Proper Music

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
See, this is the problem. Everybody is listening to the same stuff they have been for the last 40 years and rallies against new music. The issue being that there is plenty of fantastic new music out there if people would just open their ears for half an hour. The music industry isn't dying guys, it's changing.

Personally I think the 70s is the second-most miserable decade of them all. Only surpassed by the 80s. But I'm British and we didn't exactly cover ourselves with glory.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
See, this is the problem. Everybody is listening to the same stuff they have been for the last 40 years and rallies against new music. The issue being that there is plenty of fantastic new music out there if people would just open their ears for half an hour. The music industry isn't dying guys, it's changing.

Personally I think the 70s is the second-most miserable decade of them all. Only surpassed by the 80s. But I'm British and we didn't exactly cover ourselves with glory.
I think some of that is the music of our formative years becomes part of those memories-so you can't help but hold it with fondness. I agree we shouldn't discount everything past that, and we are still building memories-where once I was listening to Disney tunes withy my youngest daughter now I"m listening to Karmic Juggernaut and Mr. Bungle (she's got eclectic taste) as we drive in her Honda Fit.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I actually have an open mind for new music. I'm kind of hungry to take in music I haven't heard before and fortunately I have a 17 year old who not only listens to the music of my youth, is also listening to a ton of new music. He has introduced me to Thundercat, who we actually had the pleasure of seeing when he opened for Herbie Hancock a couple months ago at The Beacon Theater. And last night he and I were listening to some music by Domi and JD Beck. Now, I realize that those are only two examples and are not representative of all the new music out there. But my reaction to both of what I have heard from them is that it appears to me that there seems to be an attempt to play as many notes as possible at as fast a speed as possible. In fact, when I took my son to see Stanley Clarke at The Blue Note about a year ago he had a very young band with him and the drummer's approach to the drums was similar. As many notes (or hits) as can be squeezed into the music as possible. Translation, I just can't get into it. To my ear, the drumming seems rigid, metronomic and overly busy, seemingly for the sake of being busy. Clearly these people all have insane chops and technical ability. As a means of comparison, I have admit, much to some people's shock, I always found Billy Cobham to have this kind of sound. I have several Mahavishnu albums with him on them as well as several of his solo albums. Some of them I really like a lot. But if I were to say who I prefer with Mahavishnu, Cobham or Narada, I much prefer Narada. Where am I going with this? Not sure. Except to say that what my son has exposed me to just seems to me to be too frenetic. I'm not a fan of elevator music mind you. Far from it. But it seems to me that space and less is more is not something that many of the younger players are embodying these days. Do I have this all wrong? Quite probably. I'm open to thoughts. Bash me even. I can take it. And I might even not only listen but be able to be influenced by other points of vew. Peace.
 

Ruok

Silver Member
I personally prefer the 60'ties, when all happened : THE BEATLES - THE ROLLING STONES - OTIS REDDING - JIMI HENDRIX - The Cream - John Coltrane - The Who - KINKS - Creedence Clearwater - Wilson Pickett - The Shadows - to name a few
Looking back, I think 1969 was THE absolute best year in rock music, and continued through the 70s.

You mentioned CCR: Three phenomenal albums in that one year of 1969!
Moody Blues: Two phenomenal albums in that year too!

Plus all the other great rock bands were making fantastic music then.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I find myself admiring the music of my formative years more & more, yet I enjoy most of it less as each year passes - go figure.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I find myself admiring the music of my formative years more & more, yet I enjoy most of it less as each year passes - go figure.
It's funny - the same here. The difference is that most of the music I listened to when I was a teenager was from the 60s, 70s and 80s. I still don't like most 'chart' music and I still listen to a lot of older music and admire it but like yourself, I've never discounted the 'new' and tried to downplay its quality.

What I think we must remember is that time is a natural filter of detritus. There's always a lot of total and utter dross out there but over time we forget about the nonsense and remember the good stuff. This process hasn't happened for music in the last ten years or so, yet. Give it another 20 years and we'll be talking about how good music was in 2020 and how it's all rubbish now in 2040...
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
Looking back, I think 1969 was THE absolute best year in rock music, and continued through the 70s.

You mentioned CCR: Three phenomenal albums in that one year of 1969!
Moody Blues: Two phenomenal albums in that year too!

Plus all the other great rock bands were making fantastic music then.
King Crimson's first album. It's one of the few of that era that is still genuinely astonishing. It came out nowhere and nothing sounds like it, even now. Apart from their second album...
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I find myself admiring the music of my formative years more & more, yet I enjoy most of it less as each year passes - go figure.
I can't say the same thing. My formative years musically started when I was about 12, when I bought my first album. Led Zeppelin IV. That was 1974. There was a ton of amazing stuff going on musically back then. So much so that I can't possibly be listening to all of it all that often given the daily demands of family and parenthood of a teen. So, when I do get the chance to put some music on, it can sometimes amount to a reawakening and a realization in my head that says "You know? This stuff is pretty amazing." I especially enjoy doing this in the mancave where I can crank it up and sit in the ideal position between the speakers. And with my renewed interest in the drums at 57, I'm focused on music in a different way than if I was just listening for listening sake. I feel fortunate for this as other aspects of my life seem to be deteriorating.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
My formative years musically started when I was about 12, when I bought my first album.
Similar start point - my first album purchase was Focus II age 11 (1971). I already had an appetite for prog (so long as it had a groove), & along with ELP Pictures at an Exhibition, my foundation interest was born, but I always had a wide range of genre interest, including British 70's classic rock, American easy rock such as The Eagles, Boston, Chicago, Doobie brothers, but also slightly more off the radar stuff like early Tubes, BeBop Deluxe, etc. Through the 70's, I also soaked up a lot of funk stuff, as well as the occasional pop act. To contrast, my two favourite concerts of the 70's - 1980 were Slade at the Moutford Hall, & Sad Cafe at the Liverpool Empire. All this whilst training on classical timpani, then moving to kit in 1977.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
theres a lot of good music out of every decade, including this one. you just have to look OUTSIDE THE MAINSTREAM to find it. the 70s had some good music, and some shit music, so did the 60s, 80s, 90s, 00s, etc. plus it also depends on who you're asking and what their tastes are.


