Question for singing drummers

BruceW

Senior Member
What mic have you folks found to be a good option for singing drummers? Our band uses 58's for all the singers, which is great for the sound guy, but we've found that me using a 58 tends to pick up more hat and snare than we'd like. I realize there are gates and compression and all those techno solutions, I just have come to understand that there are tradeoffs. If I could get something that would make it easier on our sound guy, I'd like to consider it.

(Yes, I would love to use a headset. In my particular case, it wouldn't work out well, as I have a tendency to sing MUCH louder in some passages of some of the songs that I sing, and as such, I tend to back off the mic so as to not overdrive it. On others still, I cheat and find my pitch on a tricky harmony off the mic, and then come back to the mic. Neither of these things are possible with a headset.)

Budget will be a consideration at some point. I fully expect there are some high-end professional mics that will fit the bill. I'm hoping someone has experience with some that might be more in the 58 price range, or at least not way higher...
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
A regular (not Beta) 58 has a cardioid pickup pattern, which is only somewhat directional.

Shure Beta 57 or Beta 56 are decent choices here. You want a super-cardioid pickup pattern to reject off-axis sounds as much as possible. Personally, I really like Beta 57s on vocalists, over 58s, regardless of off-axis rejection.

There's still going to be some bleed, of course. If you can move your hi-hats even a few inches away, it'll help.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
A regular (not Beta) 58 has a cardioid pickup pattern, which is only somewhat directional.

Shure Beta 57 or Beta 56 are decent choices here. You want a super-cardioid pickup pattern to reject off-axis sounds as much as possible. Personally, I really like Beta 57s on vocalists, over 58s, regardless of off-axis rejection.

There's still going to be some bleed, of course. If you can move your hi-hats even a few inches away, it'll help.
A 57 is a quick-fix solution for us to try, as we have some of those on-hand. I'll suggest it to the powers-that-be...heh.
Thanks
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
I sometimes use a headset mic, and other times just use a 58. While the headset does eliminate more of the bleed from the drums, the problem is it's always there. I don't sing on every song, but the mic can't go anyplace. As a result you can sometimes hear me breathing real heavy. I don't like that. I prefer to use the 58 on a boom arm. This way I can swing it out of the way on songs I don't need it for. If you swing it back behind you facing away from the drums it won't pickup as much of the kit and shouldn't be an issue for FOH. The rest of the time sure, it picks up a lot of Hats, but that's the tradeoff for convenience.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Why not get your singing technique better so you can wear a headset? I was in the same boat and wanted to be able to back off the mic if I felt tentative when singing, and then after working out with the headset only, I got my technique better and now I’d rather not have to stretch my neck to reach a microphone. It works out now. And I have a foot pedal to kill the mic when I’m not using it.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Why not get your singing technique better so you can wear a headset? I was in the same boat and wanted to be able to back off the mic if I felt tentative when singing, and then after working out with the headset only, I got my technique better and now I’d rather not have to stretch my neck to reach a microphone. It works out now.

I'll certainly agree that my technique (if you wanna be generous enough to call it that) could use a lot of work. It would be easier for me to just stop singing those particular songs where I have to really belt it out. Agreed that the cheat that I'm doing regarding getting my pitch before coming into the mic is clearly a technique issue that could and should be corrected. That one I've been working on...

The volume issue is far more complicated, for me at least. These passages are really belt-it-out scenarios. Not the whole song, just passages.

If I found myself a deal on a decent headset mic, I'd certainly give it a try. On-hand mad money isn't plentiful, so I tend to try and think it out before jumping in. (Over think it, usually...guilty.) With plentiful expendable cash, I'd be trying all sorts of things with my gear. ;)
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
Do you have a sound guy out front all night or is your sound guy a band member who sets up but can't monitor or adjust on the fly? If it's a guy out front then you could give him a setlist and mark up which passages in which songs he needs to dial you back for. I used to do some really high harmony/falsetto stuff which I could only do full belt, even at gigs where we had a new guy he'd be able to keep things right.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Do you have a sound guy out front all night or is your sound guy a band member who sets up but can't monitor or adjust on the fly? If it's a guy out front then you could give him a setlist and mark up which passages in which songs he needs to dial you back for. I used to do some really high harmony/falsetto stuff which I could only do full belt, even at gigs where we had a new guy he'd be able to keep things right.

