Question about rudiments...

dtx3yamaha

Junior Member
I've been wondering about double strokes and triple strokes...when these rudiments are practiced am I supposed to bounce the stick two/three times in one stroke only; or, do I quickly make two/three separate and controlled strokes?

For example...suppose I'm practicing the double stroke roll at 70 BPM. If I'm counting "1-and, 2-and, 3-and, 4-and" is the second stroke supposed to fall on each 'and' in a controlled and separate stroke, or do I bounce the stick on each 1, 2, 3, or 4 and just try to keep the bounces controlled and even despite them sticking before the 'and'? Same question for tipple strokes and counting in triplets...

I want to start out these rudiments quite slow in order to get the sticking correct, but it seems like the timing is off if I bounce the stick at slower BPM's (70-80). The same is true when I'm practicing paradiddles...I can't get the pattern consistently correct when I have the BPM set high, and the timing is off if I bounce the stick at a lower BPM.

Thanks for any help :)
 

burn-4

Senior Member
The 'bounce' should ALWAYS be controlled and totally in time- just playing a stroke and allowing the stick to rebound will only work at a certain tempo and isn't a good way to do it.

What you should do with doubles is play a down stroke and control the bounce of your stick with your fingers as the second 8th or 16th note (i.e. 1 (down) + (control) ).

The problem with this method is that as you are effectively relying on a bounce for the second stroke it there will be less velocity with which the stroke is played. Therefore it is a good idea, especially at higher tempo's, to push into the second stroke making it slightly 'accented'. As the speed increases the strokes will even out in volume making a nice even double stroke roll.

Good ways to practise this are playing a shuffle accenting the 3rd partial of the triplet or by playing 8th notes and doing the same thing.
 

Drummertist

Silver Member
When I do double and triple strokes, I use the rebound of the drums and cymbals except when doing them slower where I actually play each stroke. When I say I use the "rebound", it means when I throw the stick onto the drum, it rebounds back up and then I use my fingers and hand to push it back down for another stroke but this is only when playing them at faster tempos. Always try to let the stick do most of the work.

Oh and you'll get a thousand different opinions on how to do double strokes. Just start slow and work to speed them up. Usually, technique works itself out.
 

dtx3yamaha

Junior Member
The 'bounce' should ALWAYS be controlled and totally in time- just playing a stroke and allowing the stick to rebound will only work at a certain tempo and isn't a good way to do it.

What you should do with doubles is play a down stroke and control the bounce of your stick with your fingers as the second 8th or 16th note (i.e. 1 (down) + (control) ).

The problem with this method is that as you are effectively relying on a bounce for the second stroke it there will be less velocity with which the stroke is played. Therefore it is a good idea, especially at higher tempo's, to push into the second stroke making it slightly 'accented'. As the speed increases the strokes will even out in volume making a nice even double stroke roll.

Good ways to practise this are playing a shuffle accenting the 3rd partial of the triplet or by playing 8th notes and doing the same thing.
I certainly aim to maintain control of each stroke...Sometimes when I try to bounce the stick it feels like I'm doing a multiple bounce roll; so I'll just keep doing these at slower tempos.
 

Duracell

Senior Member
I perform doubles like so:

1) Throw stick down with wrist
2) Let the stick bounce back up as close as possible to the starting position
3) Snap stick down again this time with my fingers
4) Move hand back to starting position

In this case you make one single wrist movement for each double. for a more detailed description check out Derrick Pope. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJWldEMFem4
 

Toolate

Platinum Member
The double hits should be even spaced so they sound just like fast singles... I think that is the part you are missing. Regardless of the speed.
 

dtx3yamaha

Junior Member
I perform doubles like so:

1) Throw stick down with wrist
2) Let the stick bounce back up as close as possible to the starting position
3) Snap stick down again this time with my fingers
4) Move hand back to starting position

In this case you make one single wrist movement for each double. for a more detailed description check out Derrick Pope. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJWldEMFem4
Awesome...this has been very helpful.
 

Witterings

Silver Member
If you're just staring out and want to get technique right from the outset I'd think about getting Tommy Igoe's - Great Hands For A Lifetime DVD.
I'd played for many years and my left hand was aweful and wasn't bouncing / comtrolling the stick correctly, this DVD really helped sort it out and has transformed how I play / bounce my left stick.
 
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