Question about Adler/Rich book

ZackP

Junior Member
I am wondering why there are two discs, one with bounce and one without. Can someone discuss what that entails? Is it about just using on my wrist strokes and then also utilizing rebound?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Are you referring to "Buddy Rich's Modern Interpretation of Snare Drum Rudiments"? If so, which version?
I'm gonna assume (hate doing that) that it is. I studied with Ted back in like 92-93, something like that. We used this book, just an older version. Each rudiment is done with only wrist, and slowly. Over and over. Once the rudiment is learned (muscle memory, unable to forget), it is then relearned with bounce only. I don't know if this is what the discs provide, but this is how I learned. After just wrists, then just bounce, movement and other ideas are applied. Like how to move the rudiments around the kit to create fills and solos. The Adler technique is the last step (maybe not now, this was like 30 years ago), which is a pinching technique. I can't really explain it well. It's like having the stick between your thumb and pointer finger, and squeezing it to get the bounce. It works well, and is a very limited movement technique. Actually, that's how it works. Wrists is most movement, fingers is smaller movement, Adler technique is the least movement.

If this isn't the book you are referring to ignore this post. I hope it is. This book is the 💩💩💩!
 
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ZackP

Junior Member
I'm gonna assume (hate doing that) that it is. I studied with Ted back in like 92-93, something like that. We used this book, just an older version. Each rudiment is done with only wrist, and slowly. Over and over. Once the rudiment is learned (muscle memory, unable to forget), it is then relearned with bounce only. I don't know if this is what the discs provide, but this is how I learned. After just wrists, then just bounce, movement and other ideas are applied. Like how to move the rudiments around the kit to create fills and solos. The Adler technique is the last step (maybe not now, this was like 30 years ago), which is a pinching technique. I can't really explain it well. It's like having the stick between your thumb and pointer finger, and squeezing it to get the bounce. It works well, and is a very limited movement technique. Actually, that's how it works. Wrists is most movement, fingers is smaller movement, Adler technique is the least movement.

If this isn't the book you are referring to ignore this post. I hope it is. This book is the 💩💩💩!
I was talking about that book. I found this video and am pretty sure it’s what I’m asking about.
it also seems like there’s a Roy Burns book about this. Have you used it and seen if it’s similar?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I have no idea about the Roy Burns book, or if it follows the same technique ideas.

Ted's book is fabulous. It isn't much compared to the others, it's pretty basic. But if you go through the book each way I described, it gives you 3 different options to do the same thing. The beauty part is each part gets faster. It may not seem like it at first, but when you use the Adler technique (pinch) it's so much faster than but seems pretty normal speed wise. It's in the usage that lets you know how it really works.
 
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