Question for Singing Drummers

trickg

Silver Member
In recent months, I've been getting involved more and more with my church's praise team as a vocalist. Initially it started off with very simple, straight forward songs because as many of you know, singing and playing drums takes a whole different skill set and approach. Frankly, I don't particularly care for doing it, but because I'm a strong singer, and now that they know I can, they have been assigning me at least one song every week.

This brings me to the question - what do you guys use for a mic stand?

right now I've just got a boom mic coming in from my right side. It's a simple enough solution, but it has it's drawbacks because it limits my movement a little bit. Yesterday I found that I was bumping it a bit whenever I came around to playing something on my floor tom.

I was thinking about maybe looking into a headset mic, but I'd want something affordable and decent enough quality - right now I'm using a Shure SM57 with the foam windscreen. A friend of mine has suggested getting on the goose neck mic stands and using that.

So what do you singing drummers use?
 

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
I fly a regular 58-type mic on a boom stand from my left, above and behind the hihat from me. It gets swung in and out as necessary throughout the show, since I don't want that thing in my face all night, and I'm only singing on about four songs.
 

trickg

Silver Member
Straight stand with a round iron base, and a c. 12" goose neck, parked on my left side (I'm right-handed). Works great! I use a mic with an on/off switch.
I fly a regular 58-type mic on a boom stand from my left, above and behind the hihat from me. It gets swung in and out as necessary throughout the show, since I don't want that thing in my face all night, and I'm only singing on about four songs.
I'll look into those as well - with the way the stage is set up, along with the fact that I have a shield I have to sit behind, I may not be able to move it to the left side.
 

donzo74

Junior Member
I'm right handed and I like a boom stand coming in from my left. I like to raise the vertical section up high and then angle the boom down toward me to keep everything up and out of the way. For my regular gigs, I use a wired Shure Beta 58. At church, I use some wireless mic and I don't know the brand. I have used goosenecks before but it's not a requirement. They do let you set the boom angle up a little higher and even more out of your way. I also prefer to use tripod stands because the round base stands have stability issues with the boom fully extended. For me, flying the mic in from the left keeps the mic stand out of my way while moving around the kit.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
...because I'm a strong singer, and now that they know I can, they have been assigning me at least one song every week.
That's your problem right there! 🤣

I'm really happy that I don't have to sing in a band anymore. I don't miss it!

When I used to sing, I had a boom stand, sort of behind me on my left. The boom arm came over my left shoulder, and my mic had a sharp turn toward my face. It was really easy to swing out of the way.

As far as a headset mic, they can be kind of weird...especially if your team wears IEM's. A friend of mine who plays guitar says he go so tired of hearing the drummer breathing in his head during shows it drove him crazy. In order to fix it, they had to gate his mic, and in doing this, he had to basically yell in his mike to get the gate to lift.

Oh, and God forbid you have to sneeze.
 

trickg

Silver Member
I'm going to see if I can move the mic stand to the other side, but I'm not sure if I can manage it logistically due to the setup in the sanctuary.

Essentially, the drums are set up at the left edge of a platform, as far back to the wall as possible, and behind a shield. I have to get behind the kit from the left/hi-hats side because there are stacked chairs immediately to the right of the kit on the other side of the Plexiglas. Right now the boom stand is coming in from my right side, slightly behind, but mostly just coming in from the side, mainly because that seemed like the best option from a logistics perspective.

I wonder if a gooseneck extension would help. I've got one that someone gave me a number of years ago, but I'm not sure how long it is - probably about 12".
 
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PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Essentially, the drums are set up at the left edge of a platform, as far back to the wall as possible, and behind a shield.
I'm curious as to how a vocal mic will handle being behind a shield with your back against the wall? I'm suspecting tons of drums bleeding into the mic, but I could be wrong. There's just so much noise back there.
 

donzo74

Junior Member
Oh, and God forbid you have to sneeze.
Yeah, I generally have to do some throat clearing after a few tunes or before a real high part so that has kept me from going to a headset. Plus, I like to be able to be right up on the mic when singing lead but then back off a bit if I'm singing backup.

