practicing on an electric drumset...

tolgapala

Senior Member
Just be careful to choose one that is best suited to your needs - Tolgalpala paints a rosy picture, but the fact is they do present noise problems, especially to those living below you in an apartment, or those in next door rooms, and if you only play on an ekit, you soon get out of shape on the acoustic. Any drum teacher will tell you the same. Stick response is a bitch.

i am not suggesting they do not present any sort of noise but compared to an acoustic set (an the impossibility of using them to practice at night even if you have a sound isolated/insulated room) they are almost noiseless. there is for sure a great deal of tapping sound as if working on a practice pad. kick pad naturally makes the most noise of all. for the ones living below, some conventional measures would work fine such as a folded and thick carpet (or foam plates under that) put under the set. it is basically not a difficulty that you couldn't overcome.

i have to agree with you; about stick response being a bitch but yet again i am not suggesting to work with it all the time. acoustic sets are the real deal that is for sure. this could only present an alternative.it is not much different than practicing rudiments on a practice pad for hours. (for sure much more fun.) then you adjust yourself when you get behind an acoustic set. and i sincerely think that you do not get out of shape soon. not to start another discussion i do not agree with that. it's simply depending on the way of usage and understanding of e drums.
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
i am not suggesting they do not present any sort of noise but compared to an acoustic set (an the impossibility of using them to practice at night even if you have a sound isolated/insulated room) they are almost noiseless. there is for sure a great deal of tapping sound as if working on a practice pad. kick pad naturally makes the most noise of all. for the ones living below, some conventional measures would work fine such as a folded and thick carpet (or foam plates under that) put under the set. it is basically not a difficulty that you couldn't overcome.

i have to agree with you; about stick response being a bitch but yet again i am not suggesting to work with it all the time. acoustic sets are the real deal that is for sure. this could only present an alternative.it is not much different than practicing rudiments on a practice pad for hours. (for sure much more fun.) then you adjust yourself when you get behind an acoustic set. and i sincerely think that you do not get out of shape soon. not to start another discussion i do not agree with that. it's simply depending on the way of usage and understanding of e drums.


This is why i suggest choosing wqhich ekit to buy carefully. For feel and quality the Rolands win, but have the problem of featuring rims, which allow for great realism but are much more noisy when struck. Similarly, the cheaper Rolands have cymbal pads that feature 'realistic feeling' plastic surface, which are very loud and sound awful. These hazards are more relevant to those living in apartments; if possible set the kit up on a ground floor or cellar where there's nobody below you.
 

Drummer Karl

KARL MEMBER
the thing i hate the most about drumming is the fact that I cant practice at night because of my neighbors.

I was thinking of spending some money on a nice electric drumset, I played on them and they sound good enough for me, and itll be cool to be able to jam with people with it because of the option to play at much lower volumes.

I was wondering however, would practicing on an electric drumset hold me back? do you think it may make me worst at playing on a regular set? could it be possible that I develop bad habits on the electric?

Well...yes and no.
getting an e-kit for night practice and general practice at lower volumes may be a good idea. Obviously it`s practicing which improves certain things and which helps to reach goals. It`s great to play along with tunes, it`s great to experiment with different sounds and it`s an whole other experience for sure. Recording yourself is simple, this is helpful if you wanna analyze your playing.

Though there is one thing which really holds me back from getting an e-kit (except the financial problem): The synthetic feel. When I played on some Roland and Yamaha e-kits for a while I were able to notice that it wasn`t hard to get the best possible sound out of the drum. It`s no challenge, after a while you probably don`t listen to yourself carefully enough because every hit sounds great.
Your inner tension might get loose. So in conclusion it can`t improve your ear for sound really. The reason for this is the (partly) unsensitive feel and the synthetic sound.

Karl
 

tolgapala

Senior Member
It`s no challenge, after a while you probably don`t listen to yourself carefully enough because every hit sounds great.
Your inner tension might get loose. So in conclusion it can`t improve your ear for sound really. The reason for this is the (partly) unsensitive feel and the synthetic sound.

Karl

i have to agree on that on certain aspects. there is obviously an inevitable synthetic feel simply because the fact that you are not actually physically/acoustically generating the sound with your hits so the dynamics are limited to the electronics' capabilities. but on the contrary, not everything you hit sounds that great if you are not in control of your playing. especially if you are using a plug-in like dfh, there is a great deal of dynamics involved and the set responds to it very well. expensive models like the roland td20 or the yammie dtxIVs do have many of those quality samples and sample processing come on board. but with cheaper models like the one i have(with help with a little software twist) i can still have the sense of accents, ghost notes, rim shots etc.

although i do agree there is a whole lot more to consider when playing with an acoustic set. if you are not in control of your playing you can't sound well. i mean i do realize the fact that you can easily hit the snare intending for a rim shot but if you fail to complete the hit properly (hitting the head and the rim at the same time), instead of having the rim shot you sound like a big click. i used to hate when it happened when i first started playing. it sure happens still every once in a while. :) in that sense i do agree. but a drummer with that in mind that this is something totally different would not have a set back from his/her overall performance as far as i am concerned. i do understand the reasons why many drummers are cautiously approaching edrums but all i am saying is to cut them some slack. :) (i am not getting money from any edrum manufacturers by the way, lol)

with all the advancements and new technology involved, it surely gives the drummer a taste to the real thing. i do think every drummer (that can afford to have one) needs to own one to experience the transition in fun and functionality, sound and dynamics.

cheers!
 
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