Possible new drummer - ekit vs acoustic/mesh heads/LV cymbals vs acoustic/cymbals/mutes

brentcn

Platinum Member
From the standpoint of day one, trying to work hands and feet at the same time, I would agree that it isn’t useful. If day one, someone was practicing one foot at a time to build up the leg and core muscles to properly build toward playing heel-up both feet at the same time with proper posture, I think practicing slow basic beats is very useful. It can take months to work the feet out, independent of hands. So, starting early makes sense to me.
Agreed. I actually use some exercises that are geared specifically toward coordinating both hands and foot (feet), that start at a simpler, more manageable place than learning paradiddles while playing quarters. Like, singles at various note rates, alternating between one hand and one foot, and so on. It works well.

Although the paradiddle sticking pattern (RLRRLRLL) is easy to learn, the technique is pretty complex, because each hand needs to execute a downstroke, two taps, and an upstroke. This combination requires considerable control over the wrists, fingers, and fulcrum. I usually have the student practicing each hand by itself, and then also removing some notes as a "builder" exercise, to really shine a light on the stick movements, and to build muscle memory. I wouldn't expect that student to do all of this work while also playing quarters on the bass drum. That can come a bit later.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
Agreed. I actually use some exercises that are geared specifically toward coordinating both hands and foot (feet), that start at a simpler, more manageable place than learning paradiddles while playing quarters. Like, singles at various note rates, alternating between one hand and one foot, and so on. It works well.

Although the paradiddle sticking pattern (RLRRLRLL) is easy to learn, the technique is pretty complex, because each hand needs to execute a downstroke, two taps, and an upstroke. This combination requires considerable control over the wrists, fingers, and fulcrum. I usually have the student practicing each hand by itself, and then also removing some notes as a "builder" exercise, to really shine a light on the stick movements, and to build muscle memory. I wouldn't expect that student to do all of this work while also playing quarters on the bass drum. That can come a bit later.
Yup, in my world you’d get your singles and doubles in shape before you so much as glance at a paradiddle... :unsure:
 

iCe

Senior Member
Having played and owning an e-kit and kit fitted with silent mesh heads and silent cymbals, i prefer the latter over any e-kit.
Downside is you can't recorded anything. Well you can, but it hasn't got the sound obviously of a real kit. But the feel of mesh heads and the response of silent cymbals (like Zildjian L80) are IMO unsurpassed compared to electric cymbals. No e-hihat can match the nuances you get from a silent hi-hat.
The Remo Silent Stroke heads are great too. Nice feel you get out of them!
To further reduce noise i put some old heads on the reso side and cut a big circle out of them. That way you lose the resonance and fuller tom sound, but sound is not what you're after with this solution. I do keep the snare reso head an wires on the snare. It's a tad louder than the rest, but can be solved with using an O-ring on top. That way you still have that essential snare sound and also hear all the nuances.
 
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Noisy

Well-known member
Agreed. I actually use some exercises that are geared specifically toward coordinating both hands and foot (feet), that start at a simpler, more manageable place than learning paradiddles while playing quarters. Like, singles at various note rates, alternating between one hand and one foot, and so on. It works well.

Although the paradiddle sticking pattern (RLRRLRLL) is easy to learn, the technique is pretty complex, because each hand needs to execute a downstroke, two taps, and an upstroke. This combination requires considerable control over the wrists, fingers, and fulcrum. I usually have the student practicing each hand by itself, and then also removing some notes as a "builder" exercise, to really shine a light on the stick movements, and to build muscle memory. I wouldn't expect that student to do all of this work while also playing quarters on the bass drum. That can come a bit later.
Personally, I think I wasted a lot of time on feet because I used body weight shifting to compensate for lack of strength in other muscles. I think it makes sense to work the proper muscles from the start.

So, as an example, IF someone wanted to use ankle technique and wanted the calf muscles to be the major driver of the pedal, I would personally prefer practicing with just thinking about using the calf muscle, relaxing other muscles ( which are of course still active and are part of the balancing and support system), having correct posture and balance, not learning to one side or leaning backwards, etc. As soon as it can be done while balanced, both heels should be up while the calf is activated.

I wouldn’t initially encourage playing with other drums. I think coordinating beats makes someone want to have a “sound” goal. To make the sound it is easiest to cheat somewhere. In the beginning, IMO, it is better to work on operating the key muscles while maintaining balance. It isn’t easy and takes time. But, it could help reduce bad technique and encourage playing correctly sooner. With just a bass pedal and high hat stand, without a drum or cymbals, if the proper muscle technique is used, the muscles can start to be activated. Unused muscles need time to get going.

Just my opinion, after using bad/sloppy techniques.

Other opinions welcome!
 
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