Queit good ride cymbal

Auspicious

Well-known member
o_O

Many different opinions 😮 it is real gold here.

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@dajazz they don't have the traditional line on the Dream's website, Is it a discontinued line ?
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Yes, but drums played ”quietly” is still ”loud” to our ears. My 22” bosphorus was very light 1900grams.
I mean soft and loud relative to the musical settings they will be used in. The OP wanted a cymbal that would be easy to play with an acoustic combo. What's soft or loud in absolute terms is another conversation altogether.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
@dajazz do you have by any chances, a video of you playing on that loud ride?

Because a cymbal is not really a quiet thing in life, perhaps your pianist just don't like the sound of it. Personally I deeply believe in the advice of trying different sticks, check out this very basic video of mine, trying my ride with a heavier stick and a lighter stick.

-Inovative percussion IP-LD 63g each sticks and a fairly large round bead tip.
-Zildjian 7A Hickory 45g per sticks also with a round tip.

The difference is huge and the sound produced by the cymbal is considerably lower with the 7As, everything is different.

Auspicious - 2 different sticks, same ride
 

Jazzim

Active member
The right terms should be do you want, cymbals that are loud, or cymbals that are extremely loud.

I just feel it funny, when people say these and these drums are ”quiet” or cymbals that are ”quiet”..
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I guess I don't understand the reasoning for using an arbitrary, non-musical definition of quiet to describe a musical instrument.

Leaving aside that the instrument is only as loud as you play it. Like I have a couple of dozen cymbals here in my studio making no sound at all right now.
 

dajazz

Member
Hey guys I'm glad you revitalized this thread, I've sold the cymbal years ago and now I'm very much in love with a brand called Impressions, I have 2 20" and they're exquisite, one is 1680 grams (traditional line) and the other 1650 (dry jazz or something) also a while ago I scored a light 16" crash/ride by instambul pre split I believe, amazing for bebop jazz, bossa and anything quiet and jazzy and believe me, they really make a difference.

Some often say it's your hands, it's your technique and I agree partially is but I'm sure none of them will use a 22" heavy 2002 Paiste ride in a small venue with a jazz combo.

I come to find that even cymbals around the 2000 g mark are really too loud for what I play, I have a few I rarely use for instance a 22 by instanbul mehmet legend dark which is around 2200 g that I rarely use cause it's simply too loud, even if it's on the light side, it really overdrowns the double bass and the piano, not ideal.

On the same note I really can't get along with 22s much do any of you guys use it in jazz quartet/quintet/trio? I just find them best in fusion or big band as the volumes there can be a bit louder overall.
Do you guys know of any 50s/60s jazz drummer that used one? I believe they're not very common but I would like to be proven wrong.
 

Jazzim

Active member
Hey guys I'm glad you revitalized this thread, I've sold the cymbal years ago and now I'm very much in love with a brand called Impressions, I have 2 20" and they're exquisite, one is 1680 grams (traditional line) and the other 1650 (dry jazz or something) also a while ago I scored a light 16" crash/ride by instambul pre split I believe, amazing for bebop jazz, bossa and anything quiet and jazzy and believe me, they really make a difference.

Some often say it's your hands, it's your technique and I agree partially is but I'm sure none of them will use a 22" heavy 2002 Paiste ride in a small venue with a jazz combo.

I come to find that even cymbals around the 2000 g mark are really too loud for what I play, I have a few I rarely use for instance a 22 by instanbul mehmet legend dark which is around 2200 g that I rarely use cause it's simply too loud, even if it's on the light side, it really overdrowns the double bass and the piano, not ideal.

On the same note I really can't get along with 22s much do any of you guys use it in jazz quartet/quintet/trio? I just find them best in fusion or big band as the volumes there can be a bit louder overall.
Do you guys know of any 50s/60s jazz drummer that used one? I believe they're not very common but I would like to be proven wrong.
I think, actually in a modern day, many jazz drummers go for the 22” size, because of the lower pitch.

The cymbal volume is not tied to the gram weight. I had that Peter Erskine left side ride at one point, it was ~2500grams for a 20” it wasn’t ”loud cymbal”. Many ”paper” thin crashes can be really loud, and they are probably thinnest cymbals, manufactured widely in a modern day.
 

dajazz

Member
I think, actually in a modern day, many jazz drummers go for the 22” size, because of the lower pitch.

The cymbal volume is not tied to the gram weight. I had that Peter Erskine left side ride at one point, it was ~2500grams for a 20” it wasn’t ”loud cymbal”. Many ”paper” thin crashes can be really loud, and they are probably thinnest cymbals, manufactured widely in a modern day.
I guess I have not come across many 22" that will fit the job, has anyone tried a 22" particoularly tamed ride cymbal? I would love to explore more 22s :)
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
I have to install tape + felt on my 22" to tame it, it's a matter or overtones and undertones.. with the tape the cymbals is much dryer.. I see it as more tamed like that.

It's just experimental in my case, I am lacking the experience to really tell what is good or not.
 

Jazzim

Active member
I guess I have not come across many 22" that will fit the job, has anyone tried a 22" particoularly tamed ride cymbal? I would love to explore more 22s :)
Like mentioned earlier on this thread. Try Bosphorus master or master vintage 22"
 
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