Pros vs. Average Joe's

bigd

Silver Member
Curious as to what do you believe separates the professional drummer from the average joe drummer ? I'm not talking about luck being at the right place right time. I'm talking playing wise. What are the essential playing elements that are superior in the professional?
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
I've no idea. I'm a professional drummer and I know plenty of hobbyists who could play circles around me... yet here I am, paying the bills by playing the gigs.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
I think that most professional drummers know how to get along with others. They exercise diplomacy and know that business and art sometimes require personal "sacrifices" in order to put the band, the artist and the music in the best possible light. Work ethic is a huge plus also. That's not to say your Average Joe doesn't have any of those qualities, but knowing how to be part of a team and bringing something constructive to the table is essential.
 

Three

Senior Member
Timing
Tone
Technique
Taste
Turning up on Time
Total ease with sight reading
Terrific sounding tom-toms....
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Really, it comes to confidence.

Many records and gigs one only needs to know a handful of beats and a few fills to play what is required. Most anyone beyond a beginner could technically play the required beats in many musical situations.

But the pros bring that level of confidence and swagger that they can walk into a session, and lay it down in just a few takes. Or walk on stage with little to no rehearsal and nail the parts. It seems to be more of a mental ability to just perform, and perform well, no matter the circumstance. And as noted, be able to get along with everyone while doing so, even in difficult situations.
 

MileHighDrummer

Senior Member
To me it's the same difference that separates the "professional" in any special skills group. Professional athlete, musician, singer, lawyer, doctor ... The signs of a true professional (to me) is someone who- possesses the training, knowledge, skills, equipment, drive, ability - and then does it. Going to law school doesn't make you a lawyer - practicing law makes you a lawyer. Doing your job, and getting paid for it, makes you a professional.
 

NerfLad

Silver Member
Along with the (mostly) great answers already in the thread I'd like to add historical perspective. It deepens you as a player (and a human being) in ways that will surprise you.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Obviously plenty of overlap between the two groups.

Pros need good time and tone, understand song forms and be able to to put their ego and impulses aside for the sake of the total performance. Others must want to play with you, and these are the qualities many look for. For hobbyists, these qualities are optional, depending on whatever ratbag peers you can rustle up :)
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Necessity.

I've known and worked with too many average Joe's who have possessed too many of the traits listed here as being purely the domain of the professional, to believe that it comes down to a lack of ability, willingness, desire or pay that separate the two groups. Too many of those traits are shared so often that the lines between the two groups are blurred. The musical skillset, understanding, knowledge, expectation, application and above all, attitude of many average Joe's that I know, can definitely rival those of a professional.

The difference between them is necessity. The average Joe isn't relying on those traits to pay the bills. The necessity to survive and thrive isn't nearly as paramount. The stakes aren't nearly as high, even if all else happens to be equal.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
... What are the essential playing elements that are superior in the professional?

Impossible to draw valid conclusions without comparing individuals, rather than groups.

In many cases, there could be no 'essential playing elements that are superior in the professional'.
Some average joes can play better than some pros, and vice-versa.

Edit: most of the responses, while good, don't address 'playing' elements.

.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
The ability to know what needs to be done and the generosity to give the other musicians, and the song, what they/it needs. Being authentic to whatever style you're playing, and flawless execution is expected.
 
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