Please Don't Do This

P

plangentmusic

Guest
Pet peeve time.

When a song ends with a tight ending, why do drummers let the cymbals continue to ring?!?!?!

That drives me absolutely nuts. I want to walk over to the set and choke the cymbals -- and then choke the drummer. It just strikes me as so unmusical. And the fact that many other band members don't realize it is equally frustrating.

Okay -- just wanted to get that off my chest. I'm better now.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I totally agree too, it's an integral part of the song.

I'm annoyed the other way round too, when the bass player end the song with "ddooooooooooooooooooommmmmmmmm" and the singer start to talk before the sound fade away :(
 

larryz

Platinum Member
That doesn't bother me as much as a drummer wearing shorts at a live gig. Neil Peart, Phil Ehart, loads of other drummers, professionals, wearing $10 (at most) shorts. Doesn't matter if your band is local, national, international. Dress up a little! Jeez. And don't get me started on shirtless drummers either... :)
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
I try not to impose my own personal tastes on others' musical creativity.
That's another way of saying that everybody can do whatever they want. Nice idea. But it the real world it just causes chaos. If I'm conducting a Mozart piece and the third violinist decides it would be creative to start playing "Sweet Caroline" I think there's going to be a problem.
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
I don't see a problem with it.

Cymbals ring. It's part of their beauty.

I respect that. But I wouldn't hire you. I'm not saying that to be a dick -- I'm saying it so that it might help. Dozens of other people might feel the same way and not say it.

All notes ring. And there's a time when they should stop ringing.




.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Depends on the song. In general, I agree that a tight cutoff is good, but there are times where a little decay adds something nice... organic... natural sounding. I don't mean a 20" crash that roars for 30 seconds, but a more modest crash with a shorter, sweeter, more controlled decay.

Sometimes I split the difference, and rather than a hard choke or letting the crash ring, I'll let the cymbal ring for about 2 seconds, then gradually mute it over the next second or two, like a quick fade.

Again, it depends on the song, it's not a rule that can be followed one way or the other and always be correct.

Bermuda
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
Depends on the song. In general, I agree that a tight cutoff is good, but there are times where a little decay adds something nice... organic... natural sounding. I don't mean a 20" crash that roars for 30 seconds, but a more modest crash with a shorter, sweeter, more controlled decay.

Sometimes I split the difference, and rather than a hard choke or letting the crash ring, I'll let the cymbal ring for about 2 seconds, then gradually mute it over the next second or two, like a quick fade.

Again, it depends on the song, it's not a rule that can be followed one way or the other and always be correct.

Bermuda
Of course. The point is, the cymbals need to sustain along with the other sounds -- not independent of them.
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
Maybe you should give some examples of what exactly your talking about.


Not sure how I can do that. Image this -- pick a song with a tight ending. YYZ for example. But instead of a staccato ending, there's an open sustained cymbal crash. That would sound sloppy and amateurish to me.
 

Xero Talent

Silver Member
That's another way of saying that everybody can do whatever they want. Nice idea. But it the real world it just causes chaos. If I'm conducting a Mozart piece and the third violinist decides it would be creative to start playing "Sweet Caroline" I think there's going to be a problem.
Some people are more tolerant of "chaos" than others. And suggesting that "chaos" follows whenever a cymbal is left to ring after a tight ending is frankly ridiculous.

Since when was it a steadfast rule that cymbals HAVE to be choked on a tight ending? One of my favorite Clutch songs has a tight ending with the cymbals ringing fading out and it sounds awesome.

Just cause one person doesn't like it, doesn't mean it's wrong. It just means one person doesn't like it, and expects everyone else to agree and accommodate their preference.
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
I’m not sure that we’re all talking about the same thing.

There’s endings that are way short that demand everybody mute everything (can’t think of an example at the moment). These endings aren’t unusual, but they tend to happen in much less than the majority of songs.

The more common ending has a full-band chord hit, typically with a crash. (Not talking about a train-wreck hold-the-chord-and-strike-a-rock-pose type ending, just everybody hitting the chord at the same time.) In this second type of ending, it’s normal for cymbals to ring after all the other instruments have stopped. It’s the physics of a cymbal combined with the reality that for a guitar to keep ringing it takes some work (holding the chord on the fretboard or whatever), but to keep a cymbal ringing takes zero work: you just ignore it.

In this second type of ending, I find it UNmusical to mute the cymbals.

Let your bronze ring out!
 
P

plangentmusic

Guest
Some people are more tolerant of "chaos" than others. And suggesting that "chaos" follows whenever a cymbal is left to ring after a tight ending is frankly ridiculous.

Since when was it a steadfast rule that cymbals HAVE to be choked on a tight ending? One of my favorite Clutch songs has a tight ending with the cymbals ringing fading out and it sounds awesome.

Just cause one person doesn't like it, doesn't mean it's wrong. It just means one person doesn't like it, and expects everyone else to agree.
Hey, there's no steadfast rules you can't play an F natural chord with an F# in the bass -- but 999 times out of a 1000 it's going to sound like crap. Just sayin.'

I'd like to hear that Clutch song you're talking about.
 
Top