Question About Drums in High Heat/Humidity

Chunkaway

Silver Member
Question - when living in a relatively high heat/humidity locale such as Florida, or even Far East (Hong Kong, Bangkok), should you avoid owning a wrapped kit, or does it not matter? (Assuming you are not playing in direct sunlight for extended periods of time.)

Thanks for any insights.
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
Well, you should keep away from the acrylic kits, as the post below will indicate.

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93450

Metal is more stable than wood for heat expansion, but metal drums are more expensive and only a few choices outside of snare drums. The wrap in the heat would eventually dislodge from the shells under continuous extreme heat conditions. But, we are talking extremes in heat. If you want to evaluate your choice over years of playing, then go with a thick wooden shell that has a finish instead of a wrap.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well, you should keep away from the acrylic kits, as the post below will indicate.

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93450

Metal is more stable than wood for heat expansion, but metal drums are more expensive and only a few choices outside of snare drums. The wrap in the heat would eventually dislodge from the shells under continuous extreme heat conditions. But, we are talking extremes in heat. If you want to evaluate your choice over years of playing, then go with a thick wooden shell that has a finish instead of a wrap.
+1 on this advice. However, the important thing with the humidity is to let the drums ease through the transitions. If you leave your drums in a hot car, and then immediately move them into a cool room, condensation will build up. My drums (both wood lacquered) live in a patio room that gets very hot during the summer, but it never gets humid in there and they just heat up with the room, and slowly cool off as the day goes on. It's when the changes happen too fast for the wood to acclimate I think is when problems arise. Keep them out of direct sunlight and keep them dry.
 
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