question about bpm software

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Well, if there's no reference point, then I fail to see the point... Playing with others unfortunately isn't immediate adjustment by the whole band when you slow down or speed up. I think that if there was something that could attempt to keep you in the "target zone" of plus/minus a few bpm of the original recording, that would be interesting.
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
I find LiveBPM a useful way of ensuring that I stay at (or close to) my target BPM.

There's always some drift, so I only use it if we're playing a song that one or more band members feel is changing tempo. The difficulty that I have with it is that it gets difficult to just refer to it from time to time, and I think that playing with reference to it all the time trains one to rely on an outside meter instead of the internal meter.
 

Merlin5

Gold Member
R
Well, if there's no reference point, then I fail to see the point... Playing with others unfortunately isn't immediate adjustment by the whole band when you slow down or speed up. I think that if there was something that could attempt to keep you in the "target zone" of plus/minus a few bpm of the original recording, that would be interesting.


Well, the reference point is the beginning tempo. After that, you can judge by how many bpm you've slowed down or sped up the song or metronome. There isn't the safety net of the song (playing to track at home) staying in tempo and you just catch up. If you drag on a gig, chances are the band will slow down with you.

By the song changing tempo with you it's exactly like a live playing situation if you happen to drag or rush. So you then have to practise enough so that you minimise or eliminate these kind of tempo changes.

Well it makes sense to me anyway! Lol.


Alright here's an example. I had been learning an original song for a gig recently. The tempo is 60bpm, it's a ballad, and they used a drum machine. I played along to the mp3 of the song regularly on my vdrums. No problem, locked in with it. But when I listened back to the recording of the gig, my average tempo was 55 to 56. It felt a bit draggy. Had the mp3 actually slowed down with me, I would have known this could happen and tried to correct it. I would know how much more I need to push to keep it more buoyant and not lay back too much.
 
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