Proper Music

wraub

Well-known member
Where I am, I (and most) live in shorts 9-10 months a year... It's just what's done.

That said, most here (not I) put on jackets when it gets below 60F. :rolleyes:

Similarly, I like older hip-hop and old-school rap, and old country.

Most music I overhear here is newer hip-hop or new country.

What I'm saying is that most people who aren't me like the wrong things. ;) :D



Living in the US Northeast, cargo shorts, or any shorts for that matter, year round is not an option unless you want to freeze your nuts off.
 

TMe

Senior Member
I was a teenager in the 70's. I'm not nostalgic, so I don't have much use for the music I listened to in high-school

As I explore new music, though (music that's new to me), I keep finding that I'm drawn to music from the 70's. I think it's because most recordings from the 70's are of high quality and sound like recordings of real instruments. Since the 80's, most recordings are so highly processed they don't sound like recordings of real bands anymore.

The same thing applies to all sorts of music. If I'm checking out Colombian Cumbia, Jamaican Reggae, whatever - it tends to peak in the 70's and then the cheesy studio effects and electronics start taking over. By the 90's, it all starts to sound like AM pop music.
 

tfgretsch

Junior Member
I was a teenager in the 70's. I'm not nostalgic, so I don't have much use for the music I listened to in high-school

As I explore new music, though (music that's new to me), I keep finding that I'm drawn to music from the 70's. I think it's because most recordings from the 70's are of high quality and sound like recordings of real instruments. Since the 80's, most recordings are so highly processed they don't sound like recordings of real bands anymore.

The same thing applies to all sorts of music. If I'm checking out Colombian Cumbia, Jamaican Reggae, whatever - it tends to peak in the 70's and then the cheesy studio effects and electronics start taking over. By the 90's, it all starts to sound like AM pop music.
Good Point !
 

Armor of Light

Senior Member
I was a 70's/80's cusp person...

in my early days, I had a steady diet of classical and hippie stuff from my mom's side of the family, and jazz from my dad's side. The first music I remember playing on drums was Dave Brubeck, a ton of Motown stuff, with the J 5 and Temptations being the most memorable. My first concert ever was the Jackson 5 either in 75 or 76...

my friends older brothers got me into Styx, Rush and Kansas. One fateful day, my freind and I were popping around the newly acquired Qube cable box his parents had just installed, and we came across this video of a huge lighted stage set, with 5 guys in spandex and studs, and this awesome drum beat going...next, the guitar and bass came in, and then the words: "The white man came, Across the sea...." Iron Maiden on the young MTV...I literally remember saying out loud to my friend "that is what I want to be"...that was it. The defining moment. He still lives in the house (bought from his parents years ago) and we still talk about that day b/c he said I just stood there for the whole video with my mouth open...

I feel like that cusp era was the seminal time for lots of what we know now...but that is most likely because of the warm fuzzies I get from thinking about that era
Same here..but [Big Band Swing - Jazz - Wrathchild - Radio]. The 70's music (classic rock on radio included) is awesome to play and I'm proud to be old(er) now and still rock the shit out of it. I dig your Minor Threat sheep..!
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I think the issue here is that people have to look for music themselves now (even though it's much more easy to access it) rather than have somebody else curate it, i.e. a radio DJ or station.

Some of the best music that I have in my collection and listen to regularly has been made in the last five years. I've just had to expend my own brainpower and energy to look for it.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Research shows that people will always love and respect the music from their teen years, up to their late 20's. After that, they don't really get attached to new songs. Everyone says "that don't make music like they used to" and refer to whatever decade they grew up in.

It does bother me when I'm playing in a band and the entire song list could have been a gig from the 80's. Surely some decent live music has happened since then?
On the other hand, my main cover band tries to equally cover every decade from the 60's to the 10's, but if its an older audience they just don't know the newer songs.
One last observation - after the Queen and Elton John movies last year, all the older teenagers at school love those artists. So some music probably does have universal appeal.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
70s music is great. Lots of really upbeat, happy music. I don't really see how people, especially drummers, don't like disco. It has tons of hooky beats and grooves. People like to dance to it. That screams drummer to me.

The clothes are horrid. Stuff of nightmares.
Yep. The best of disco is actually funk - and beneath the glitter it's ballsy, groovy compelling, sometimes sublime, stuff (Earth Wind and Fire, Chic, Rose Royce, nuff said?). My great drumming inspiration (Get a groove and KEEP it) and the best dance music there has ever been and will ever be.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
See, this is the problem. Everybody is listening to the same stuff they have been for the last 40 years and rallies against new music. The issue being that there is plenty of fantastic new music out there if people would just open their ears for half an hour. The music industry isn't dying guys, it's changing.

