you just have to go all out Mitch on that tune, there's no other way to play it. especially the fill in the beginning - so perfect.

Thanks again Larry for the criticism, I do bring the volume down on the verses for the vocals, but this is such a dark dirty song, I don't think I could handle rim clicks. I'd really perfer to have a fat and muffled pfunk type snare sound honestly. All the space left in those verses leaves maybe too much room for snare ring and buzz and crap to distract from the vocal, but I don't have a drum tech on staff to help me switch out snares on a gig lol. Different strokes, different appraoches, its all good.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It was one of those cases where it sounded like there wasn't enough people to suck the sound up, or there was nothing but hard surfaces in the room, or maybe a combination. It sounded like a very loud room from a sound absorption POV. I don't know if that's the way it really was but it sounded like it on the recording.

Mitch does go for it on the original version and doesn't hold back volume-wise. It is so badass the way he played that initially. The best anyone can do is to try and equal it IMO. And I was just picking one little nit, the song really worked for me the way you did it. It was refreshing to hear. Blues can really kind of suck if it's played by people who don't absolutely love it.

But the room does have to be taken into consideration. Trust me, if you would have went to the rimclick for the verses, and I'm just talking about this particular room because the room seemed so reverberant, the dynamic would have sounded more appealing than you might think. Pulling back volume-wise by the drummer sounds easily as good as pushing it, in many places, especially in blues. Plus it automatically puts the others at ease, it just does. It makes the others feel good when the drums are underneath the vocals.

But man damn fine job Will.
 

wsabol

Gold Member
That's a good thought.

This was recorded just on my phone camera, and it fell over on the floor so your musty getting snare side crack, but YES the room is a very reflective! Not square, but concrete floor and wood walls. And we played in the mid afternoon for a Marine Birthday celebration, so it definitely wasn't full. Good ear.

I'll keep that in mind for next time.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Drums, guitar, and vocals especially, are all great, but the bass player can't seem to get out of funk mode, though. Noel Redding's bass line on this tune is not a simple blues "walk" -- it has chords, which are rare territory for bass, but it works well because the rest of the tune is so sparse. There is no rhythm guitar track or keyboards to state the harmony, so the bass fulfills this role instead. Supplied with harmony underneath, Hendrix can (and does) solo with more exploration, and doesn't have to "touch base" as often.

Show your bass player this video. This legato, chorded bass line, as opposed to the sparse, walking line, should embolden your guitar player's improv even more, and will definitely make Mitch Mitchell's (kind of weird) open hi-hat thing sound much less out-of-place.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Drums, guitar, and vocals especially, are all great, but the bass player can't seem to get out of funk mode, though. Noel Redding's bass line on this tune is not a simple blues "walk" -- it has chords, which are rare territory for bass, but it works well because the rest of the tune is so sparse. There is no rhythm guitar track or keyboards to state the harmony, so the bass fulfills this role instead. Supplied with harmony underneath, Hendrix can (and does) solo with more exploration, and doesn't have to "touch base" as often.

Show your bass player this video. This legato, chorded bass line, as opposed to the sparse, walking line, should embolden your guitar player's improv even more, and will definitely make Mitch Mitchell's (kind of weird) open hi-hat thing sound much less out-of-place.
YES. Bass chords! I absolutely cream my jeans when the bass player plays bass chords on this song. I only heard one guy do it without my asking for it. I always have to ask the bass player to play chords on this song, because in my world, no one does. I'll say something to the bass player like...You know a REAL bass player plays chords on this tune, right?

Embarrasses them into it lol.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
YES. Bass chords! I absolutely cream my jeans when the bass player plays bass chords on this song. I only heard one guy do it without my asking for it. I always have to ask the bass player to play chords on this song, because in my world, no one does. I'll say something to the bass player like...You know a REAL bass player plays chords on this tune, right?

Embarrasses them into it lol.
"Hey you sound good man. When are you going to learn the song?"
 
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