Recommendations for a new drum kit.

RaxCity

Senior Member
Hey guys. I'm in the process of saving up for a new drum kit and I'm looking at a couple of options.

The first option is a Tama Silverstar kit, and the second option is a Yamaha Stage Custom shell pack.

Both kits are 5 piece kits and both are birch. They both cost $1,495NZD but keep in mind the Tama one also comes with hardware. Out of these two options, which one would you guys recommend the most? At the moment I'm leaning towards the tama kit, but I've seen a lot of praise for the Stage Custom on this forum so I thought I'd get your input first, especially since I won't be able to afford if for another couple of months.

Thanks!
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
I know there's nothing quite like getting a brand new shiny drumset, but if you buy used, you could get a lot more for $1,500... Higher quality kit; more pieces; more money left over for hardware, cymbals, etc. Just a thought.
 

VitalTransformation

Silver Member
You really can't go wrong with either. Both offer sublime build quality and both brands are renowned for their hardware. Get the kit that has a finish that most appeals to you! The psychoacoustic effect of a beautiful looking finish cannot be overestimated.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Hey guys. I'm in the process of saving up for a new drum kit and I'm looking at a couple of options.

The first option is a Tama Silverstar kit, and the second option is a Yamaha Stage Custom shell pack.

Both kits are 5 piece kits and both are birch. They both cost $1,495NZD but keep in mind the Tama one also comes with hardware. Out of these two options, which one would you guys recommend the most? At the moment I'm leaning towards the tama kit, but I've seen a lot of praise for the Stage Custom on this forum so I thought I'd get your input first, especially since I won't be able to afford if for another couple of months.

Thanks!
I feel sorry for you folks outside the US,I just saw a new Yamaha 5 piece stage custom for $549 USD new.
Great sounding drums.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
I know there's nothing quite like getting a brand new shiny drumset, but if you buy used, you could get a lot more for $1,500... Higher quality kit; more pieces; more money left over for hardware, cymbals, etc. Just a thought.
In the majority of cases I would agree, but the OP is in NZ.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
I know there's nothing quite like getting a brand new shiny drumset, but if you buy used, you could get a lot more for $1,500... Higher quality kit; more pieces; more money left over for hardware, cymbals, etc. Just a thought.
In the majority of cases I would agree, but the OP is in NZD.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
My vote would be for the Yamaha. I just like their stuff that much better. I'm assuming you already have good cymbals?
 

RaxCity

Senior Member
Both are good kits. Do you need hardware?
Yeah, I could probably use a couple of extra cymbal stands, and I can always sell on anything spare.

I know there's nothing quite like getting a brand new shiny drumset, but if you buy used, you could get a lot more for $1,500... Higher quality kit; more pieces; more money left over for hardware, cymbals, etc. Just a thought.
I'd love to get used, but unless something that I want comes up in the next few months, my only options are buying new or ordering from the US and spending loads of money to ship it over which might be a bit of a hassle. Not too many decent used kits are available over here and even is I did get lucky, I'd only save a couple hundred at best.

You really can't go wrong with either. Both offer sublime build quality and both brands are renowned for their hardware. Get the kit that has a finish that most appeals to you! The psychoacoustic effect of a beautiful looking finish cannot be overestimated.
Thanks man, both come in a few nice looking finishes so that doesn't really worry me too much :)

I feel sorry for you folks outside the US,I just saw a new Yamaha 5 piece stage custom for $549 USD new.
Great sounding drums.
Yeah it kinda sucks that everything is more expensive here but the good thing is minimum wage is about $15 over here so it won't take me too long working at my part time job to save up

My vote would be for the Yamaha. I just like their stuff that much better. I'm assuming you already have good cymbals?
Yeah my cymbals will do for now, I don't gig at the moment, I just play at church every now and again, so my cymbals are fine for now, but my kit is garbage and I really want to get something decent to practice on haha.
 

Dutch

Senior Member
Yeah, I could probably use a couple of extra cymbal stands, and I can always sell on anything spare.



I'd love to get used, but unless something that I want comes up in the next few months, my only options are buying new or ordering from the US and spending loads of money to ship it over which might be a bit of a hassle. Not too many decent used kits are available over here and even is I did get lucky, I'd only save a couple hundred at best.



