Rack or stands

synergy

Senior Member
Hey guys, not sure if there is already a thread on this- I tried looking but couldnt see it.

What are your feelings between using a rack or stands?

I can see that from a transport and setup stand-point a rack system would probably be easier and I can see where if you have a tonne of toms and cymbals then a rack would be beneficial.

However for the rest of us playing in small bars, halls, church etc- what are your thoughts?

I ask because I do not have feelings either way of them- I use stands but have used someone's kit at a gig that had a rack and about 3x the amount of equipment I usually use. I found his kit terrible but it wasnt the rack that was the issue.

A friend of mine has been drumming for over 25 years and absolutely detests them!

Just trying to see peoples feelings on the subject from both sides of the hardware!
 

aydee

Platinum Member
Racks make sense ONLY if your kit always stays at home.

OR, you are a drummer with a road crew & a drum tech of your own.

If your kit travels a lot, I'd recommend a 4 piece/2 cymbal set up with a cymbal stand/tom holder config.
 
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stabmasterarson

Senior Member
I have a double bass kit with 7 cymbals so I really like it a lot. It actually takes up less space than using stands did and nothing moves anymore. Plus I can get my toms closer and flatter than I could when they were attached to the bass drums.

But I am just getting my band to the point where we are looking for gigs, so I could be in for a real pain in the ass, it's my first rack...but I see a lot of gigging metal drummers use racks too.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I remember a gig I did where a drummer was bringing his rack up 3 flights of narrow stairs to the venue. I offered to give him a hand, but he said, "No thanks, I've got it." I passed him 3 times before he got up to the 4th floor, after negotiating furniture and narrow hairpin turns. We arrived at the same time, and I had my kit set up and ready to go before he even had all of his cases brought up.

I don't buy the "less set up time" argument...
 

synergy

Senior Member
I figured you just picked up the rack, walked it into the venue and put it down.....


I guess I didnt look into the actual logistics... You still have to attach the toms and cymbals to it.


Do they provide any musical benefit? I guess with a large kit they help you find a place for everything-

Afterall its just a tube of metal- wonder why it causes such reaction between us drummers/

I guess its that whole single or double-pedal issue type thing
 
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peanut23s

Guest
i feel tho as i dont have a large amount of kit really but i feel rack look ugly and distract the view from the kit and the drummer behind itso i like stands more. clamps and tom holders do exacly the same job with less space taken up and vetter looks

but i see the point if i really wanted i could have a huge kit i can reach with it and like with diosdude's 'monster' so i can see why people would use em
 

rockitman

Senior Member
I wouldn't use a rack for club gigging.

They are nice for theatre or large festivals where you have natural working space. I use a big PDP rack on the road and it actually is lot easier for me. Once it's set up we just lift everything and set it in place. Two guys can clear a drumset from the stage in 5 minutes.
I can set up in 20 minutes and tear down is about the same. It's 6 piece 2 up 2 down, 3rotos, 4 crash, a ride and hats.

Did I mention I prefer to play a smaller kit ? Yeah I do.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
More hassle than they're worth, plus they look like ass. It would probably make sense in certain circumstances, but for the majority of stuff, the rack is wack.
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
I got a rack and was all excited. It's now part of my practice kit. There were positives and negatives to it.

One thing I will say is that, when I first got it, I transported it in the back of a big, empty van. My tech would grab one end, I'd grab the other, we'd walk in, put it down, and most of the set-up was complete. The van was tall enough that I could even leave the cymbal arms to the exact height needed...so my tech would throw on the toms, cymbals, slide in the bass drum, and put up the snare, and it was go time. That did save time.

Still, there are too many problems with small clubs, stairs, tiny doorways, etc. And if you have to break it down, even a little, it doesn't save any time.
 

