Post Your Greatest Weakness ?

How many of you drummers play double bass ?


  • Total voters
    24

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Bebop jazz ride pattern
- this is a skill solved with practice time
- I know what I need to do to pick up this skill - the mystery is gone, plus the fact I don't hang around enough musicians that can play this style
- I'm always about 3 months away from this goal realization (ie I'll work on this tomorrow)

Blues snare shuffle
- this is a skill solved with practice time
- I know what I need to do to pick up this skill - the mystery is gone
- playing this style too linearly is cheating in my book
- there are plenty of musicians around that play the style = $ reward
- the style looks boring
- I'm always about 3 months away from this goal realization (ie I'll work on this tomorrow)

Make noise song endings
- this is the ability to string together several drum licks back to back while being ready to terminate with an instant double crash to sync with the singer and band
- it's boring as it requires little limb independence, just sequential construction
- not having (or believing in) double-kick exacerbates the problem
- I don't have a lot of drum licks in my arsenal but the following patterns put together in random order seems to do well:
RLRKKRLKK
RLKRLKRLKRLK

Stick twirling
- not in my DNA
- probably why I don't play heavy metal or rock
 
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felonious69

Well-known member
First of all I haven't even touched a drum set in about 30 years.
Second...I never was a drummer
Third...Her: "Why does that have to be so @^#&$*ing LOUD!?"
Fourth...First kit I ever owned

But it's gonna be fun!
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
My greatest weakness is that I can hear all those great fills that Vinnie, Terry, Chester, Phil, Steve (Smith), Ndugu, Narada, ah, what's the use, the list is too long. I can hear what they are doing but when I sit at the drums and try to do what they are doing my body says to me "What?! Are you crazy?! I'm not doing that!!"
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
My greatest weakness is that I can hear all those great fills that Vinnie, Terry, Chester, Phil, Steve (Smith), Ndugu, Narada, ah, what's the use, the list is too long. I can hear what they are doing but when I sit at the drums and try to do what they are doing my body says to me "What?! Are you crazy?! I'm not doing that!!"
as with many other activities I do (hockey; mountain/BMX biking) I just ignore my body....
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
as with many other activities I do (hockey; mountain/BMX biking) I just ignore my body....
I used to do the same thing, expecially with mountain biking. Unfortunately the last time I did that I ended up going over the handlebars and both my legs his either the bike or some rocks. They both swelled up and I was a mess for months. My body told me otherwise. This was a couple years ago and I haven't been on single track since. I've been road biking to try to get into shape so one day I can get back on the mountain bike and hit the trails near me again.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I used to do the same thing, expecially with mountain biking. Unfortunately the last time I did that I ended up going over the handlebars and both my legs his either the bike or some rocks. They both swelled up and I was a mess for months. My body told me otherwise. This was a couple years ago and I haven't been on single track since. I've been road biking to try to get into shape so one day I can get back on the mountain bike and hit the trails near me again.
yep...I bruised some ribs crashing into a tree a few years ago. Now, when I round that corner, I ALWAYS slow down, and that damned tree is still smirking at me. I had to sit out about 2 months for that.
 

petrez

Senior Member
I feel that my greatest weakness is making up creative fills on the fly. Both live and in the studio. After some years after that first "discovery", I feel it's gotten a bit better, but I still feel it's the one thing that I dislike about my own drumming. Second thing would be intricate double bass patterns, like going from high speed to half speed, then up again without any stops, or mixing between triplets/16th notes etc.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I feel that my greatest weakness is making up creative fills on the fly. Both live and in the studio. After some years after that first "discovery", I feel it's gotten a bit better, but I still feel it's the one thing that I dislike about my own drumming. Second thing would be intricate double bass patterns, like going from high speed to half speed, then up again without any stops, or mixing between triplets/16th notes etc.
RE the bass drum patterns: have you ever tried hand exercises with your feet? Like anything that would have gotten your hands to understand those concepts, do with your feet. I have always used the exercises I do for marching band hand development with my feet too. I also run the rudiments with my feet, polyrhythmic exercises...
 

jimb

Member
Fast single foot double BD beats...dada dada, Ive studied the two techniques for years but it all feels like such hard work...ah well..
 

jimb

Member
I learned those just playing along to Queensryche back in the 80's...Rockenfield used them a lot
I so wish.
And just thgt of another failure. Fast triplets around the kit....snare, FT BD..repeated.....I think my co-ordination threshold has been reached...guess there has to be a limit.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I so wish.
And just thgt of another failure. Fast triplets around the kit....snare, FT BD..repeated.....I think my co-ordination threshold has been reached...guess there has to be a limit.
well...not really. The key is to start slow, and then let your muscles build up as you rep....

for the bass drum thing, what helps me is that:
1. I use heel up technique
2. because of #1, I leave the beater on the head when I play a stroke, which allows me to "push off" the pedal, and then catch it as it releases and push the beater back in for the second stroke. The song "Walk In The Shadows" by Queensryche is a perfect tempo to do this slow...
3. I also would use the typical doubles exercise for hands from from drum corps - the one that goes: 1e a2 and uh ee and 4 and" (think of the famous fill in "In The Air Tonight"). I would do that slowly - like 80 beats on a met - and then slowly speed up.
4. lastly, making sure that I am sitting straight up on my core helps my legs "float" under the weight of my upper body...and having my upper leg parallel to the ground (meaning that the stool height is correct) also helps my legs float. I used to play with my knees slightly higher than my waist (due to a broken stool), and once I made my upper legs parallel, it changed everything

with the triplets around the drums:
1. again, start slow with a met...probably at 90bpm, and think of each beat as starting a new triplet.
2. for me, I use the sticking RLR LRL RLR LRL - alternated strokes- and that allows me to move from each drum (snare, tom 1, tom 2 ,floor tom) evenly because the alternated strokes move me through the drums evenly ( I play right handed).
3. slowly start moving around the drums using this sticking...increase your speed slowly until you feel tension. That is your "trouble tempo". Once you find that, make a note of it, and then back down 5-10 beats and stay at that tempo for a while. The more you do this, the more your muscles will "stretch out" and relaxation will follow

Hopefully this helps...if not, just tell me to p**s off ;)
 
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