Positive effects of negative feedback

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Seemed like the right thing to do

Nothing motivates a person more than when they are called out for something (assuming a reliable source)
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I was told once that I couldn't be heard. I now hit the drums like nobody's business.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
True, without criticism we would not improve. Nobody is perfect and everyone has to improve, and that will happen quicker (albeit a bit more painful) when someone calls out their shortcomings. I have learned a lot from mine and I have to thank those people who called me out even if some of them were real tools
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I know personally if someone tells me I cant do something, it lights a huge fire under me so I can prove them wrong. Positive comments feel good, negative comments feel like a challenge.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
IDK, I wouldn't file anything I do in teaching as "negative criticism", or any kind of criticism. It's more a question of "here's what needs work, so let's do that." There's nothing negative or positive about it. Or it's mainly positive, because, hooray, we're going to get better at something.

If someone needs negative comments to be motivated to play the drums, that's their problem-- I don't support that in my students.
 

moodman

Well-known member
' the truth hurts' 'the truth will set you free' 'the truth will out'
While I believe criticism should be the realm of instructors, sometimes some observer, well-intentioned or not, may be our source of enlightenment. What one does with that depends on the individual. Such comments helped me get my dynamics righteous.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I respond well to a negative, from band members or another drummer.
But I agree in teaching (in any topic) it has to be couched with a positive suggestion or solution.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I've witnessed "negative feedback" play out in a lot of different ways. Those who like challenges might find it invigorating, using it as fuel to improve their performance and perhaps even to gain respect in the eyes of the critic, but not everyone enjoys being challenged. Some want unending praise, even if it's void of substance, while others just wish to be left alone. Everyone responds to stimuli uniquely. It isn't sufficient to say, "Be constructive in your criticism, and all will go well." Constructive means different things to different people. What you find polite and productive, someone else might deem insolent and irrelevant. The right words to the wrong person can spell big trouble. Communicating effectively means knowing your audience.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Negative feedback is best ingested on a poop sandwich. Give ‘em positive feedback, then deliver the punch of bad, then a gentle goodbye with a positive blessing. Works very well, as long as one is truthful.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Negative feedback is best ingested on a poop sandwich. Give ‘em positive feedback, then deliver the punch of bad, then a gentle goodbye with a positive blessing. Works very well, as long as one is truthful.

Research supports your recommendation to an extent. Studies find that the order of negative vs. positive information has a substantial impact not only on how a discussion is processed but also on the impression it leaves on participants. To summarize, commencing with niceties, placing negative data in the middle of the dialogue, and ending with something positive is the recommended sequence. Apparently, what you hear last is what you dwell upon most, provided that you trust the source of criticism.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
I tend to find positive feedback almost useless based on the source...and negative feedback just as unreliable if not ego driven.

This is why we hire coaches...to get reliable and usable feedback.
 
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