"Reaction Videos"

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Are theses on the level? When unboxing videos seemed silly, along came the idea of "Watch me watch other people!"

I suspect a large part of their success comes from a seemingly contrived formula of contrasting cultural/generational styles.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Are theses on the level? When unboxing videos seemed silly, along came the idea of "Watch me watch other people!"

I suspect a large part of their success comes from a seemingly contrived formula of contrasting cultural/generational styles.
I very much dislike these when it comes to drum related stuff.

Honestly I never cared for them when it was "Kids react to XY" but I understood the nature of kid's reactions being funny....what I don't get is watching some adult drummer that I don't know react to some famous drummer. Zero patience for these videos. I've seen some "Jazz drummer reacts to ____" and it felt like the biggest waste of time ever - I wanted my few minutes back haha.

I would watch something like "Weckl reacts to XY young drummer" or "Gadd Reacts" - but that's mostly to see what that generation of drummer feels about the youngest generation of drummer's and their style of playing which isn't something I see discussed in interviews or videos often.
 

Flaflaflafla

Junior Member
As a kid I remember countless days with my friends listening to records, introducing each other to our favorite tunes. It was a great feeling when somebody really ‘got’ a song that I love. Reactions are no different. The enjoyment of sharing a song, even if it’s virtual and with a stranger you don’t actuality directly communicate with. As a music lover, I think it’s a great thing.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Wait, I thought that was the objective lol!
You know, my issue with the whole drumming-video phenomenon is that it's often unmusical. It can be more of a physical demonstration than anything else, a showcase of superhuman chops. That sort of thing just doesn't appeal to me anymore. I've been drumming a very long time, and I'm all chopped out at this point. Drum clinics stopped attracting my attention quite some time ago, so the last thing I want to encounter is someone else's reaction to a clinic. Just give me drummers who lay down solid and dynamic backbeats within the framework of music I enjoy listening to.

Having said that, I do, of course, continue to practice rudiments, but that's really with the aim of staying conditioned more than anything.
 
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johnwesley

Silver Member
I've a 12 year old grandson who can spend hours watching "live" videos of other people playing videos!!! I guess kinda like we might watch a baseball game. Technology is great if used for some benefit. It is also a huge waster of time and not unlike the 60s hippies just sitting around smoking weed. Next thing you know, the days over. God help us all.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
You know, my issue with the whole drumming-video phenomenon is that it's often unmusical. It can be more of a physical demonstration than anything else, a showcase of superhuman chops. That sort of thing just doesn't appeal to me anymore. I've been drumming a very long time, and I'm all chopped out at this point. Drum clinics stopped appealing to me quite some time ago, so the last thing I want to encounter is someone else's reaction to a clinic.
Just give me drummers who lay down solid and dynamic backbeats within the framework of music I enjoy listening to.

Having said that, I do, of course, continue to practice rudiments, but that's really with the aim of staying conditioned more than anything.
Oh I agree. There are very few drum solos I like watching. It's always Smith, Weckl, Gadd, Vinnie. I find musicality in their solos, but not many others solo like they do. They provide plenty of chops. Otherwise I need music with it also.

I've a 12 year old grandson who can spend hours watching "live" videos of other people playing videos!!! I guess kinda like we might watch a baseball game. Technology is great if used for some benefit. It is also a huge waster of time and not unlike the 60s hippies just sitting around smoking weed. Next thing you know, the days over. God help us all.
My daughter does this. She watches videos of people building stuff on Minecraft instead of building stuff herself. She has the game. I dont get it.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Oh I agree. There are very few drum solos I like watching. It's always Smith, Weckl, Gadd, Vinnie. I find musicality in their solos, but not many others solo like they do. They provide plenty of chops. Otherwise I need music with it also.



