Playing with logs

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I was at a local shop (not Guitar Sucker or Sam Ass) and they happened to have the sig sticks of Jay Weinberg and Thomas Lang.
One thing I noticed they had in common was the heavy weight and overall thickness of their sticks.

As a player of many styles, I have to ask: Do they use heavier sticks so they don’t have to hit as hard, or do they use them AND hit hard for volume and projection?

Thoughts?
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I am not all that familiar with either of those two but another drummer I know who played with tree trunks as sticks was Tony Williams. AND he hit harder than most drummers. And with those black dot heads no less.

 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I am not all that familiar with either of those two but another drummer I know who played with tree trunks as sticks was Tony Williams. AND he hit harder than most drummers. And with those black dot heads no less.

Unreal. I don't know how players using heavier sticks can get the finger control necessary for good sticking. They just make it work I guess, but I only use them for practice.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
Unreal. I don't know how players using heavier sticks can get the finger control necessary for good sticking. They just make it work I guess, but I only use them for practice.
I don't use heavy sticks for anything other than pad work. I'll practice with 5Bs and play with 5As. But Tony Williiams was a special kind of monster chops drummer. He was so good anything he did was beyond reproach.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
having "grown up" in the marching world, I HAVE to use thicker sticks b/e it is what my hands are used to. And you get used to using your wrists and fingers for intricate/fast stick work,

Right now, I use a Vic Firth 3A for set (all genres, metal, rock, jazz, country) because anything smaller feel like nothing in my hand. I used to use the VF Custom Generals, but like the feel of the 3A's better. Also, I have never cracked a cymbal, and never broke a drum head using bigger sticks...I would say that I hit medium hard when appropriate...

I can't even imagine using a 5A or B, or a 7A or B....they fly right out of my hands.

I don't like the Thomas Lang sticks only b/c of the bead...the weight does not bother me
 

gmiller598

Senior Member
Neil Peart was one of the hardest hitting drummers I’ve ever seen and his 747 aren’t that big. I’m used to using marching sticks for most of my life but I don’t like anything bigger than a 5a on drumset. I think it’s just another piece in the package to developing your sound. Technique, head selection, and stick selection all play into it.

The larger sticks do seem to naturally produce more volume and projection at a relaxed level as long as the mass of the stick is distributed properly. You can also produce a fuller sound with a 5a if you have some with weight distribution towards the tip. I believe the VF Stanton Moore model was designed that way for example.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Neil Peart was one of the hardest hitting drummers I’ve ever seen and his 747 aren’t that big. I’m used to using marching sticks for most of my life but I don’t like anything bigger than a 5a on drumset. I think it’s just another piece in the package to developing your sound. Technique, head selection, and stick selection all play into it.

The larger sticks do seem to naturally produce more volume and projection at a relaxed level as long as the mass of the stick is distributed properly. You can also produce a fuller sound with a 5a if you have some with weight distribution towards the tip. I believe the VF Stanton Moore model was designed that way for example.
Peart also used them backwards...butt end first...being a Peart fan boi, I tried that for years back in the 80's, but could not get used to the feel of the sticks backwards in my hands..

I might have to check out the Stanton sticks, but I really like the feel of the 3A's for now. They are not as big as the Lang sticks.
 

gmiller598

Senior Member
Peart also used them backwards...butt end first...being a Peart fan boi, I tried that for years back in the 80's, but could not get used to the feel of the sticks backwards in my hands..

I might have to check out the Stanton sticks, but I really like the feel of the 3A's for now. They are not as big as the Lang sticks.
He did switch to holding them the correct way starting with Test for Echo in ‘96. I’m sure as a result of his Freddie Gruber studies. I know the 747 has more mass toward the shaft and tip as well to assist in projection.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Back in my strictly rock-n-roll days, I used Regal Tip 5BNs, playing the butt of the stick with my left hand (traditional grip) and the nylon tip with my right hand for the cymbal work. I found that it was quite easy to adjust the "out of kilter" difference in volume when playing rolls or patterns.

Later, I learned how to achieve the volume I wanted with my left hand via leverage rather than the brute force and heavy weight of the stick butt. To this day, I still use 5BNs for pop/rock/country gigs. That's a very versatile size.

GeeDeeEmm
 
I am not all that familiar with either of those two but another drummer I know who played with tree trunks as sticks was Tony Williams. AND he hit harder than most drummers. And with those black dot heads no less.

And he turned the left stick around backwards. Good lord.

I know that performance is from the Blue Note concert, but it's still worth pointing out that my GOD what a band: Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, Bobby Hutcherson, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and, oh yes, Anthony Williams.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
When I played in a high energy rock band I moved up to some pretty big sticks. It really helped pull a bigger sound out of the drums and I didn't feel like I needed to overplay to get it.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
And he turned the left stick around backwards. Good lord.

I know that performance is from the Blue Note concert, but it's still worth pointing out that my GOD what a band: Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, Bobby Hutcherson, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and, oh yes, Anthony Williams.
Yep. That was a great band alright. I had the good fortune to catch Tony with his Quintet, Mulgrew Miller, Wallace Roney, Bill Pierce and Ira Coleman at The Village Vanguard. OMG!!! He was so freaking sick. He was also quite intense. Almost too intense. During the set some moron was taking some pictures and had the flash on. They always make the announcement but this guy didn't get the message. And someone should have said something to him to make him stop. That didn't happen. Tony stopped the music and then proceeded to monologue this angry tirade. Instead of finishing his tirade and going to back to playing, he just pulled the band off the stage and cut the set short. I was soooooooo freaking bummed. But Tony was one of my all time favorite drummers.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Back in my strictly rock-n-roll days, I used Regal Tip 5BNs, playing the butt of the stick with my left hand (traditional grip) and the nylon tip with my right hand for the cymbal work.
Mike Portnoy does this too. His drum tech will wrap the butt end of one stick and the taper of the other. Then have them arranged on the kit in such a way as so Mike can grab the right one for the desired hand.
 
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