SharkyBait911

Senior Member
i feel tho as i dont have a large amount of kit really but i feel rack look ugly and distract the view from the kit and the drummer behind itso i like stands more. clamps and tom holders do exacly the same job with less space taken up and vetter looks
I disagree Think a rack is a brilliant thing to get, it's easier and more practical and it looks damn sexy lol it doesn't block out the drummer it just has the same blocking out effect as stands !
 

diosdude

Silver Member
i use a rack with my dub kit, it's basically just a single gibralatar v bar and 2 extra pearl T-leg assemblies i had lying around. At my show last saturday it took me about 10 minutes to set up a 6-piece kit with 6 cymbals and a hi hat. So long as you keep the rack limited to just the front bar, it's pretty much a time saver. Once you start adding side rails, forget it, your setup time becomes exponentially longer with each side you add. I can say this too, there's no way on earth i could have used 6 cymbals if i had stands at this past gig. The stage was so small i had to fit the kit on a space about 6 feet wide by 5 feet deep. 6 tripods would not have worked. I'd say for practical purposes too and flexibility you shouldn't consider a rack unless you have more than six drums and six cymbals.
 

LTNINGFan

Member
I have a Gibraltar rack, and I love it. Now playing shows is a different story...it can be a little time consuming, but I like to get to the venue and get all the cymbals on the booms and toms on there, provided I have a space to the side or back that I can do that right before we go on. When breaking down and transporting, I just leave the booms on there and remove everything else...
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
Rack or stands?

If your kit is conservative, and similar to Max's on Conan O' Brian or Buddy Rich, a rack is IMO, inappropriate. It would be unnecessary and detract from the look.

OTOH,
If you have a kit like Todd Sucharman, Deen Castronovo (3-4 rack toms and cymbals galore) a rack is a godsend.

For a lot of stuff like that, a rack eliminates a whole lot of clutter. When *I* transport a rack, I fold larger parts inward, and unfold them to set up. I don't disassemble the damn thing into little peices. With my method, a 6-7 PC kit goes up/comes down faster than most 5-pc kits with the same amount of cymbals on stands.

Curved racks and the new V-rack look amazing compared to a bunch of stands.
 

LTNINGFan

Member
Rack or stands?

If your kit is conservative, and similar to Max's on Conan O' Brian or Buddy Rich, a rack is IMO, inappropriate. It would be unnecessary and detract from the look.

OTOH,
If you have a kit like Todd Sucharman, Deen Castronovo (3-4 rack toms and cymbals galore) a rack is a godsend.

For a lot of stuff like that, a rack eliminates a whole lot of clutter. When *I* transport a rack, I fold larger parts inward, and unfold them to set up. I don't disassemble the damn thing into little peices. With my method, a 6-7 PC kit goes up/comes down faster than most 5-pc kits with the same amount of cymbals on stands.

Curved racks and the new V-rack look amazing compared to a bunch of stands.
Oh man, if I had a trailer where I could just fold it up (I have the curved kind) that would be so much easier :)
 

jjmason777

Senior Member
I had one of the first rack systems that came out back in the mid 80's. It was the Tama "Cage". It was a 6 foot cube of 1-1/2" tubing and clamps. At first it was cool, in my practice space, but it would never fit on a club stage. Then I started using parts of it, until I had a small rack just big enough for everything. Its now in a closet, replaced with stands and heres why: (nobody mentioned this part yet)
They are TERRIBLE for recording!! You hit a drum, and you hear sounds from ALL your drums and cymbals that are connected to it! Not to mention the rack itself reverberated with it's own pinging sound! I had to go back to stands to isolate each piece from the other.
So I would sum it up this way:
They're fine for gigging (your choice), but no good for recording. Even if your drums are miked at a club, you might pick up unwanted rings and boings.
I am a stands guy for life!
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
I had one of the first rack systems that came out back in the mid 80's. It was the Tama "Cage". It was a 6 foot cube of 1-1/2" tubing and clamps. At first it was cool, in my practice space, but it would never fit on a club stage. Then I started using parts of it, until I had a small rack just big enough for everything. Its now in a closet, replaced with stands and heres why: (nobody mentioned this part yet)
They are TERRIBLE for recording!! You hit a drum, and you hear sounds from ALL your drums and cymbals that are connected to it! Not to mention the rack itself reverberated with it's own pinging sound! I had to go back to stands to isolate each piece from the other.
So I would sum it up this way:
They're fine for gigging (your choice), but no good for recording. Even if your drums are miked at a club, you might pick up unwanted rings and boings.
I am a stands guy for life!
I remember those...as seen in countless hair metal videos. I get your point though, hollow metal tubes tubes transmit sound and resonate themselves.I saw a Carbon fiber rack... it would not resonate the same way.
 
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