Port Hole Patching?

EarthRocker

Senior Member
I recently bought a drum head from a buddy of mine. It was used a few times, but barely. The only flaw I have with the head is the port hole. I don't care for them. What's the best thing I could use to patch it without a lot of extra muffle? I was thinking getting one of those $1.88 duct tape squares and trimming it down a bit so there isn't as much extra coverage on the drum head.
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
Did you know you disliked portholes before or after the purchase?

I would just buy a different reso head that isn't ported.
 

EarthRocker

Senior Member
Did you know you disliked portholes before or after the purchase?

I would just buy a different reso head that isn't ported.
I did. But the drum head I purchased was a good deal of just $10.00 for a head that was barely touched, and I do not have the cash to go purchase a non-ported head right now. June 18th my band will playing a small gig, and this "patch" will be a temoporary solution until I can buy another head.
 

StickIt

Senior Member
I hope that someone has a good remedy for you, but if it were me, I would leave it alone.

I would think that anything that you attach to the reso head will dampen your sound...
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I suppose you could try and find some mylar, though I'm not sure what the best way to attach it is. No matter what, if you add stuff to the head, it's going to dampen a bit.
 

AZStickman

Senior Member
I suppose you could try and find some mylar, though I'm not sure what the best way to attach it is. No matter what, if you add stuff to the head, it's going to dampen a bit.
3M makes a spray adhesive that would work to attach Mylar. You can find it at the Big box stores..... Terry
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
3M makes a spray adhesive that would work to attach Mylar. You can find it at the Big box stores..... Terry
That might work well, because as a spray it would minimize the actual glue substance on your drum head, and also be pretty even.
 

EarthRocker

Senior Member
3M makes a spray adhesive that would work to attach Mylar. You can find it at the Big box stores..... Terry
I may try that. I've come to terms that anything I use will dampen the sound. But slight dampening is nothing compared to the tone I lose from the port hole.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I may try that. I've come to terms that anything I use will dampen the sound. But slight dampening is nothing compared to the tone I lose from the port hole.
I think it's still going to be damped quite a bit. The actual structure of the head has been compromised and adding more material is probably not going to change much except maybe the feel of the head... Maybe I'm wrong, though. Give er a shot. Only 10 bucks wasted if no good.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Take an old head, cut it 1 inch bigger diameter than the hole and glue it on from the inside.
 

lsits

Gold Member
My opinion would be to do the gig with the ported head. I don't think anyone else would notice the difference. The audience and your bandmates would probably notice the patched reso head more than the sound. There will probably be times when you will need a ported head and It'll be good to have one that you can pull out.
 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
Just get an old piece of cardboard, like the old kind found under a leaky car, and duct tape it over the hole.

Make sure you use plenty of duct tape. You can NEVER use enough duct tape.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
So am I getting this right? You won't use it as it is without spending more money to mod it? But it was cheap so you bought it anyway, even though you don't really like it and it doesn't suit your purposes?

Man, you sound like my wife. What's your shoe closet look like? :)
 

evilg99

Platinum Member
You should get a big roll of gaffer tape and tape that f'&%'er up. Ugly as possible. Getto.

Seriously...consult your local Craigslist and find a used bass drum head, people list them all the time...cheap.

Neal
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Take an old head, cut it 1 inch bigger diameter than the hole and glue it on from the inside.
If I was between a rock and a hard place, this is what I would do. Just make sure the edges of the patch are securely fastened down. Then save up and get a new reso head.

Dennis
 

EarthRocker

Senior Member
So am I getting this right? You won't use it as it is without spending more money to mod it? But it was cheap so you bought it anyway, even though you don't really like it and it doesn't suit your purposes?

Man, you sound like my wife. What's your shoe closet look like? :)
Spending 10 dollars for the head, and then five extra bucks for a cheap patch to last me a month or so is a lot different than the $40.00 bucks for an immediate replacement.
I've been unemployed for the last short while - so until I get a new new job, we've been living by my wife's income alone.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Sounds like you are in a catch 22. If you do anything to patch the hole, it will effect the sound and you won't be completely happy. If you don't patch the hole, it effects your sound and you won't be completely happy. Personally I think you should just leave it alone, Less effort, less money. I doubt regular glue will hold once you tune up the head, super glue may possibly ruin the head as it will melt some plastics, and the aerosol in spray glue may do the same thing. A month or so will pass before you even know it.
 

EarthRocker

Senior Member
Problem solved. I went with my original idea of the duct tape square. I removed the cloth strip across the shell to compensate for the muffling. It's not perfect, but I'll be content until I can get a new reso. head.

Thanks for all the help guys.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I think it's still going to be damped quite a bit. The actual structure of the head has been compromised and adding more material is probably not going to change much except maybe the feel of the head... Maybe I'm wrong, though. Give er a shot. Only 10 bucks wasted if no good.
Lots of dampening is a good thing to most people. Many drummers buy the thinnest, ringiest heads they can find and then go to extremes of stuffing clothing, pillows, blankets, towels and other junk in a desperate effort to dampen the head. I actually thickened my drum head by gluing a layer of felt to the inside reso head. The drum loses no internal volume, rings are tamed and drum has plenty of chomp.

I'd recommend getting a piece of mylar drum head, cutting it a little bigger than the hole, and carefully gluing it. The only drawback is, this isn't going to help you much with controlling ring.
 
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