Rattling cymbal or cymbal stand

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I have a problem with a song we're going to record next month ... it's very quiet and subtle. I'm mostly playing cymbal swells with mallets.

Trouble is, there's a ^%$# rattle with one of the cymbals and I can't trace the source. It doesn't come through on the H2 Zoom and the others can't hear it (unless the bassist comes in close) but it spoils the magic for me. I'm not sure it will stand up to the scrutiny of close mic'ing.

I've tried using gaffer tape around both the metal rod and the plastic sleeve but it won't go away.

Help!
 
T

TwoCables

Guest
It could be the wingnut on the top.

Or I suppose it could be coming from the protective sleeve.

But of course, I recommend trying the cymbal on a different stand.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Cheers TC. I took off the wingnut and I only have two stands, with each in use. The stand doesn't rattle if I shake it so it's not intrinsic.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
. The stand doesn't rattle if I shake it so it's not intrinsic.
Not so clear cut Pol. The frequency of vibrations created by your cymbal can't be duplicated by shaking the stand. Wingnuts are a common source of rattles, but so is the interface of one stand portion inserted into another. Esssentially, the outside of the smaller tube can rattle against the inside of the bigger tube, usually when one isn't centralised inside the other. Most common on boom stands due to the eneven loading.

Try altering the relationship of these tubes (i.e. fully extend or retract) to see if that makes a difference.

Springs fitted to the inside of tilters are other offenders, especially if it's a high pitched buzz rather than a typical metal to metal rattle.
 
T

TwoCables

Guest
Cheers TC. I took off the wingnut and I only have two stands, with each in use. The stand doesn't rattle if I shake it so it's not intrinsic.
Then try this cymbal on one of those other stands for about 2 minutes (for a long enough period of time to test it). If the there is no rattle with the cymbal on the stand you tested it on, then you just discovered that this cymbal is best on that stand which means the cymbal that was on there before needs to go on the stand you're concerned about right now.

In other words, you may end up needing to swap stands.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Yup, ideas worth trying.Ta.

Any thoughts on the science behind the plastic/rubber sleeves that sit between the metal of the stand and the cymbal? So far that's been my focus (without success).
 
T

TwoCables

Guest
I don't know. :eek:

But if you have access to your drums right now, then what I recommended should only take a maximum of 1-2 minutes. I mean, all you'll have to do is play it on one of the other stands for 5-10 seconds with the mallets. And so if it doesn't rattle on the stand you tried it on, then that means you can swap stands in order to avoid having to "permanently" swap cymbals. But if it rattles on the tested stand, then try it on another.

I know that they're all in use, but the cymbals can still be removed so that you can test this cymbal on all of them. ;)
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Just tried it. Universal rattles. It's not as issue when playing with sticks or even with loud washes - just the low-to-medium volume parts of the swells.

I'm guessing that I need sleeves of softer material ...
 
T

TwoCables

Guest
Just tried it. Universal rattles. It's not as issue when playing with sticks or even with loud washes - just the low-to-medium volume parts of the swells.

I'm guessing that I need sleeves of softer material ...
I forgot to say this, but this happened to me once when using the mallets to make cymbal swells and it turned out that the wingnuts were too loose (the ones that are removed in order to remove the cymbal).

However, I realize that you don't have the wingnuts on right now. So could it be that something else is loose?
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
However, I realize that you don't have the wingnuts on right now. So could it be that something else is loose?
Nope, apart from having a few screws loose ... like many other musos :)

Yes, I checked everything. The stands are pretty cheap and, the more I think about it, the more I suspect it's the sleeves. This weekend I'll buy the best ones I can get and report back ...
 
T

TwoCables

Guest
Nope, apart from having a few screws loose ... like many other musos :)
lol! I really didn't see that coming!

Yes, I checked everything. The stands are pretty cheap and, the more I think about it, the more I suspect it's the sleeves. This weekend I'll buy the best ones I can get and report back ...
Damn. Well I hope it really is as simple as that.

