Pulling apart a Tama hi hat stand

BassDriver

Silver Member
I have a Tama Roadpro Hi-hat Stand (HH75WN)

Its parts are shown in this diagram:
http://www.tamadrum.co.jp/world/parts/hardware/page/HH75WN.html

I want to know how to remove the chain assembly from the lower pull rod.

I also want to know how to remove the lower pull rod and spring assembly from the hi hat stand.

I have been using an adjustable wrench to try to loosen the chain assembly but the lower pull rod keeps turning (instead of staying still) and so I have no leverage to turn any nut.

BTW I was baffled trying to find out how the lower pull rod and spring assembly would actually be installed in the first place.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I have a Tama Roadpro Hi-hat Stand (HH75WN)

Its parts are shown in this diagram:
http://www.tamadrum.co.jp/world/parts/hardware/page/HH75WN.html

I want to know how to remove the chain assembly from the lower pull rod.

I also want to know how to remove the lower pull rod and spring assembly from the hi hat stand.

I have been using an adjustable wrench to try to loosen the chain assembly but the lower pull rod keeps turning (instead of staying still) and so I have no leverage to turn any nut.

BTW I was baffled trying to find out how the lower pull rod and spring assembly would actually be installed in the first place.
I used this exact same stand for 20 years and it is a good piece of hardware.

You will need to get some basic tools. A bench top vise will be necessary to hold the pull rod still while you loosen the rest of the mechanism. Don't use adjustable wrenches because they will change size and strip nuts. Get a decent set of box end and open end wrenches. You can get this stuff cheap on Craigslist or Harbor Freight tools and these tools will be useful for all kinds of things.

Why do you need to remove the chain assembly? Really, there is no reason to take it completely apart. Occasional disassembly will be needed for cleaning but it sounds like you are trying to take apart things that don't need to be taken apart unless broken.
 

BassDriver

Silver Member
I used this exact same stand for 20 years and it is a good piece of hardware.
Great piece of hardware. I like how I can unscrew to upper pull rod and conceal it in the tube for transport - avoids damage.

You will need to get some basic tools. A bench top vise will be necessary to hold the pull rod still while you loosen the rest of the mechanism. Don't use adjustable wrenches because they will change size and strip nuts. Get a decent set of box end and open end wrenches. You can get this stuff cheap on Craigslist or Harbor Freight tools and these tools will be useful for all kinds of things.
Thanks. I realized I could not do anything with the simple tools I was using.

Why do you need to remove the chain assembly? Really, there is no reason to take it completely apart. Occasional disassembly will be needed for cleaning but it sounds like you are trying to take apart things that don't need to be taken apart unless broken.
I was trying to see if putting a small spring over the chain assembly (surrounding the bottom section of the pull rod) could slow down the closing motion of the hi-hat to the point where it will not "clunk" if I open the hi-hat. It seems that at the moment, the rubber ring above the chain assembly does no dampen enough to stop that "clunk".
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Great piece of hardware. I like how I can unscrew to upper pull rod and conceal it in the tube for transport - avoids damage.


Thanks. I realized I could not do anything with the simple tools I was using.


I was trying to see if putting a small spring over the chain assembly (surrounding the bottom section of the pull rod) could slow down the closing motion of the hi-hat to the point where it will not "clunk" if I open the hi-hat. It seems that at the moment, the rubber ring above the chain assembly does no dampen enough to stop that "clunk".
I had this stand for many years and it never occurred to me to keep the pull rod in the stand. I wish I had thought of that because I went through a number of rods due to bending over the years. Great idea.

There should be some way to adjust the tension of the spring that keeps the pull rod up. Maybe a knurled threaded washer. Look for that.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I was trying to see if putting a small spring over the chain assembly (surrounding the bottom section of the pull rod) could slow down the closing motion of the hi-hat to the point where it will not "clunk" if I open the hi-hat. It seems that at the moment, the rubber ring above the chain assembly does no dampen enough to stop that "clunk".
I know the clunk you speak of, it happens on other hihats stands. You can get a spring, or similar purpose device, on the chain by winding it on by hand, without removing the entire chain assembly. A spring is basically a coiled wire. You start at one end of the spring, where it opens up, and wind slowly coil by coil until all the coil is wound on. You may have to deform the spring a bit, and in end might not look the same, but it should wind on. Only a few coils of a decent sized/gauged spring need be wound on to do the job.
 

BassDriver

Silver Member
I know the clunk you speak of, it happens on other hihats stands. You can get a spring, or similar purpose device, on the chain by winding it on by hand, without removing the entire chain assembly. A spring is basically a coiled wire. You start at one end of the spring, where it opens up, and wind slowly coil by coil until all the coil is wound on. You may have to deform the spring a bit, and in end might not look the same, but it should wind on. Only a few coils of a decent sized/gauged spring need be wound on to do the job.
Thanks. I had thought about coiling on a spring it but could not find a spring that I could coil onto the hi-hat (atleast with any ease).

