Real Book Drum Transcriptions - The attempt of an educational resource - Newest transcription: "On Green Dolphin Street", Miles Davis

Thank you so much for your kind words! I'm glad you're enjoying the channel.

You are welcome to transcribe the music for yourself in Musescore as long as you credit me as the source, use it for your personal use and do not pass it on to third parties. Thank you for your understanding!

If you have any questions, just let me know. Keep drumming!
 
Wow, your channel is GOLD, mother lode 👏👏👏
Would you mind if i actually transcribed into Musescore for myself?
Incredible and playing also !
Thank you so much for your kind words! I'm glad you're enjoying the channel.

You are welcome to transcribe the music for yourself in Musescore as long as you credit me as the source, use it for your personal use and do not pass it on to third parties. Thank you for your understanding!

If you have any questions, just let me know. Keep drumming!
 
Dear community,

please check out my latest video.


In this video I present a drum transcription of the first 68 bars of the track "Hittin’ the Jug", recorded by Gene Ammons for his album "Boss Tenor" on June 16, 1960, in Rudy Van Gelder Studios in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The drummer on this session was Art Taylor.“Hittin' the Jug” is a slow swinging blues composition by Gene Ammons, which can be heard on his celebrated 1960 album “Boss Tenor”. The piece features a legendary quintet: Ammons on tenor saxophone, Tommy Flanagan on piano, Doug Watkins on bass, Art Taylor on drums and Ray Barretto on congas. Although Art Taylor mainly plays quarter notes and basically no comping figures, the song swings incredibly. A masterly achievement in making a lot out of very little.

Drummer Art Taylor proves that you can swing immensely with just quarter notes. Taylor's precise and pulsating quarter notes form the foundation of the song and are the key to this sound. Art Taylor dispenses with complex figures and concentrates on the essentials: the groove. A prime example of how you can make a lot out of a little. Despite the leisurely tempo, the song still radiates energy and joie de vivre.

Are you a jazz drumming beginner? Then Art Taylor's version of “Hittin' the Jug” is just the thing for you! Why?

- The use of mainly quarter notes and the slow tempo make it easy to get into the groove.
- The groove offers enough depth to improve your feel for jazz.
- Despite its simplicity, the groove swings and gives you a great feel for jazz rhythm.
- The slow tempo allows you to concentrate on the precision and timing of your strokes.

However, if you now think this is too simple and very easy to play, you should give it a try. Every stroke must be precisely placed and sound even.

Thank you for watching!
 
Dear Community,

celebrate with me my 50th jazz drum transcription of my Real Book Drumming series on my YouTube channel with Herbie Hancock's “Maiden Voyage”!


In this video I present a drum transcription of the first 68 bars of Herbie Hancock's classic “Maiden Voyage”, recorded for Hancock's 5th studio album of the same name “Maiden Voyage” for Blue Note Records on March 17, 1965 at Rudy Van Gelder Studios in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The drummer on this session was Tony Williams, who was only 19 years old at the time.

“Maiden Voyage” is a modal piece composed by Herbie Hancock in an AABA form. The song uses modal scales, resulting in an open and relaxed soundscape. Herbie Hancock explained that the piece was inspired by the idea of a voyage at sea. This maritime theme is reflected in the gentle, flowing melodies and wave-like rhythms, which convey the feeling of a calm yet exciting sea voyage. Tony Williams' dynamic playing contributes significantly to the atmosphere of the piece and perfectly complements the melodic lines of the other instruments. Herbie Hancock on Tony Williams: “He had an incredible ear and a unique sense of rhythm. He could hear and feel the music in a way that few others could.”

If you like the video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe directly, it costs nothing and doesn't hurt. :) Thank you for your support!
 
Dear community,

in my newest video I present a drum transcription of the first 104 bars of Herbie Hancock's 15+ minute fusion masterpiece "Chameleon".


"Chameleon" is an iconic track from Hancock's 12th album "Head Hunters", which was released on Columbia Records on October 13, 1973, recorded September 1973. This album marked a turning point in jazz music as it was one of the first tracks to incorporate electronic instruments and funky rhythms into jazz, bridging the gap between jazz and funk. The drummer on this recording is Harvey Mason, whose creative and groovy playing lays the foundation for this track.

The track "Chameleon" is based on a striking, recurring bass riff that provides the foundation for the improvisations above. Herbie Hancock's keyboard playing, along with Bennie Maupin's saxophone lines and Harvey Mason's pulsating drums, create an interesting soundscape.

In his book "Possibilities", Hancock describes how he wanted to take a new direction in jazz with "Head Hunters" and especially with "Chameleon", which was influenced by funk and electronic music: "I wanted to reach a wider audience and combine the sophistication of jazz with the directness and groove of funk."

Feel free to leave a like and subscribe to my channel and sharing my video is of course explicitly allowed.

Thank you so much for your support, it means a lot to me.
 
Dear community,

in my newest video I present a drum transcription of the first 104 bars of Herbie Hancock's 15+ minute fusion masterpiece "Chameleon".


"Chameleon" is an iconic track from Hancock's 12th album "Head Hunters", which was released on Columbia Records on October 13, 1973, recorded September 1973. This album marked a turning point in jazz music as it was one of the first tracks to incorporate electronic instruments and funky rhythms into jazz, bridging the gap between jazz and funk. The drummer on this recording is Harvey Mason, whose creative and groovy playing lays the foundation for this track.

The track "Chameleon" is based on a striking, recurring bass riff that provides the foundation for the improvisations above. Herbie Hancock's keyboard playing, along with Bennie Maupin's saxophone lines and Harvey Mason's pulsating drums, create an interesting soundscape.