My daughter does this. She watches videos of people building stuff on Minecraft instead of building stuff herself. She has the game. I dont get it.
Yeah. That's what my grandson does too. Mind boggling eh?
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I've a 12 year old grandson who can spend hours watching "live" videos of other people playing videos!!! I guess kinda like we might watch a baseball game. Technology is great if used for some benefit. It is also a huge waster of time and not unlike the 60s hippies just sitting around smoking weed. Next thing you know, the days over. God help us all.
Yea - my daughter watches people playing video games while she gets ready to go out and I'm like "what...why?" - but I'm sure I enjoy videos (like car detailing which I find oddly relaxing haha) that she could never watch.

My daughter does this. She watches videos of people building stuff on Minecraft instead of building stuff herself. She has the game. I dont get it.
This. 100% this.
 

Griffin

Well-known member
The ones I can’t stand (More so than the rest of them) are the ones where there is no conceivable way the person hasn’t seen or heard the thing they’re reacting to before. Like (and this is a made up example, but probably exists) guitar teacher reacts to EVH solo. If you teach guitar you’ve obviously heard Van Halen before, unless maybe you’re a very old classical guitarist.

but as @Hewitt2 said, if it gets kids listening to Phil Collins again it’s not all bad.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The ones I can’t stand (More so than the rest of them) are the ones where there is no conceivable way the person hasn’t seen or heard the thing they’re reacting to before. Like (and this is a made up example, but probably exists) guitar teacher reacts to EVH solo. If you teach guitar you’ve obviously heard Van Halen before, unless maybe you’re a very old classical guitarist.
Agreed. I subscribe to the intractable belief that this asinine enterprise is little more than a sad façade fashioned for the singular purpose of generating attention and thus financial opportunities. The only thing grimmer than making reaction videos is watching them. Unassuming viewers are herded about like lambs to the slaughter. Our species must find a more edifying means of entertaining itself -- such as observing paint dry on a wall or waiting beside a window for the seasons to change. Any alternative would be more engaging.
 

Griffin

Well-known member
Agreed. I subscribe to the intractable belief that this asinine enterprise is little more than a sad façade fashioned for the singular purpose of generating attention and thus financial opportunities. The only thing grimmer than making reaction videos is watching them. Unassuming viewers are herded about like lambs to the slaughter. Our species must find a more edifying means of entertaining itself -- such as observing paint dry on a wall or waiting beside a window for the seasons to change. Any alternative would be more engaging.
If only the YouTube algorithm would pick up how much I hate these videos. I’ll be watching an interesting interview or something and then the damn algorithm auto plays a reaction video.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
If only the YouTube algorithm would pick up how much I hate these videos. I’ll be watching an interesting interview or something and then the damn algorithm auto plays a reaction video.
Yeah, that's exactly what I mean by "herded." Regardless of the content you seek out, you end up being interrupted by programmed substitutes -- not unlike dealing with popups on a news site. That's what I love about books, magazines, and newspapers. Printed pages are passive, enabling concentration.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Agreed. I subscribe to the intractable belief that this asinine enterprise is little more than a sad façade fashioned for the singular purpose of generating attention and thus financial opportunities. The only thing grimmer than making reaction videos is watching them. Unassuming viewers are herded about like lambs to the slaughter. Our species must find a more edifying means of entertaining itself -- such as observing paint dry on a wall or waiting beside a window for the seasons to change. Any alternative would be more engaging.
We used to get drunk and high for fun. Shake up soda cans and open them. Etc. lol
 

Griffin

Well-known member
S
Yeah, that's exactly what I mean by "herded." Regardless of the content you seek out, you end up being interrupted by programmed substitutes -- not unlike dealing with popups on a news site. That's what I love about books, magazines, and newspapers. Printed pages are passive, enabling concentration.
Same reason I love vinyl. Audiophiles can argue all day about quality but nothing forces you to sit and listen like a record, even to the point of needing to get up and flip it. Also artwork and liner notes (at least CDs still had those). But physical books/magazines/newspapers 100% agree; that’s where real reading happens so much more easily.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
But as a counterpoint reaction videos help bring a new audience to appreciate music they might never have experienced.

