Promark Changes

Was just cruising the ProMark drumsticks website and noticed they have streamlined the site, as well as, their lineup. Their lineup is now split into a Classic line of forward balanced sticks, and, rear balanced sticks. Gone seems to be the Select Balance designation per se, along with, a number of long time signature models like the Paul Wertico 808, the Carl Palmer model, the 737, and others which I've probably missed. Even the 808 Japanese Oaks are no longer in the lineup. Fortunately, the website now seems easier to navigate. There seems to be a lot of change across other brands as well.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The stick market is flooded with options, and manufacturers can only sell so much. Consolidating production must be Promark's way of cutting costs and protecting profits. I can't blame a business for pursuing those measures.

I worked at Promark's factory in high school, back when it was a family business run by Herb Brochstein, a great drummer and an admirable guy. He was on site every day, intimately involved in the hub of things. The company has changed a great deal since then, as have its product lines. I use only AHEAD sticks now, but if I played wood, Promark would probably be my brand again, mostly because of fond memories.
 
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The stick market is flooded with options, and manufacturers can only sell so much. Consolidating production must be Promark's way of cutting costs and protecting profits. I can't blame a business for pursuing those measures.

I worked at Promark's factory in high school, back when it was a family business run by Herb Brochstein, a great drummer and an admirable guy. He was on site every day, intimately involved in the hub of things. The company has changed a great deal since then, as has its product lines. I use only AHEAD sticks now, but if I played wood, Promark would probably be my brand again, mostly because of fond memories.
For sure, there are so many, maybe too many, options in sticks these days. It's certainly understandable that companies would be careful to watch what sells, and what doesn't. It's a shame to see the classic legacy designs disappear through. Although you can make the argument that even those hadchanged since the days you worked at Pro-Mark back in the Brochstien family days. That must have been quite the experience for a high school kid!
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
That must have been quite the experience for a high school kid!
I had a connection who got me in. My instructor at the time, a pro session drummer, was involved in sales and marketing with Promark. Mr. Brochstein had decided to launch a limited-edition series of snare drums and wanted them tuned up and ready to play right out of the box. My instructor recommended me as a tuner, and I received an offer to work at Promark's factory for the summer. Two other guys and I tuned snare drums all day long. Brochstein would pop in intermittently to check our progress. In one memorable instance, he picked up a pair of sticks and "tested" one of the snares, executing an utterly complex pattern with tremendous dynamic facility. He didn't hesitate to criticize our work as needed, but he was always respectful and constructive about it. I learned a whole lot about tuning snares that summer.

He also gave us money for lunch almost daily, right out of his own wallet. Just a really great guy.
 
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That's a great story for sure. Were they the 50th Anniversary snare drums? There's a listing on Reverb.com. See link below:
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
That's a great story for sure. Were they the 50th Anniversary snare drums? There's a listing on Reverb.com. See link below:

Those were well after my time. I worked at Promark in 1988, around its thirtieth anniversary. If I remember correctly, the line of snares I tuned were the first ones Promark ever released. Interestingly, I never got one. I was a Pearl guy back then too. :)
 
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CommanderRoss

Silver Member
In one memorable instance, he picked up a pair of sticks and "tested" one of the snares, executing an utterly complex pattern with tremendous dynamic facility. He didn't hesitate to criticize our work as needed, but he was always respectful and constructive about it. I learned a whole lot about tuning snares that summer.

He also gave us money for lunch daily, right out of his own wallet. Just a really great guy.

What an awesome experience and memory!
I'm sure the "criticizing" was more instruction than correction. I can only imagine how good your snares sound thanks to love like that. ;)
 

Jml

Senior Member
I like the new website. Easier to navigate and find stuff. What I don’t like is that they’re pushing the activegrip and firegrain drumsticks, and eliminating certain models. Like the 5a rebound select .550 size model, for one.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Those were well after my time. I worked at Promark in 1988, around its thirtieth anniversary. If I remember correctly, the line of snares I tuned were the first ones Promark ever released. Interestingly, I never got one. I was a Pearl guy back then too. :)
You like your Pearls brother..i love that.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I remember thinking I was developing carpel tunnel at one point having to grip a 5A to tightly to hang on to it. I went to a 5B Vater which very much helped. I also remember how comfortable a promark 3S felt in my hands which surprised me for such a hefty stick. That particular stick let my hands relax more while (it) did the work. What a great stick..no other 3S compared.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I remember thinking I was developing carpel tunnel at one point having to grip a 5A to tightly to hang on to it. I went to a 5B Vater which very much helped. I also remember how comfortable a promark 3S felt in my hands which surprised me for such a hefty stick. That particular stick let my hands relax more while (it) did the work. What a great stick..no other 3S compared.

Your experience isn't at all unusual. Many players find larger sticks easier to grip loosely. A loose grip is essential to avoiding injury.
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I like that they are slowing phasing the teardrop shape out. Or at least delegating it to different line of sticks.

I felt like the teardrop tip shape at wasn’t really working (for me at least) and asked them if they could make their natural 5A with an acorn tip. They told me no at the time (understandable cause who tf am I lol), but i guess the answer was actually yes!

I’m really looking forward to trying out their revamped models.

The thicker diameter and tip shape might make it easier for Vic Firth lovers to try a couple Promark models out 🤷🏾‍♀️
 

Justinhub2003

Well-known member
If you can find it in stock, you should absolutely check out the Carter McLean Signature stick..I've been playing with them the last few weeks and Im all in. The Benny Greb Signature was my go to but the wild in consistency in weight and quality of those sticks left a lot to be desired. The CM stick is really versatile and offers a unique tip shape.
 

BertTheDrummer

Gold Member
The stick market is flooded with options, and manufacturers can only sell so much. Consolidating production must be Promark's way of cutting costs and protecting profits. I can't blame a business for pursuing those measures.
D'Addario (ProMark's parent company) is big on the Toyota style manufacturing practices, basically streamlining whenever and wherever possible. Two of the things is to eliminate overproduction and unnecessary inventory. So, I'm not surprised they are doing that especially in the face of all of the effects COVID has put on companies.
 
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