Thanks man, both come in a few nice looking finishes so that doesn't really worry me too much :)



Yeah it kinda sucks that everything is more expensive here but the good thing is minimum wage is about $15 over here so it won't take me too long working at my part time job to save up



Yeah my cymbals will do for now, I don't gig at the moment, I just play at church every now and again, so my cymbals are fine for now, but my kit is garbage and I really want to get something decent to practice on haha.
Have a look at Thomann in Germany (www.thomann.de). They sell the Yamahas as shell sets for considerably less money than our local retail and only charge 50 euros to ship to Australia/New Zealand. I've used them, they're reliable and use DHL for shipping.

Dutch
 

VitalTransformation

Silver Member
Have a look at Thomann in Germany (www.thomann.de). They sell the Yamahas as shell sets for considerably less money than our local retail and only charge 50 euros to ship to Australia/New Zealand. I've used them, they're reliable and use DHL for shipping.

Dutch
+1 for Thomann! Customers outside the EU often find that they provide cheaper shipping to their location compared to their own domestic retailers. Packaging is also always very solid!
 
I am a big proponent of building a Keller kit to your exact specs. If you can turn a screwdriver, you can have a company like Precision Drum send you shells with any bearing edge profile you want, lug holes pre-drilled and finished with a wrap. You just pick the sizes, shell material and thickness, and assemble the hardware and you've got a lot of drumset for not a lot of money. If you want an oil or lacquer finish, you can save hundreds of dollars more by finishing the shells yourself. Just s thought. I spent a year looking for my next off the shelf kit. After looking at just about everything out there, I'm about 1/2 way though building a Keller 8 ply with Precision's help. All I'm doing is dying, oiling and waxing the wood. It's not that hard.
 

mike d

Silver Member
I am a big proponent of building a Keller kit to your exact specs. If you can turn a screwdriver, you can have a company like Precision Drum send you shells with any bearing edge profile you want, lug holes pre-drilled and finished with a wrap. You just pick the sizes, shell material and thickness, and assemble the hardware and you've got a lot of drumset for not a lot of money. If you want an oil or lacquer finish, you can save hundreds of dollars more by finishing the shells yourself. Just s thought. I spent a year looking for my next off the shelf kit. After looking at just about everything out there, I'm about 1/2 way though building a Keller 8 ply with Precision's help. All I'm doing is dying, oiling and waxing the wood. It's not that hard.
That sounds like a really fun way to go, if you have the space, time, and resources. :)
 
That sounds like a really fun way to go, if you have the space, time, and resources. :)
Not really. I did a lot of the work on my balcony. If you take a cymbal stand and extend the boom arm all the way to 90 degrees, you can wrap it with a towel or something and you the have a perfect stand to work on the outside of the shell. You can work on the inside by laying the shell flat on a table. I've gone dead simple: Keller 8-ply shells, water-based wood dye, danish oil and paste wax. There are instructional videos on YouTube to teach you how to apply these very simple and practically fool-proof finishing methods.

The cool thing is, once you learn how to do This, you can build as many kits as you want for very little money. If you already have a drumset, you can use the hardware to save even more money. Then each time you want or need a new set, you just do a new set of shells and swap the hardware to the new shells.

All said-and done I'll have a American-made drum set with top flight components for under $1,000. It would hard to beat that even in the used market. And, every time I do this, I get better, make better drums etc.
 
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RaxCity

Senior Member
Have a look at Thomann in Germany (www.thomann.de). They sell the Yamahas as shell sets for considerably less money than our local retail and only charge 50 euros to ship to Australia/New Zealand. I've used them, they're reliable and use DHL for shipping.

Dutch
+1 for Thomann! Customers outside the EU often find that they provide cheaper shipping to their location compared to their own domestic retailers. Packaging is also always very solid!
Cheers for that recommendation! I just worked it out and I'll save around $300NZD after tax if I order online and ship it over here, which is pretty cool. They have quite a nice range of stuff on that site so I'll definitely get some more stuff from there.
 

Dutch

Senior Member
Cheers for that recommendation! I just worked it out and I'll save around $300NZD after tax if I order online and ship it over here, which is pretty cool. They have quite a nice range of stuff on that site so I'll definitely get some more stuff from there.
Before you do I'd suggest you check the value limit you can import into NZ without attracting GST or import duties. In Australia that limit is $1000, so any individual purchase from an overseas supplier needs to be below that amount if you want to avoid those additional costs.

Good luck,

Dutch
 
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