like if you ask a pop music fan what they think of the death metal band nile, you'll probably get a "who?? are they screamo??" response, same if you ask a metal music fan about the K-pop band BTS, you'd more than likely get a "theyre shit" response from a good few of them.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I think those people need to be issued tickets for indecent exposure. I wonder how many pants saggers realize that saggy pants is prison nomenclature for "available for sex"?
I would imagine some of them actually do, but most are just "wanna be's" who don't know that the "real world" is like....yet
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
That cartoon is only true for people who are only interested in music from the 70’s..

People within the musical environments where i like to hang out could not disagree more, myself included..

The 70’s are by far my less favorite decade regarding basically everything..

And musically, the only really nice things that happened were some nice funk, punk, new wave (late 70’s) and Steely Dan..

I am sure I forget a few nice things now, like Rickie Lee Jones and some Joni Mitchell records..

Maybe the 70’s were not that bad after all, if all the typical classic rock (Boston, Cheap Trick, etc), disco and Queen can just be ignored and left out..lol..
would you please suggest a better decade???
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
would you please suggest a better decade???
after thinking about it, for me, it crosses 2 decades: 1975-85...so does that count?

All of my most favorite musical styles started in that 10 year era: Prog-rock; proto metal; funk; NWOBHM; DC Hardcore; Anarcho/crust punk; early power metal; thrash; proto and early rap; new wave; DCI Drum and Bugle corps; prog metal; noise and proto industrial; black metal;

the first "Death of Music" for me was the early 90's with Grunge and "Alternative"...gangsta rap killed hip/hop for me, and boy bands were just dismal. Hair metal and that crap killed metal for me...pop punk started- blech...Metallica sold out...so this era sent me further underground to find good music, and sent me quickly out to my lawn to yell at the kids to get off of it :cool: 👊

that venture underground saved me though...as it had in the 80's, the stuff that was not getting mainstream attention was the best...and I also think that I was "growing up" and widening my tastes...
 

makinao

Silver Member
Ask a jazz purist about the 70s and he/she will most probably say it was a disaster because Miles sold out and fusion ruined music :)
 
Bell bottoms don't even begin to compete with pants sagging below a guy's ass exposing most of his underwear, or worse. I can't tell you now many times I've been tempted to tell someone "Why don't you pull your fxxxxxg pants up. No one wants to look at your dirty stained underwear."
+1.

And don’t even get me started on all the hipster “MEN???” with their skinny jeans 🙄😂.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
+1.

And don’t even get me started on all the hipster “MEN???” with their skinny jeans 🙄😂.
I'm skinny, so all my pants that aren't baggy look like skinny jeans. What's even worse is they are all starting to incorporate stretchy fabric so they look even more skinny. It's awful.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
+1.

And don’t even get me started on all the hipster “MEN???” with their skinny jeans 🙄😂.
I won't diss the skinny jean thing because there really isn't anything offensive about them. Definitely not my style, even if I could pull off wearing them, which I can't. I much prefer the old classic Levi's jeans of my youth. Sadly, even Levi's doesn't seem to be making their jeans like they used to. I have found that Gap makes jeans that are like my old Levi's. And their Straight cut is the one I prefer the most. My wife bought me three pairs. Straight, Athletic and Relaxed. The Relaxed make me look like an old man with a saggy ass. The Athletic are just too skinny for me. Just give me a classic cut pair of jeans and I'm a happy camper.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I won't diss the skinny jean thing because there really isn't anything offensive about them. Definitely not my style, even if I could pull off wearing them, which I can't. I much prefer the old classic Levi's jeans of my youth. Sadly, even Levi's doesn't seem to be making their jeans like they used to. I have found that Gap makes jeans that are like my old Levi's. And their Straight cut is the one I prefer the most. My wife bought me three pairs. Straight, Athletic and Relaxed. The Relaxed make me look like an old man with a saggy ass. The Athletic are just too skinny for me. Just give me a classic cut pair of jeans and I'm a happy camper.
I just skip jeans in general and wear camo shorts year round...I only own 1 pair of jeans, and those are for "casual dress" days at school...b/c I can't wear shorts.

But some of the pants my mom had me in in the 70's....ugh. Good thing that I was only a little kid and didn't really care about how I looked. There was a lot of "plaid disasters" <- which is a great name for a band...trademark already filed for!!
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I just skip jeans in general and wear camo shorts year round...I only own 1 pair of jeans, and those are for "casual dress" days at school...b/c I can't wear shorts.

But some of the pants my mom had me in in the 70's....ugh. Good thing that I was only a little kid and didn't really care about how I looked. There was a lot of "plaid disasters" <- which is a great name for a band...trademark already filed for!!
Living in the US Northeast, cargo shorts, or any shorts for that matter, year round is not an option unless you want to freeze your nuts off.
 
Top