I wonder if a gooseneck extension would help.
It could. You could get away with it coming in from the right if you had the boom fully extended and had a gooseneck. At that point, I would just suggest sandbagging or weighting the base of the stand to prevent tipping and you should be all set.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I have taken to Frankensteining my mic stand solution because I can't stand having the boom in my way. The base is a Gibraltar double-braced tripod with a swivel clamp top, into which I load the top section of a boom mic stand with counterweight. Then I add an 18" gooseneck onto that. The end effect is that the boom can fly in well above the arc of my hands and sticks with two angle adjustments and over seven feet of possible height.. I don't have a bunch of great photos but in this one you can see how it is easy to position.
drumselfie.jpg
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I have both and I prefer a Shure Beta 56a on a stand coming in by my hi hat.

headsets look cool but you need more stuff to make it fly right. Not only did I spend $200 on an AKG 520, I also had to buy an footpedal to mute it when I wasn’t singing, that also passed phantom power, and had an LED on it so I knew when it was on by sight. That was another $150. You need that.

but you can’t do all those cool singer things like back off the mic when necessary or eat the mic for an effect. You’re stuck with that mic on one place the whole time. I don’t mind carrying a mic stand for what I do.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
I'm curious as to how a vocal mic will handle being behind a shield with your back against the wall? I'm suspecting tons of drums bleeding into the mic, but I could be wrong. There's just so much noise back there.
That's why the CM11a works so well. It’s a completely different technology and will hardly pick up your drums directly or reflected from the wall. There is nothing else like it.

Mute button is included on beltpack.
 

trickg

Silver Member
I'm curious as to how a vocal mic will handle being behind a shield with your back against the wall? I'm suspecting tons of drums bleeding into the mic, but I could be wrong. There's just so much noise back there.
That has actually been a problem. I'm using ProMark Lightning Rods, but it's still producing enough volume that it's an issue. I've got it pointed straight back toward me as much as possible, but it's still picking up some of the drums. The only thing "good" is that I'm a strong singer, so any time I'm in a chorus or otherwise going for it, they get enough of me out of the mic. Unfortunately this is old tech - it's an analog board, and they don't have any onboard effects, such as compression, so sometimes in a verse that's both lower in volume and in range, I need to make sure that I'm giving the mic enough sound. Balance is always an issue, but the rest of the worship team seems to like when I lead.

It's kind of funny - I've been singing leads and backup for nearly 20 years in the wedding band that I've been in, but in all of my time in a worship band, no one ever offered to let me sing. Part of it was that I couldn't drum and sing at the same time, but I think part of it was that they simply didn't know that I am a singer too.

Getting back to the microphone solution, they have these nifty mic cables with switches on the connector, so as soon as my song is done, I click the mic off and swivel back behind me.

 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
My mic of choice is an Audix OM7. It needs a bit more gain then most vocal mics, but it has a SUPER tight and limited pick up pattern. Supposedly it was designed for high volume stages. I will say that unless I am right up on it, my vocals don't come through much.

I play right-handed and use a boom cymbal stand to my left with the boom part reaching up, rather than having it come out 90-degrees from the base. I came to this arrangement after whacking the boom arm a few times w/ my sticks.
 

moxman

Silver Member
A boom stand with an SM-58 pointed down a bit so it's just up above your mouth - it forces you to keep your posture up and throat relaxed and open. Also easy to get it out of the way. Headsets are a good option as well but can be expensive to get quality production. Eg. Levon Helm..
 

dboomer

Senior Member
My mic of choice is an Audix OM7. It needs a bit more gain then most vocal mics, but it has a SUPER tight and limited pick up pattern.
That may be of some value if you play out in the open. A tight pattern rejects sound coming at it from the sides. But if you are basically back up against a wall it is of no value because everything bouncing off the wall is bouncing back directly on axis.

The Levon Helm example is only valid if you play on 60‘ wide stages with a 30’ proscenium overhead. It does not translate well to a small stage.
 

rebonn

Senior Member
I have both and I prefer a Shure Beta 56a on a stand coming in by my hi hat.

headsets look cool but you need more stuff to make it fly right. Not only did I spend $200 on an AKG 520, I also had to buy an footpedal to mute it when I wasn’t singing, that also passed phantom power, and had an LED on it so I knew when it was on by sight. That was another $150. You need that.

but you can’t do all those cool singer things like back off the mic when necessary or eat the mic for an effect. You’re stuck with that mic on one place the whole time. I don’t mind carrying a mic stand for what I do.
How do you like the sound of the AKG 520 compared to the Shure and other mics?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I'm right handed and I like a boom stand coming in from my left. I like to raise the vertical section up high and then angle the boom down toward me to keep everything up and out of the way. For my regular gigs, I use a wired Shure Beta 58. I have used goosenecks before but it's not a requirement. They do let you set the boom angle up a little higher and even more out of your way. I also prefer to use tripod stands because the round base stands have stability issues with the boom fully extended. For me, flying the mic in from the left keeps the mic stand out of my way while moving around the kit.
I'm exactly the same, easier to use your left hand to swing the boom arm in and out while your right hand is on the hats/ride. It's an artform that comes with practice.

Don't have to boom arm at a right angle or lower as you can catch the boom arm whilst playing and hit yourself in the mouth with a mic which hurts from experience! Get the boom higher and angle it down to your pie hole :)
 
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