Personally I think the 70s is the second-most miserable decade of them all. Only surpassed by the 80s. But I'm British and we didn't exactly cover ourselves with glory.
I deeply disagree about the 80s!
The last great blast of British music - hugely fresh, creative and DIY in spirit. Echo and the Bunnymen, XTC, Squeeze, Tears For Fears, Simple Minds, Teardrop Explodes, Altered Images, Spandau Ballet, Aztec Camera, Cocteau Twins, Smiths? Yep, even Duran Duran. Camahn, wassamader wi ya? ;)
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
I was a teenager in the 70's. I'm not nostalgic, so I don't have much use for the music I listened to in high-school

As I explore new music, though (music that's new to me), I keep finding that I'm drawn to music from the 70's. I think it's because most recordings from the 70's are of high quality and sound like recordings of real instruments. Since the 80's, most recordings are so highly processed they don't sound like recordings of real bands anymore.

The same thing applies to all sorts of music. If I'm checking out Colombian Cumbia, Jamaican Reggae, whatever - it tends to peak in the 70's and then the cheesy studio effects and electronics start taking over. By the 90's, it all starts to sound like AM pop music.
There's a band called Nirvana you should check out.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I actually have an open mind for new music. I'm kind of hungry to take in music I haven't heard before and fortunately I have a 17 year old who not only listens to the music of my youth, is also listening to a ton of new music. He has introduced me to Thundercat, who we actually had the pleasure of seeing when he opened for Herbie Hancock a couple months ago at The Beacon Theater. And last night he and I were listening to some music by Domi and JD Beck. Now, I realize that those are only two examples and are not representative of all the new music out there. But my reaction to both of what I have heard from them is that it appears to me that there seems to be an attempt to play as many notes as possible at as fast a speed as possible. In fact, when I took my son to see Stanley Clarke at The Blue Note about a year ago he had a very young band with him and the drummer's approach to the drums was similar. As many notes (or hits) as can be squeezed into the music as possible. Translation, I just can't get into it. To my ear, the drumming seems rigid, metronomic and overly busy, seemingly for the sake of being busy. Clearly these people all have insane chops and technical ability. As a means of comparison, I have admit, much to some people's shock, I always found Billy Cobham to have this kind of sound. I have several Mahavishnu albums with him on them as well as several of his solo albums. Some of them I really like a lot. But if I were to say who I prefer with Mahavishnu, Cobham or Narada, I much prefer Narada. Where am I going with this? Not sure. Except to say that what my son has exposed me to just seems to me to be too frenetic. I'm not a fan of elevator music mind you. Far from it. But it seems to me that space and less is more is not something that many of the younger players are embodying these days. Do I have this all wrong? Quite probably. I'm open to thoughts. Bash me even. I can take it. And I might even not only listen but be able to be influenced by other points of vew. Peace.
same here...I add at least 2-3 new artists every day to my Spotify follow list.

Looking back, I think 1969 was THE absolute best year in rock music, and continued through the 70s.

You mentioned CCR: Three phenomenal albums in that one year of 1969!
Moody Blues: Two phenomenal albums in that year too!

Plus all the other great rock bands were making fantastic music then.
I was born that year!! Probably a blemish on the music world though...
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Same here..but [Big Band Swing - Jazz - Wrathchild - Radio]. The 70's music (classic rock on radio included) is awesome to play and I'm proud to be old(er) now and still rock the shit out of it.
same here...I play along to my old stuff at least once a week...and the new stuff as well

I dig your Minor Threat sheep..!
hell yeah!!!
I can't keep up, I can't keep up
Out Of Step, with our "morals"
 

TMe

Senior Member
There's a band called Nirvana you should check out.
It's funny when people tell me how Rock music is still current and relevant, and they refer to a recording that's 30 years old. ;)

Yeah, there are exceptions of course, but not a whole lot. I wish more Rock bands could afford to do live albums. The live albums are almost always much better.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
Remember Grand Funk Railroad? They were a 70's band and I like them.

I have a love / hate relationship with disco though.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
I won't diss the skinny jean thing because there really isn't anything offensive about them. Definitely not my style, even if I could pull off wearing them, which I can't. I much prefer the old classic Levi's jeans of my youth. Sadly, even Levi's doesn't seem to be making their jeans like they used to. I have found that Gap makes jeans that are like my old Levi's. And their Straight cut is the one I prefer the most. My wife bought me three pairs. Straight, Athletic and Relaxed. The Relaxed make me look like an old man with a saggy ass. The Athletic are just too skinny for me. Just give me a classic cut pair of jeans and I'm a happy camper.
"Straight, Athletic and Relaxed" - good band name, sir!
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
It's funny when people tell me how Rock music is still current and relevant, and they refer to a recording that's 30 years old. ;)

Yeah, there are exceptions of course, but not a whole lot. I wish more Rock bands could afford to do live albums. The live albums are almost always much better.
Nah. YOU were talking about the 90s being all AM pop.
I can't help the 90s being 30yrs ago, sorry. ☺
 
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