I'm really looking forward to seeing the results!
 

Muckster

Platinum Member
Poly,

The problem is almost certainly at the tilter somewhere. Take the tension spring out of the tlter if it has one and reassemble on the stand and try it. If it still rattles reinstall the spring.

Don't forget to look at the metal cup in which the bottom felt sits on. They can rattle as well.

Give everything on the stand with a nut a good tightening (which i'm sure you have).

Replace the cymbal sleeve. If that still rattles, get some hose (like you see in a fish tank) that matches the diameter of the sleeve and make a sleeve out of that and try it.

Also, be sure to check all press pins (refer to picture). Some times they can be loose and cause the related hardware to become loose and rattle. A dab of super glue takes care of that.

If all that doesn't work remove wing nut, position new cymbal stand under wing nut and tighten. LOL.



Hope you find that rattle soon!
 

Attachments

Witterings

Silver Member
Wingnuts are a common source of rattles, but so is the interface of one stand portion inserted into another. Esssentially, the outside of the smaller tube can rattle against the inside of the bigger tube, usually when one isn't centralised inside the other.
I had this on a cheap cymbal stand recently and took the inner pole out and just put a couple of wraps of selotape round the bottom of the pole before putting it back in and it stopped it.

If you think it may be the sleeves before you go and change them take the sleeve off and put a thin layer of tape round the stand itself and put the sleeve back on and also put a thin layer of tape around the outside of the sleeve. That should give some padding and stop either the sleeve not fitting the cymbal stand correctly or the cymbal rattling on the sleeve and should create the same effect as having softer sleeves.
 

barryabko

Senior Member
Try using the mallets on a different cymbal or tabletop to rule those out. I had a pair of mallets that rattled.

Barry
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
I'm incline to follow Muckster. I've had the most problems with things vibrating around joints held together with roll pins.

There is a putty used to seal ductwork that is great for killing vibrations. You might try glopping some on at the various joints. It comes right back off. This might get you through your session until you can get the stands fixed.

Another thing might be using the one piece molded plastic sleeve/base things instead of the metal washer and plastic sleeve. But if the washer is the culprit, a bunk of duct seal will keep it from vibrating.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Thanks for these ideas. No matter how I go, the thread's shaping up as a good resource for others.

Wing nuts tight - check

Swap stands - check

Sticky tape in case inner tubes are rattling - check (also tried

Tilter - one of them is solid, the other I'll cover in Aeolian's putty

Plastic sleeve with base instead of washer - in the less problematic stand

Mallet check - check. I bought new mallets last week for sound variety.

Sleeve replacement - to do tomorrow

Roll pin joints - this morning I tried putting my foot on the stand base so it couldn't rattle

Remove wing nut, position new cymbal stand under wing nut and tighten - a possibility, but all the light stands I could find were bottom of the market.

The high quality stands all seemed very shiny and designed to hold a small elephant stable through a napalm attack via an extended boom arm, bolstered by a quintuple braced base with cast iron ballast. All I want is for my cymbal to be held up near my little drums so I can go tappity tap ...
 

THC

Senior Member
If your like me, now that you know its there, it might as well be as loud as the cymbal itself. Rattles and squeeks drive me insane. Especially ones in the car.

Have you tried the mallets and cymbal and with different stand combinations in a different location away from your kit. This might isolate a particular piece of equipment as the culprit.

How frustrating. Keep at it. Eventually you'll track it down and kill it.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
If your like me, now that you know its there, it might as well be as loud as the cymbal itself.
It feels that way. I was amazed that the others weren't hearing it.

There was a brief period when I thought it was solved after improvising (desperately) with bits of tape and paper around the sleeve. And the sound seems to be coming from that area but since I've been trying to repeat that success without joy, I can't discount other possibilities.

But it's not my rings, GD ... nor my bolts

 
Top