I know the hi-hat came with spurs with springs looped around them, those springs are the right width but I may have to manipulate one of those springs more (like with pliers) to open it up far enough.

There should be some way to adjust the tension of the spring that keeps the pull rod up. Maybe a knurled threaded washer. Look for that.
There is a notched wheel I can turn to adjust spring tension but even on the lowest setting that annoying clunk still happens.
 

DangerousDave

Senior Member
I see this is an old thread but WTH.
I have a Tama HH45R. It's almost like Roadpro but without the footboard height adjustment.
I was also having trouble with the clunking sound even at the lowest tension so I pulled the spring out. Next, I heated it on the stove and extended it a bit then quickly put it in cold water.
Next thing you know, I have a non-clunking HH stand that works great. The top cymbal now actually moves in a more fluid manner and I can still control the tension.

Cheers!
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
I see this is an old thread but WTH.
I have a Tama HH45R. It's almost like Roadpro but without the footboard height adjustment.
I was also having trouble with the clunking sound even at the lowest tension so I pulled the spring out. Next, I heated it on the stove and extended it a bit then quickly put it in cold water.
Next thing you know, I have a non-clunking HH stand that works great. The top cymbal now actually moves in a more fluid manner and I can still control the tension.

Cheers!

If you have the stand apart, just change the spring(s). Hardware stores have springs, go lighter.

Something I do if the spring is too tight (at the lowest setting) is flip the rod over, the top nut on the lower rod will fit on the bottom, you're just switching ends, top becomes bottom and vice versa.

The stop crimp for the spring(s) is not in the middle of the rod (altho it looks that way in the diagram). Flipping the rod repositions the rods spring crimp giving it more travel, doesn't compress the spring as much resulting in a lighter feel, no clunk.
 

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DangerousDave

Senior Member
If you have the stand apart, just change the spring(s). Hardware stores have springs, go lighter.

Something I do if the spring is too tight (at the lowest setting) is flip the rod over, the top nut on the lower rod will fit on the bottom, you're just switching ends, top becomes bottom and vice versa.

The stop crimp for the spring(s) is not in the middle of the rod (altho it looks that way in the diagram). Flipping the rod repositions the rods spring crimp giving it more travel, doesn't compress the spring as much resulting in a lighter feel, no clunk.
It probably isn't in the middle of the rod.

Tama HH75W and HH45R have springs that extend. But I forgot how the rod is connected to a spring: It could be a slight increase of rod diameter or a crimp. Memory doesn't serve me THAT well and it's a bit late to check the diagrams :)
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
It probably isn't in the middle of the rod.

Tama HH75W and HH45R have springs that extend. But I forgot how the rod is connected to a spring: It could be a slight increase of rod diameter or a crimp. Memory doesn't serve me THAT well and it's a bit late to check the diagrams :)

No, the crimp isn't in the middle of the rod. The crimps position on the rod allows the rod to be flipped producing a lighter feel. Same threads on both ends of the rod, so nut can be flipped.

They wouldn't waste the time/money tapering a HH rod, its crimped.

Here's an eBay listing for a TAMA lower rod, you can clearly see the crimp. Compression action on the spring.
 

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Shamani

Member
I lowered the foot board on my roadpro hi-hat stand today and had the same problem. The spring tension was far greater than what I wanted (I should say I lowered the foot board as far as it would go with the adjuster skrew backed almost all the way out then clamped in place).

So I took the bottom rod out to see if flipping it would give me the reduced tension I wanted. It tuns out it must have been flipped already because the long side was already on the bottom (The crimp is 3/8" off center FYI). I was thinking I would just get a smaller or softer spring to replace it, but then I realized the spring is actually made with two springs slipped over a rubber coupler in the middle. I found a piece of aluminum tubing with a 1/2" inside and 5/8" outside diameter and cut a 3/4" long section which I then slipped onto the rubber coupler. Which effectively shortened the spring assembly by 1 1/2". When I put it all together the tension was just right and the pedal board was at a low enough angle I can comfortably keep my foot on it with the hi-hats open.



here is the spring assembly in two pieces and the aluminum tube next to it.



And here is the assembly together with the now extra spring net to it.

 

DangerousDave

Senior Member
It's been awhile...
Here's what I found out.
Yesterday I got a HH75 and it has a totally different spring mechanism than HH45R. It has, as you may know already, two springs that COMPRESS when you press the footplate. The HH45R has one spring that EXPANDS when footplate is pressed.

HH75 didn't have clunking sound when set on a lowest tension setting but if I went with lighter hats it would clunk. So I took one spring, heated it with a lighter and compressed it a few milimeters and put in cold water. Again, it works without flaws.
 
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