Question about " Is 4 pcs setup enough? "

Baturalp

Junior Member
Hello drummer world. This is my first post.
I have a 4 piece drum kit (22-12-14-14s). And I am going to buy a new kit. 1 month ago i wanted to buy 5 or 6 piece setup but now i understand I am so comfortable in this setup and ride place.
Is 4 piece setup is enough for improve and play ?
Is there any problem in professional drum life ?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Hello drummer world. This is my first post.
I have a 4 piece drum kit (22-12-14-14s). And I am going to buy a new kit. 1 month ago i wanted to buy 5 or 6 piece setup but now i understand I am so comfortable in this setup and ride place.
Is 4 piece setup is enough for improve and play ?
Is there any problem in professional drum life ?
To answer your questions:

Yes
No

Welcome to the forum
 
I've never had a problem with a 4. It's mainly about what you feel comfortable playing and if you feel you need more drums. If you feel comfortable with a 4, stick with it!
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I went from a very large setup to four drums, and I love it. It has refocused me on the groove and the feel of my playing - stuff that was getting lost in all the moving parts.

Look at how many drummers use four-pieces primarily. I mean, Ringo Starr and Charlie Watts use a four-piece and I don't think they have struggled professionally.
 

Zero Mercury Drummer

Senior Member
I would say yes. When you first start playing the urge is to add new sounds. The more experienced you get, you learn you can get a lot of different sounds out of one drum.
Example- hitting a 10" tom on the edge, using the rim, to get a timbale sound. Or hitting a floor tom right in the center and letting it boom for a fat sound.
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
If you buy a 5 or 6 pc you can always revert to a 4 pc., if need be. The inverse is not true.
But, yes, 3 pc and snare are OK...for now...
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Two cents from an old dog....

If your current kit is in good shape and decent quality, good heads, lugs, etc.
I would turn my focus to cymbals... Build a versatile kit that fits the music you are playing-and would like to play. Included in that is a good cymbal bag/case, and a quality hi-hat stand....

Assuming you want to play "out" at some point next I would invest in a full set of quality cases for your drums and hardware...

Add a well stocked stick bag with an extra hi hat clutch and a few spare parts and I can't think of anything that would hold you back from being successful except a bad attitude or lack of practice...

Now if your kit really isn't up to the task then by all means...start looking at good quality USED kits and cymbals and go from there.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
A bare minimum of 19 drums (preferably white & with large badges) plus a rock riser is necessary for almost every playing situation ;)
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
If you buy a 5 or 6 pc you can always revert to a 4 pc., if need be. The inverse is not true.
But, yes, 3 pc and snare are OK...for now...

Ya - it can be easier to get more pieces up front, and leave some out when needed or wanted.
If you get a 4 piece, and decide after they're discontinued that you want more drums with a matching finish, it can be a problem.

That said, it seems a large percentage of people use 4 pc. kits nowadays.
Use whatever you're comfortable with.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I'd pair it down one more tom-so just a 14 snare and 14 floor tom. Less to carry. People get all too busy with them so why tempt fate-I mean if you've got 3-6 toms looking at you they are begging to be whacked whether it's really needed or not. On second thought dump the 14 tom and get a 13 in tom. Just one odd tom. Yeah I like that I'm one odd tom cat too.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
The question is, do they give you what you need in order to do the gig in a way your satisfied with.

For me the answer is usually a bigger kit, my standard 6-piece. The reason is that the variations in styles, arrangements and instrumentation needs those various pitches to sound right, giving me a sort of jazz, rock, allround kit in one.

I don't really like dragging stuff around though, so if I can do it comfortable with less I do. Having more drums doesn't always mean unsing or even bringing them all. It's just options.

10,14, 18/20 is fine for many things, but doesn't work for everything.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
It does depend on the style of band and the music.
My main kit is 5pce, but I play 4pce for most cover band gigs. Some acoustic guitar based shows I play 2pce. I love having the ride cymbal in front of my right arm instead of away to the right.

I'm learning a 70's tribute show at the moment, and will need the extra tom for some of the signature fills in those songs. But realistically, almost no-one would notice if I played those fills on two toms instead of 3-4.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
Indeed. Raising a glass for good ol' Sticks now. Can we invite him back on a day pass to stir things up a bit? He could be the salsa of dw for a day.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
It's nice to have a little kit that is easier to transport. 4 pieces is good for lots of gigs. Another thing to consider is size of the bass drum. Some kits have 16 inch bass drums, they sound OK for some gigs. Bands might want you to have a small kit because there isn't much room on stage.

It's OK to have more than one drum kit.
 

iwearnohats

Silver Member
I play a kit which at its full size is 9 pieces (4 toms, 2 snares, 1 kick, 2 concert toms) with something like 13 cymbals, cowbell and tambourine.

But my hardware is set up so that I can reduce this down to any configuration I desire.

Personally I've always preferred having at least a 5-piece kit. I feel having only two toms limits the 'vocabulary' of the kit. I mean, the reality is that you can have as many drums as you like but you don't have to hit any of them.

Lately I've had to learn a variety of pop music with electronic sounds, and having a larger kit has made it much easier to create acoustic approximations.

So while it's all well and good to play with a small, basic kit, and they're great for portability, eventually you may find yourself limited by the kit rather than your own creativity and it's good to be able to expand or shrink as needed based on the gig.

Plus it can sometimes be entertaining seeing sound engineers get annoyed because they don't bring enough mics for anything bigger than a 4-piece kit :).
 
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