In his book "Possibilities", Hancock describes how he wanted to take a new direction in jazz with "Head Hunters" and especially with "Chameleon", which was influenced by funk and electronic music: "I wanted to reach a wider audience and combine the sophistication of jazz with the directness and groove of funk."

Feel free to leave a like and subscribe to my channel and sharing my video is of course explicitly allowed.

Thank you so much for your support, it means a lot to me.
Hey Drum Buddy...Timo,

This is my very favorite beat by far! Although I don't know how to read music, that beat is very similar to one of my favorite beats that I play when I'm drumming to Middle Eastern music along with other songs. Thank you so much for sharing your talent with the drum Community around the world.

Shalom,
D'
 
Your channel is very helpful to deciphering jazz standards/drum parts! I love the visuals with the written transcriptions at the bottom while you're playing. I re-discovered your channel after initially seeing your 1st post and realize now that I missed a lot of good stuff in-between so I'm now subscribed and am enthusiastically viewing the videos- thank you!
 
Hey Drum Buddy...Timo,

This is my very favorite beat by far! Although I don't know how to read music, that beat is very similar to one of my favorite beats that I play when I'm drumming to Middle Eastern music along with other songs. Thank you so much for sharing your talent with the drum Community around the world.

Shalom,
D'
Hey,

thank you so much for your kind words! Music has such a universal language and it connects people peacefully across the globe Even without reading music, it's ultimately about feeling the rhythm and letting yourself be moved by it.

Sharing my passion with the drum community worldwide is truly rewarding, and messages like yours make it all the more worthwhile.

Keep on drumming and spreading those good vibes! Happy playing!

Your channel is very helpful to deciphering jazz standards/drum parts! I love the visuals with the written transcriptions at the bottom while you're playing. I re-discovered your channel after initially seeing your 1st post and realize now that I missed a lot of good stuff in-between so I'm now subscribed and am enthusiastically viewing the videos- thank you!
Thank you so much for your kind feedback!

I’m thrilled to hear that you find my channel helpful. The visuals and transcriptions are something I put a lot of effort into, so it’s great to know they’re making a difference.

I’m also very glad you’ve reconnected with the channel and decided to subscribe! If you have any requests or topics you’d like to see covered, feel free to let me know. Maybe I can also ask you if you would be so kind and share my channel with others. That would help me a lot!

Thanks again for your support, and happy drumming!
 
Timo, fantastic playing as always.. Thank you.
Always loved the simplistic brilliance of this groove, you played it so well man..
Thanks again Timo.
 
Dear Community,

in my latest YouTube video I have tried something completely different, a transcription of Max Roach's drum solo in St. Thomas by Sonny Rollins.


Watch and listen to the solo, which hopefully offers an insight into Roach's approach. Even though I have tried to copy the sounds and guess at the techniques in my performance, this transcription and performance can only be an interpretation and cannot claim to have reproduced Max Roach 100% correctly. Some things are really difficult to hear or to analyze what was really played. If you have other ideas and approaches, let me know! We can all learn from each other.

I hope you like my new video. Also discover my other drum transcriptions and performances on my YouTube channel. Feel free to like the video, subscribe to my channel and share the video - your support means a lot to me! Let's celebrate drumming together!
 
Dear Community,

my "Real Book Drumming" YouTube series has a new video.


In this video I present a drum transcription of the first 68 bars of Wayne Shorter's legendary composition "Footprints".

"Footprints" is a jazz standard composed by saxophonist Wayne Shorter. The first recording of this piece was on February 3 or 24, 1966 for Shorter's album Adam's Apple for Blue Note, produced by Alfred Lion, which was released in 1967. Adam's Apple is Wayne Shorter's tenth album and contains the very first recording of "Footprints". "Footprints" is known for its hypnotic and modal structure and is considered one of Shorter's most important compositions.

Jazz drummer Joe Chambers, known for his innovative style and versatility, was involved in the recording of "Footprints". In addition to Wayne Shorter, Joe Chambers has worked with many top-class artists such as Eric Dolphy, Charles Mingus and Chick Corea.

Chambers' contribution to "Footprints" is unmistakable, as his rhythmic structures and sound variations significantly shape the piece. His playing adds depth and complexity to the piece and demonstrates his ability to blend effortlessly into the soundscape.

Don't forget to like, subscribe, and share the transcription!

Thank you very much!
 
Dear drummers,

dive into the world of jazz drumming with my latest video in my Real Book Drumming series. This time, I’m breaking down the first 68 bars of an early Miles Davis version of “On Green Dolphin Street."


"On Green Dolphin Street" is a popular song composed by Bronisław Kaper with lyrics by Ned Washington. It was composed for the 1947 film Green Dolphin Street, based on Elizabeth Goudge's 1944 novel of the same name. By the 1950s, the song had become a jazz standard, renowned for its beautiful melody and harmonic structure.

One of the most notable early instrumental versions of "On Green Dolphin Street" was recorded by the Miles Davis sextet on May 26, 1958. This recording featured a stellar lineup: Cannonball Adderley on alto saxophone, John Coltrane on tenor saxophone, Bill Evans on piano, Paul Chambers on bass, and Jimmy Cobb on drums. The track was included on the compilation album Jazz Track. Jazz Track compiles sessions by the most recent edition of the Davis Sextet, with music previously released in France as a soundtrack.

Drummer Wilbur James "Jimmy" Cobb joined Davis in 1958, recommended by Cannonball Adderley, and his playing on “On Green Dolphin Street” is a testament to his subtle drumming style. His mastery of brush technique with a light touch and rhythmic precision add a delicate texture to the music.

Check out the transcription and performance on my YouTube channel and explore many more jazz drum transcriptions.

Thank you very much!
 
Back
Top