We do have a sound guy, most venues. And he pretty much knows when I'll be "going up"...still, I expect at close range of a headset, I might still be overdriving it. I tend to really get loud, for short periods of time.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I'll certainly agree that my technique (if you wanna be generous enough to call it that) could use a lot of work. It would be easier for me to just stop singing those particular songs where I have to really belt it out. Agreed that the cheat that I'm doing regarding getting my pitch before coming into the mic is clearly a technique issue that could and should be corrected. That one I've been working on...

The volume issue is far more complicated, for me at least. These passages are really belt-it-out scenarios. Not the whole song, just passages.

If I found myself a deal on a decent headset mic, I'd certainly give it a try. On-hand mad money isn't plentiful, so I tend to try and think it out before jumping in. (Over think it, usually...guilty.) With plentiful expendable cash, I'd be trying all sorts of things with my gear. ;)
Well, Shure makes the WH20 (I think) that you can buy new for $89. It’s the wired model that terminates in a full-size XLR, so maybe that could be a cheap option?
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
We do have a sound guy, most venues. And he pretty much knows when I'll be "going up"...still, I expect at close range of a headset, I might still be overdriving it. I tend to really get loud, for short periods of time.
This sounds like you absolutely need a compressor so you’re not over-driving your channel. Or what is your sound guy doing back there? 😉
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I sometimes use a headset mic, and other times just use a 58. While the headset does eliminate more of the bleed from the drums, the problem is it's always there. I don't sing on every song, but the mic can't go anyplace. As a result you can sometimes hear me breathing real heavy. I don't like that. I prefer to use the 58 on a boom arm. This way I can swing it out of the way on songs I don't need it for. If you swing it back behind you facing away from the drums it won't pickup as much of the kit and shouldn't be an issue for FOH. The rest of the time sure, it picks up a lot of Hats, but that's the tradeoff for convenience.
How about an inline on off switch
 

BruceW

Senior Member
This sounds like you absolutely need a compressor so you’re not over-driving your channel. Or what is your sound guy doing back there? 😉

He does a great job, by all accounts. Young kid, has been going to school for this stuff, he's worked hand-in-hand with our band leader for a while now, and not only has he satisfied the band leader (no small feat) we get compliments from other musicians and venue people about his sound. We're quite comfortable with him, for as long as he'll be around, now that he's graduated from school.

I wouldn't have the foggiest idea what he actually does, I just hit things with sticks :ROFLMAO:

There haven't been complaints from him or the other folks in the band. Our band leader (and a sound guy himself) has had discussions with the sound guy about the necessity of doing something to try and get the hats/snare out of my vocal channel, if possible, so I was merely hoping that I might help the situation with a better microphone.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
How about an inline on off switch
A friend of mine who uses a headset has such a switch, that he wears on his belt, as a "cough switch" sort of thing. I assume one could be configured as a pedal, too. (I have thought about this stuff over the years, lol.) I tend to sing on more songs than I don't, so while it would be good for the cough situations (or the desire to yell something at a bandmate without it going over the mic) it still wouldn't help me in the "loud passage" scenarios.

There I am again, poor technique guy, heh heh.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
A 57 is a quick-fix solution for us to try, as we have some of those on-hand. I'll suggest it to the powers-that-be...heh.
Thanks
Although the exterior shape is similar, the Beta 57 and a 57 are not the same mic on the inside. A 57 has a wide cardioid pickup pattern (so, lots of bleed), and a boost in the high frequencies -- this is exactly what you do NOT want.

A Beta 57, or Beta 56 -- or something with similar specs from another brand -- is my recommendation. Unless you want to go the headset route.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Although the exterior shape is similar, the Beta 57 and a 57 are not the same mic on the inside. A 57 has a wide cardioid pickup pattern (so, lots of bleed), and a boost in the high frequencies -- this is exactly what you do NOT want.

A Beta 57, or Beta 56 -- or something with similar specs from another brand -- is my recommendation. Unless you want to go the headset route.
Acknowledged!
Thanks
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
You could always try to position your mic where it's not parallel with the ground, angle it a little more away from the drums.

I've used a 58 forever without many issues; however, I'm not a heavy-hitting drummer anymore.
 
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