Quick kit assembley

Goreliscious

Senior Member
This is with gigging in mind and not looking like a prima donna whilst the rest of the band wait for you to be ready...

Do you have a set order in which you assemble your kit? I think my snare is usually the last thing I put in place and then I push everything around to make it more comfortable, but I don't think I've ever set my kit up the same way twice and I think a system would be beneficial.

P.S i try to avoid memory locks because if you're using a mish mash of your gear and someone elses, a memory lock can be more frustrating than beneficial.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
1: Lay down my rug, with tapemarks for the kick spurs and pedals
2: Pull out all my stands and cymbals set them off stage
3: Put down my kick and pedals. Tape marks on my rug tell me where they go
4: Put up my toms and hihat stand
5: Place the stands on the riser
6: Anything else

Drums do take the longest to set up though, there's really no getting around that.

My ways of minimising setup time is to use straight stands (no booms that have to be adjusted, just spread the legs, extend it to its desired height and go). They're also all the same stand and series, so it doesn't matter which stand goes where. Any stand can be used for any cymbal and in any position.
 
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Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Do you have a set order in which you assemble your kit?
In this order: Throne, Kick, Pedal, Snare, Hat Stand. They are the foundation of my kit and once those are set to my liking, everything else falls into place.

To aid in a quick set up? A pre-marked drum rug and memory locks (or at least stands that are marked) do wonders.
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
For me the order is:

Mat (which has markings for all the other gear)
Kick & Seat - quick check on stage position
All the hardware
Toms
Snare
Cymbals

All the stands are marked for quick setup. Each piece of hardware has one place and it always goes there, and setup takes about 15-20 mins for a 5 piece with hihat + 5 cymbals.
For me the key to a quick setup is the markings (eliminates guesswork, just set each item up once, always the same) and having a routine.
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
i always put the throne down first, then the bass drum/pedal assembly, and then the snare. i usually sit down and get that much adjusted and positioned the way i like it before doing anything else. it's easier to move around the basics of the kit before everything else is added. then i put together the toms. i have memory locks for everything. then i put up all the cymbal stands and get them more or less in place. again, i have memory locks for all stands. finally, i add all the cymbals and make final adjustments. voila! ready to play!
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
if you are using a lot of multiclamps and tom holders and etc., try to transport all your stands as they are, with just the booms and tripods folded. Then you can just pop them into place and go. And take a critical eye to your set, see what you can simplify, pare down, or have on there that you just don't use that often.
 

Witterings

Silver Member
if you are using a lot of multiclamps and tom holders and etc., try to transport all your stands as they are, with just the booms and tripods folded. Then you can just pop them into place and go. And take a critical eye to your set, see what you can simplify, pare down, or have on there that you just don't use that often.
I do this and keep my arms attached to the stands with memory locks on everything - kick / pedal 1st, rack toms, floor tom, cymbal stands / high hat, snare, cymbals I use these http://www.thomann.de/gb/tama_qc8_quick_set_cymbal_mate.htm
to save time as well.
Takes me 9 minutes to set my kit up and am normally waiting for the guitarist to finish plugging in his pedals and tuning !!!
 

Travis22

Senior Member
I bought a rack to make my life easier. I setup my kick and pedals, then the rack, then finally put on my toms and cymbals and I'm done. If I have room to assemble the rack before we go on, Im usually the first to be done setting up.

What kills me on time is when people try to help me. It's awesome to have help lugging all the gear from one place to the stage, but when it comes to actual setting up, I'm much faster on my own. Ok, or with the assistance of my girlfriend, who I must admit can setup my kit just as quickly as I can, and she isn't even a musician! :)
 

chaymus

Senior Member
I bought a rack to make my life easier. I setup my kick and pedals, then the rack, then finally put on my toms and cymbals and I'm done. If I have room to assemble the rack before we go on, Im usually the first to be done setting up.

What kills me on time is when people try to help me. It's awesome to have help lugging all the gear from one place to the stage, but when it comes to actual setting up, I'm much faster on my own. Ok, or with the assistance of my girlfriend, who I must admit can setup my kit just as quickly as I can, and she isn't even a musician! :)
You got a keeper there!
 

Goreliscious

Senior Member
Regarding carpets/mats/rugs etc...

Are purpose made products any better than regular mats? Regardless of whether it's a purpose made mat or not, is there anything I should look out for E.g: rubber on the underside, short pile on top?

Also, what's the minimum area it needs to cover? I would imagine that it'd only need to cover bass drum, pedals and hi-hat stand as everything else would be pretty stationary.
 

Travis22

Senior Member
Oh I would NEVER just walk off and leave her to do it alone, she would probably make me walk home carrying the whole damn thing! Lol! But seriously, I know I'm a lucky dude to have that kind of help, and because of that and many other reasons, yes, she is a keeper.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Regarding carpets/mats/rugs etc...

Are purpose made products any better than regular mats? Regardless of whether it's a purpose made mat or not, is there anything I should look out for E.g: rubber on the underside, short pile on top?

Also, what's the minimum area it needs to cover? I would imagine that it'd only need to cover bass drum, pedals and hi-hat stand as everything else would be pretty stationary.
IMHO, no.....it doesn't need to have a drum manufacturers brandname on it. As far as I can tell, they are much cheaper without the advertising. Rubber may come in handy, but it's not completely necessary. I've never had a rubber backed mat. I also prefer a short pile carpet.

Mine is large enough to get the drums on there, one or two legs on a couple of cymbal stands don't quite fit.
 

random

Member
My gig kit is hats, ride, bass and snare. I can carry it all in one trip and it takes longer to put the hihat clutch together than to set everything else up. I didn't set out to play an easy to transport set, but the way I like to play, it's one of the benefits.
 

Skwerly

Senior Member
1.carpet
2.bass drum – the center of everything.
3.Bass pedal and snare stand
4.attach the toms and set up the floor tom
5.cymbal stands, high hat stand
6.attach cymbals and high hats.
7.Adjust quickly, and play. Something is always wrong. :p
 
Mark all of your hardware with a black permanent marker. I cut my setup by 40 minutes so now it only takes about ten maybe 15 minutes setup and it is exactly to my liking everytime.

set your kit up at home and get it perfect then mark every stand, every cymbal arm, and snare stand , the more you mark the faster, easier and satisfied you will be with your setup.

I get to the gig and set up then watch all the other guys tune up, lug in PA, mic check and other stuff.

It's called "mind over matter" You have the brain not the drumset, don't let that drumset whip you. :)
 

Travis22

Senior Member
If you are looking for a cheap area rug, check out Wal-mart. I bought a 4ft X 8ft one for like $25 and it fits my entire kit, even if I choose to use all my stands. I play on a 7 piece with 3 roto toms and 9 cymbals and I still have room to spare.
 
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