Question About Metering

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I just want to make sure I've got this right. I'm going to try to keep it as simple as possible so as not to be confusing.

My metronome is on my phone. In 4/4, it has 16 buttons divided into 4 groups of 4. It's basically a grid. I can put sounds at any spot on the grid. I divide it evenly into quarters. Here in lies my question.

At 100BPM (for simplicity's sake), I can play singles with one hand for each of the 16 divisions. Are these 16ths? If so, does that make the single stroke roll 32nds and doubles 64ths?

My thinking is this: I divide the one meter into 4 evenly spaced notes, that's quarters, 8 notes is eighths, and a full grid is 16ths. Is this correct?
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
Man, all that is so simple, you can learn it in less than 10 minutes and never have doubts again, TAKE A LESSON.

Best regards!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Man, all that is so simple, you can learn it in less than 10 minutes and never have doubts again, TAKE A LESSON.

Best regards!
I've taken lessons. This thing doesn't have instructions, so I'm not sure how the breakdown works, that's all.

What I mean is: it plays 100 clicks per minute when I divide the grid. There are 4 on the screen before it cycles. That is 25 cycles per minute. I guess what I'm asking is dividing the whole meter (screen) into 4 the quarters, or is dividing the four sections into their 4 parts the quarters?
 

TMe

Senior Member
At 100BPM (for simplicity's sake), I can play singles with one hand for each of the 16 divisions. Are these 16ths?
It depends how you set your metronome. Find an actual song, figure out where the quarter notes are, and start from there. One person's 100bpm might be 100 16th notes per minute, it might be someone else's quarter notes per minute. Your math is correct, but you need to know what the starting "beat" (metronome click) corresponds to.

When I hear "104 bpm" I'm thinking of a quick 2/4 punk tune with the metronome set to half notes. Someone else thinks of a moderate marching tempo with the metronome set to quarter notes. To someone else that sounds painfully slow because he'd set the metronome to 208 to hear the same march tempo in eighth notes.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Yes they are sixteenths. Sixteenths are named after the fraction of a whole note, which is 4 beats long. So there are 4 sixteenths in each beat. There are exceptions at very high or very slow tempos, but around 100bpm your grid is standard sixteenths.
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
I've taken lessons. This thing doesn't have instructions, so I'm not sure how the breakdown works, that's all.

What I mean is: it plays 100 clicks per minute when I divide the grid. There are 4 on the screen before it cycles. That is 25 cycles per minute. I guess what I'm asking is dividing the whole meter (screen) into 4 the quarters, or is dividing the four sections into their 4 parts the quarters?
I did understand the question and know the answer of course.

You don¨t need instructions, it¨s about Music Theory your question.

Best regards!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Yes they are sixteenths. Sixteenths are named after the fraction of a whole note, which is 4 beats long. So there are 4 sixteenths in each beat. There are exceptions at very high or very slow tempos, but around 100bpm your grid is standard sixteenths.
This is what I want to say as well. Which means that you can play 32nd notes at 100 BPM, if you can play the 16ths with one hand.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
It really depends on how you feel the pulse of a particular rhythm.

For regular rock I think of it in 4/4. Consider how most songs are counted off: "one two three four!" It's logical that the count is the duration of one measure. More often than not it matches up so the two and four are where your back beat will land (two back beats per measure). So, your BPM is in terms of quarter notes. A standard hi hat groove would be eighths, and a single stroke roll sixteenths.

Now, most of the music I play is in cut time which throws the aforementioned paragraph out the window...
 
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TMe

Senior Member
For regular rock I think of it in 4/4. Consider how most songs are counted off: "one two three four!".... Now, most of the music I play is in cut time which throws the aforementioned paragraph out the window...
Exactly. Even if the music is in 4/4, a drummer might not want a click on every quarter note (1 2 3 4). A lot of metal guys would like 8 clicks per bar. Some would want only two. So when we say 100bpm, what note value is the "b" in bpm?

That's why I'm baffled when rudimental guys say they're playing inverted gerschmingies at 208 bpm. What does that mean? Is that my 104? Is the writer a new-bee, or a champeen snare drummer?
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Exactly. Even if the music is in 4/4, a drummer might not want a click on every quarter note (1 2 3 4). A lot of metal guys would like 8 clicks per bar. Some would want only two. So when we say 100bpm, what note value is the "b" in bpm?

That's why I'm baffled when rudimental guys say they're playing inverted gerschmingies at 208 bpm. What does that mean? Is that my 104? Is the writer a new-bee, or a champeen snare drummer?
200 is not 100 no..........

I play metal and a lot of fast rudiments. when I say 200 I mean 200........ Go to any online metronome and set the BPM to 200 or 208. Its fast. Those are 1/4 notes (most of the time)........ so if I am playing 16th notes would be 4 hits per pulse it's no different than someone playing 4 16th notes at 100 bpm. It's just twice as fast as the click is twice as fast. ... when there is a song at 240/260 bpm it is really fast. No metal drummer at this speed would want 8 clicks per bar, that would almost be a constant hum. if anything i'd rather half time the click, which would essentially sound like 100 bpm.

when I am playing rudiments I'm no drum corps guy and tend to hover in the 180 range. that is still really fast for me. but once again. 16th notes.

Your thinking subdivision........ I can play the same thing with a metronome at 100 or 200. but that is changing subdivisions to do that. an 1/8 note at 100 bpm would just be a 16th note at 200 if i was playing the exact same thing.

The best way to understand this is play 16th notes or even 1/8 notes, or triplets at 100, then 110, then 120, then 130, then 140 and so on. you speed up a bit each time until you are playing twice as fast at 200.

TO OP. just set the click and go to an online metronome and sync up the speeds to confirm your answer.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
TO OP. just set the click and go to an online metronome and sync up the speeds to confirm your answer.
That's what I ended up doing. It is in fact 25 cycles, 100 clicks, as I thought. Just threw me because of how it's laid out. Never actually watched the click before. New technology, brain stuck in the past, I got it now!
 

TMe

Senior Member
...when I am playing rudiments I'm no drum corps guy and tend to hover in the 180 range. that is still really fast for me. but once again. 16th notes.
Check out the link below. It includes rudiment tempos required to get through a university level drum program.

If you're playing rudiments around 180, you have speed that's far beyond what's required to get through that program, and you're pretty quick.

https://percussion.music.unt.edu/sites/default/files/Snare syllabi template fall 2018 updated 0928.pdf
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Except for double stroke roll level 2. 132 BPM 32nd notes? that is 264 bpm at 16ths if I am reading that correctly. WOW!

This is pretty cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
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