Look at the crossover effect of “in the air tonight” this week due to a reaction video that went viral. The song is now number 2 on theiTunes chart.
You make a solid point.

However - I will still be avoiding these like the plague.

One thing I do disagree immenly with mr @C.M. Jones is on though is drum videos.

As a total drum nerd - I absolutely love seeing what new players are out there creating - how they are setting up and approaching the kit. It's like anything else - there's good and bad - but I've found some amazing new players out there that I know for a fact will the legends people talk about like Weckl and Gadd and Colauita are talked about now - and I know I'm not alone in that.

Jojo Mayer and Benny Greb are two people that do the same thing - actively seek out young players on places like Instagram, etc.

As a point of reference - there's a young gun named Forrest Rice that I started seeing on Instagram a few years ago and has this style of setting his cymbals ULTRA high with the hashtag #highcymbalgang. Well - he's exceptionally talented - and Jojo Mayer started moving his cymbals up and up...well one day he tagged Forrest and tagged - guess what - #highcymbalgang.

Another example is this absoutely swinging young gun from the UK named Joel Barford - again I discovered him on IG and we talk all the time. Well Benny Greb found him on IG and invited him out to perform with him on some clinics and has totally taken him under his wing.

So this aversion to drum videos, etc. is something I don't understand at all: We play a bad ass instrument and there's some awesome new players coming up that are reaching audiences through social media and youtube, etc.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
You make a solid point.

However - I will still be avoiding these like the plague.

One thing I do disagree immenly with mr @C.M. Jones is on though is drum videos.

As a total drum nerd - I absolutely love seeing what new players are out there creating - how they are setting up and approaching the kit. It's like anything else - there's good and bad - but I've found some amazing new players out there that I know for a fact will the legends people talk about like Weckl and Gadd and Colauita are talked about now - and I know I'm not alone in that.

Jojo Mayer and Benny Greb are two people that do the same thing - actively seek out young players on places like Instagram, etc.

As a point of reference - there's a young gun named Forrest Rice that I started seeing on Instagram a few years ago and has this style of setting his cymbals ULTRA high with the hashtag #highcymbalgang. Well - he's exceptionally talented - and Jojo Mayer started moving his cymbals up and up...well one day he tagged Forrest and tagged - guess what - #highcymbalgang.

Another example is this absoutely swinging young gun from the UK named Joel Barford - again I discovered him on IG and we talk all the time. Well Benny Greb found him on IG and invited him out to perform with him on some clinics and has totally taken him under his wing.

So this aversion to drum videos, etc. is something I don't understand at all: We play a bad ass instrument and there's some awesome new players coming up that are reaching audiences through social media and youtube, etc.
I understand your interest, and I definitely don't fault you or anyone else for enjoying YouTube drumming prodigies and so on. There was a time when I admired drumming for drumming's sake, but I moved beyond that mindset years ago, and it's hard to see myself returning to it. I'm much more intrigued now by drumming that bleeds into a specific musical context, one in which the drummer doesn't stand out but rather fuses seamlessly into the overall ensemble. I often don't even know the names of the drummers I'm listening to. If the music is good, the drummer is doing his or her job, and I see the effort as a collective accomplishment rather than as a great drummer who happens to be playing with a band. In that sense, standalone drummers are at odds with my musical orientation at this point.

Rest assured that in the '80s and '90s, drummers with elite skills and blazing chops were a huge draw to me. My definition of "skills" has just changed over the years. A lot of players who never caught my attention are now catching my attention because their drumming does nothing to warrant attention, if that makes sense. The Drumming God phenomenon just doesn't do it for me anymore.

Example: If I had to choose between listening to Ringo Starr with The Beatles or Dave Weckl with one of his intensely intricate fusion bands, I'd take Ringo in a second, and I think we both know who the more "badass" drummer is between the two. As the story goes, someone asked a Beatle if Ringo was the best drummer in the world. Laughing, the member replied, "Ringo isn't even the best drummer in the Beatles."
 
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