Question for ALL level players.....

brownie1969

Senior Member
I notice that pretty much everytime I sit down at the drum set, I improve, or maybe get more creative dynamically (my ear for what I want to play seems to be growing)... my question is...do you guys feel like your gaining ground much of the time your sitting down.... or do you feel the growth process slows-down over years of playing?
 

nolonx

Member
I think that, as you progress in learning something, the rate at which you get better slows down exponentially, but I'm still in my really fast growth period, so I'll let someone who's more experienced than me talk ;)
 

NUTHA JASON

Senior Administrator
i think that progress over time is not linear or even curved and certainly not plataeux. i think its chaotic and individualistic. i've had slow periods where i wasn't practicing as much or not practicing wisely and i've had periods where new things have inspired me or life has given me more time for drums and my growth has exploded.

as a basic rule though, if i have decent enough time to practice over the last decade its been a case of: the more i know the more i want to know. being a full time drum teacher has also helped keep me from stagnation (some of my pupils are catching up with me so i've got good reason to forge ahead!)

j
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
i've been playing for quite a while now. i'm still learning, but the amount of time and effort it takes to get better has increased a lot, and the improvements i make are more incremental as time goes on. it's worth it though. i have definitely learned some things and made some real improvements in my technique over the past year or two.
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
I, like Nutha, don't think that growth is linear or exponential. I think you go through growth and plateau.

I just think the longer you have been playing the distance between the noticeable growth in skills and the plateaus becomes greater.

I also think that it is during your sort of plateau periods that what you have learned starts to really be ingrained in your playing. For instance at the start of the year I was working on co-ordination and polyrhythmic ideas i.e a 3:16 pattern on the feel while messing around on the top.
Then a couple of months ago I was playing in my jazz group and out of nowhere my left hi hat starts playing on every 2nd and 3rd note underneath my comping and jazz rhythm. It just happened and took me by surprise that this stuff had crept its way into my subconscious and came out there.

Anyway yeah i think the noticeable growth does slow down but when you sit down to play you are improving something or other.

Dave
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I get the most growth from recording and listening back to myself, and playing with others.
My growth during alone practice time comes in fits and starts, and sometimes doesn't even seem to happen. But the more time those sticks are in your hand, the better.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
I've noticed a certain slowing in my ability to learn new physical techniques and tools. But I've found that my ability to think the music and apply what technique I have to a concept or sound has improved as I've gotten older.

You hear many players say that they "didn't really get it until they were 40". I'm still a few years short of that, but I think that perhaps I'm just starting to grasp this thing we're doing.
 

volvoguy

Senior Member
I don't know that I think about good/bad/whatever when I play. It just changes based on whatever I'm listening to at the time... and the ideas that get jumbled up.

The nice thing about being in my mid-30's is that I don't care *where* my playing goes. I just enjoy the sounds, and making them. :)

-Ryan
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I've noticed a certain slowing in my ability to learn new physical techniques and tools. But I've found that my ability to think the music and apply what technique I have to a concept or sound has improved as I've gotten older.

You hear many players say that they "didn't really get it until they were 40". I'm still a few years short of that, but I think that perhaps I'm just starting to grasp this thing we're doing.
I would have to agree 100% with this thought.
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
For me it's all about Focus. If I sit down for a few minutes, I'll just jack around, nothing serious. If I go into a period of time and have that time dedicated to practice, I'll have to have something written down to work on. And stick to it. Like my paradiddles. Single stroke rolls, etc.

But other times it's fun to sit down at the kit and just see what comes forth. Other times it's important to know what to work on and strive to perfect it by being honest with myself. As in "boy, this sucks...I need to seriously work on this".
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I've been playing drums for many, many years and as I grow older it seems as if I have to push myself a bit harder to achieve the same results that I got when I was in my thirties and forties. When I'm in the studio, sight reading comes into the equation quite a bit, especially when I don't get the scores ahead of time as promised. This along with being far sighted puts a bit more burden on me than I was previously use to. The time I give it up is when I can no longer hold a pair of sticks, lol.

Fight to get to where you want to be and keep fighting to stay there.

Dennis
 

mcbike

Silver Member
I have been playing for 17 years.

I have sessions were I take a step backwards, and I have had dark periods of playing in the past where I felt lost and confused and mechanically unsure about myself.

I do think at this point in my playing, I have enough control and independence to do whatever I want to do, and most of my progress in drumming at this point is mental and creative. I usually end up drawing influence from things outside of practice that help my playing improve. (listening, watching other players, thinking in new ways, reading, etc.) of course I'm always working on my singles and doubles to improve speed and control, but most of my progress is in creative areas now.

I've always noticed that when you take time away from something, it is easier when you come back than if you woodshed through it. I haven't played double bass in like 5 years and sat down at a double pedal the other day and everything was so easy to me. It's shocking becuase I haven't been working on double kick at all.
 
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