Recording with only one or two mikes

kauaiplayer

Member
Good day all,

I need to do a quick recording of a rehearsal, but I'll more than likely only have one, maybe two mikes for my kit. I'll be using my Yamaha Stage Custom Birch (10, 12, 16, 22, 14x5 stock birch snare, 16 & 17 Zildjian Custom A crashes, 12" Custom A splash, Paiste Alpha 20 ride, 14" Paiste Alpha hats ). Any recommendations as to mike placement? The room is small and high-ceilinged with a lot of reflective surfaces. Small PA, two guitars, bass and a vocalist. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
You're talking 2 mics for just kit, not the whole band, yes?

That being the case, I'd put one mic over head aimed at the snare, and the other one in the bass drum. (Option 2: stereo pair (assuming the mics match) in front of the kit (not over head or you won't get much kick).)
 

JimboJimII

Junior Member
I use only a pair of small diaphram condensor mics for my kit at home. Do a Google search for drum mic x/y configuration and you'll get a lot of info and examples.
 

Natronius

Member
I did a recording this weekend that I wanted to have my kit sound "together" so I used two SM 57's only. I placed one about a foot away and a couple inches up from my snare, pointing towards the center of the snare, the other I placed as a right side OH mic.

I was very surprised with the outcome. All cymbals came out clear (I have a ride, 2 crashes, 2 hats, and a china) all toms sound great, the levels are good and I can hear the bass drum well.

Let me also note I wasn't using a lot of crashes, and had to dampen my ride a little.

I think using two mics to get that "whole kit" sound works well, you just have to play with your set up.
 

kauaiplayer

Member

kauaiplayer

Member
Not sure I'm convinced yet, but I'm looking at the Apogee Duet:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVLDIJkk-lk
I just started playing with a guy that has one. We used it for a quick demo recording last week at his house. I didn't get much of a chance to play with it, but it sure beats the tar out of my Tascam us-122. I almost wish they had a chimp engineering the recording, rather than Bob Clearmountain. He could get a great sound with coconut shells and twine.
 

diegobxr

Silver Member
Hey man, there's a method for recording drums with two mics called the "recorderman method". It's pretty simple and it can sound really really good.

At the moment I'm recording with just two mics and I'm using that. Sometimes "XY" and sometimes a broke down version of Glyn John's method. (This last method is basically a recorderman plus snare and bass drum).

Look up some info on that. Recorderman, "XY" and Glyn Johns.

Example:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeR6XAoAj8Q (go to 2:00 on)


Cheers.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
When we go to record, we try pretty hard to round up all the Mikes we can find. One time a guy named Jim got in the studio and it was much less productive.
 

kauaiplayer

Member
Great information. Thanks Diegobxr. The string concept makes total sense and Stick is a scream. Dr_Watso, I believe I know this Jim you speak of. Nice guy, but can't dance a lick.
 

Lunar Satellite Brian

Senior Member
You're talking 2 mics for just kit, not the whole band, yes?

That being the case, I'd put one mic over head aimed at the snare, and the other one in the bass drum. (Option 2: stereo pair (assuming the mics match) in front of the kit (not over head or you won't get much kick).)
Just did this exact same thing for a demo, it works pretty well considering.
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
Overhead and kick. But put the overhead low enough so that it doesn't pick up mostly cymbals.
 
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