Random Thoughts II

opentune

Platinum Member
why do they name cheap metal (such as on some lugs) 'pot metal'?
of all the woods used for drums, which is the most endangered besides real mahogany?
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Pot metal—also known as monkey metal, white metal, or die-cast zinc—is a colloquial term that refers to alloys of low-melting point metals that manufacturers use to make fast, inexpensive castings. The term "pot metal" came about due to the practice at automobile factories in the early 20th century of gathering up non-ferrous metal scraps from the manufacturing processes and melting them in one pot to form into cast products. A small amount of iron usually made it into the castings, but too much iron raised the melting point, so it was minimized.

There is no metallurgical standard for pot metal. Common metals in pot metal include zinc, lead, copper, tin, magnesium, aluminium, iron, and cadmium. The primary advantage of pot metal is that it is quick and easy to cast. Because of its low melting temperature, it requires no sophisticated foundry equipment or specialized molds. Manufacturers sometimes use it to experiment with molds and ideas (e.g., prototypes) before casting final products in a higher quality alloy. Items created from pot metal include toys, furniture fittings, tool parts, electronics components, and automotive parts.[citation needed]

Anything thrown into the pot.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I've been dealing with the local power lines authority to get overhead cables buried to remove unsightly & troublesome poles / lines from my ground. Started the negotiation process with low expectations of cooperation, & dread of having to deal with "tick box" protocols, etc. Imagine my surprise when I was able to discuss with someone who actually talked sense, & received full cooperation when there was no obligation on them to do so.

Shocked! (I probably will be when I start trenching around the power cables though)
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I've been dealing with the local power lines authority to get overhead cables buried to remove unsightly & troublesome poles / lines from my ground. Started the negotiation process with low expectations of cooperation, & dread of having to deal with "tick box" protocols, etc. Imagine my surprise when I was able to discuss with someone who actually talked sense, & received full cooperation when there was no obligation on them to do so.

Shocked! (I probably will be when I start trenching around the power cables though)
Not a likely scenario here in the states, I can tell you that much. I deal with PG&E on a regular basis for work, and it's a giant pain in the ass. They fight you every step of the way, and are simply looking for places to assess fees.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Not a likely scenario here in the states, I can tell you that much. I deal with PG&E on a regular basis for work, and it's a giant pain in the ass. They fight you every step of the way, and are simply looking for places to assess fees.
This was the fight I was expecting. Indeed, 8 years ago, I tried to have the same conversation with the (then) power lines company at the time, & it didn't end well. The authority has since changed, plus I had some leverage because an existing pole was condemned, & they legally have to engage with me on the works / access. I seized my chance :)

Here's a picture of one of the offending wee beasties (the condemned one), plus associated cables.
 

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Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
That's cool they're working with you. That's what I do all day on an urban level. I do drawings to propose underground work like that for telecommunication lines.

But my real comment is: Man, that English countryside is awesome!! Better than the Sierra Nevada foothills. Do people grow wine there? I just looked it up. Seems most English wineries are East of London.
 
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Mike Stand

Silver Member
That's cool they're working with you. That's what I do all day on an urban level. I do drawings to propose underground work like that for telecommunication lines.

But my real comment is: Man, that English countryside is awesome!! Better than the Sierra Nevada foothills. Do people grow wine there? I just looked it up. Seems most English wineries are East of London.
Wine production in England??!!! Scandalous! Réally, scandalous!

We must stop global warming asap!



 

copperco

Junior Member
Why is a semibreve also called a "whole note? Surely the semi part indicates that is half of something else (i.e. a breve).

It is worse than that. Why does a "whole note" have four beats? If it is "whole", surely it is "one"?

And while I am here, if you play semiquavers in 7/4, they can't be 16ths can they? They must be 28ths.

Notes are funny things.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
Why is a semibreve also called a "whole note? Surely the semi part indicates that is half of something else (i.e. a breve).

It is worse than that. Why does a "whole note" have four beats? If it is "whole", surely it is "one"?

And while I am here, if you play semiquavers in 7/4, they can't be 16ths can they? They must be 28ths.
Well, that's my head well and truly messed up. I'd wondered about the semibreve thang before, but luckily I hadn't got any further. Thanks for that.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
There is a note called a breve, worth eight quarters. Looks like a semibreve with short upright lines at each end. It comes from the middle ages, when the beat was usually in minims (half notes). Most time signatures back then were 4/2 or 3/2.

Sometime during the Renaissance everything got halved, so a semibreve became the standard long note, with 4/4 and crotchet beats being the most common time.

And a sixteenth note is named after being a sixteeth of a whole note, not a sixteenth of a bar. Otherwise 3/4, 4/4, 5/4, 6/8, 7/8 etc. would all sound the same because they'd all be divided into sixteen pulses no matter what the time signature was. So there are 28 sixteenth notes in a bar of 7/4, because its 1&3/4 whole notes per bar.

Of course you probably know this already. Still a good 'random thoughts' point to consider. Like why is an orange orange, but a red isn't an apple?
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Random indeed. "Like why is an orange orange, but a red isn't an apple?" Reminds me years ago of a woman I was dating. She would call an "orange an orange" but the "color" was pronounced "urnge". Why I bothered arguing the ridiculousness of that point for the whole time we knew each other is more a testament to my stupidity. A rose is rose by any other name except if it's an "orange" rose then it's an "urnge". Who knew? Hey I was madly "in lust" at the time.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Reminds me years ago of a woman I was dating. She would call an "orange an orange" but the "color" was pronounced "urnge". Why I bothered arguing the ridiculousness of that point for the whole time we knew each other is more a testament to my stupidity.
Not stupidity. Subconsciously your mind was look for a reason not to like her. Or consciously her mind was looking for something to drive you nuts.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
There is a note called a breve, worth eight quarters. Looks like a semibreve with short upright lines at each end. It comes from the middle ages, when the beat was usually in minims (half notes). Most time signatures back then were 4/2 or 3/2.
Just to add as to why there was a precedence of '3' and '4' time signatures. '3' in Church music was considered Holy - as in the Trinity. 3/2 was usually denoted by a circle (representing perfection and completion - as is the Trinity, supposedly), however 4/2 was considered imperfect, so the circle was broken.

This is the origin of the 'C' we sometimes see as a shorthand for 4/4. It doesn't stand for 'common time', that's a backronym.
 
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