Playing Out for the First Time tomorrow

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I am playing out for the first time tomorrow and I am really, really nervous about it.

It’s going to be in a completely different environment than I am used to practicing in.

whew, I can not explain to you how nervous I am rn

any pointers?

I know this is probably a really unoriginal thread idea and that I could pointers from previous threads, but I need some support right now 🥺
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Don't distress yourself further by attempting to overcome your nerves. Instead, embrace them. You can convert them to energy by surrendering control. Remember that some degree of anxiety is productive in that it keeps us alert. To have zero unease is to be sedated or dead. You don't want to be either. Focus on the goal of having fun. I predict that you'll loosen up dramatically after a song or two. All will be fine, and you'll have a great experience under your belt to report to us.

Good luck!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
what is so different about it?
 

J-W

Well-known member
It's perfectly normal to feel that way. Even those that have done it for decades get nervous. It's just part of the experience........another element of excitement in playing live. Like C.M Jones said, embrace it.
Playing live is all about being in the moment. Nothing else matters. Once you're a few songs in, you'll start to relax and enter that zen state and then suddenly it's over before you want it to end. Enjoy every bit of it..........from the rush of adrenaline to the connection you make with the other band members and the audience.

I almost miss all that. Good for you for getting out there and doing it. I'd wish you luck, but you don't need it. You'll do just fine.
 

roncadillac

Member
I have been consistently playing in live original bands for twenty years now and I still get nervous pretty much every time. Those nerves have evolved over the years to become less about me personally and more about the situation but they haven't gone away. The most important thing anyone ever told me is an absolute truth: 99% of the people in the audience won't notice 99% of your mistakes.

Make sure you practice, make sure you have a set list (with notes, like "4 click intro" or "guitar intro"), make sure you stretch, and mostly importantly... Make sure you have fun.
 

Jasta 11

Well-known member
Best of luck, dont sweat it, you're not the only one out there. ( not a one man band thing right?) have a good time with the rest of the band and do your best.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I am playing out for the first time tomorrow and I am really, really nervous about it.

It’s going to be in a completely different environment than I am used to practicing in.

whew, I can not explain to you how nervous I am rn

any pointers?

I know this is probably a really unoriginal thread idea and that I could pointers from previous threads, but I need some support right now 🥺
We are all waiting to hear about Friday!(y)🙏🥁
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
It's perfectly normal to feel that way. Even those that have done it for decades get nervous. It's just part of the experience........another element of excitement in playing live. Like C.M Jones said, embrace it.
Playing live is all about being in the moment. Nothing else matters. Once you're a few songs in, you'll start to relax and enter that zen state and then suddenly it's over before you want it to end. Enjoy every bit of it..........from the rush of adrenaline to the connection you make with the other band members and the audience.

I almost miss all that. Good for you for getting out there and doing it. I'd wish you luck, but you don't need it. You'll do just fine.
Great response JW- I agree.
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Try and trick your brain into turning the negative energy into positive energy (i.e. excitement) as it's the same effect.

At the end of the day it's a gig. Things may well go wrong (singer misses a cue, guitarist makes a bum note, you may miss a drum and hit a rim...etc) at the end of the day most audiences really won't notice.

Like with driving, concentrate on the road in front of you. Not behind you. If there are any mistakes keep your focus on what's coming up and don't dwel on the past. Move on quickly.

Just try to enjoy it, it's not life and death. It's a gig

I'm sure you'll be great! Enjoy that lovely adrenaline and endorphins afterward (you'll see what I mean soon enough!)

Fingers crossed for you, keep us updated with how it went.
 
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jimb

Member
This'll help. Even the greats mess up. Steve Jordan was late on a crash this week...vid shows Keef acknowledging the fluff.
 
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iCe

Senior Member
In the beginning i was nervous when i saw people watching me. I use ear protection now, but back then i had my own bubble where i can only hear the band. If i closed my eyes, it was just me grooving and there was nothing else in the world. Sound a bit vague maybe... Anyway, helped me get through the first years just to close my eyes when i started getting nervous and just focus on playing; there was nobody there, just me (like playing along to track).

These days i'm pretty confident behind the set, but like stated before i too get itchy before we start and those are just the pre-gig butterflies. A lot of factors influence the feel of a gig (crowd response for example), but most of the time after the first 4 songs i start to relax.

Being nervous does have it's pro's though; i'm super focused and i hear all the mistakes. Watching/listening back to recordings they are always really minor flaws that only i hear (friends hardly notice them), but at that moment it feels sound like a huge mistake and that pushes me into super-focused-mode; all the hits are perfect after that.

Besides that... hearing is everything. If i hear the rest of the band over the monitors, i'm good. Take time to adjust your monitors correctly. Learned the hard way that trusting the sound tech isn't always the best choice; spent a few minutes dailing in what you want to hear. The most perfect gigs were the ones where my monitor was perfect; a bit of guitar, a bit of bass, bassdrum too so i could hear the pulse because sometime i just couldn't hear and feel the bass drum. And the vocals always the loudest; if the singer started a verse too early we all adjusted to that, but if i can't hear the singer i really have no clue where we are in the song.

Above else... just chill, enjoy, soak up all the atmosphere and have a blast :)
 

pocket player

Junior Member
I am playing out for the first time tomorrow and I am really, really nervous about it.

It’s going to be in a completely different environment than I am used to practicing in.

whew, I can not explain to you how nervous I am rn

any pointers?

I know this is probably a really unoriginal thread idea and that I could pointers from previous threads, but I need some support right now 🥺
Great that you are playing out . my suggestions 1 get a good nights rest
2 stretch and warm up before the gig
3 get there early check out the place
4 if you can set up early,before the guitar plarer arrives and rushes your butt
5 stay hydrated all day
6 dont eat a real heavy meal before the gig
7 shut off the worry channel and turn on the fun channel
if you make a mistake,forget it keep playing,and dont think about it.

8 You know the songs ,you will do fine , good luck !!!
**** Remember to take your Flowmax ha ha ha
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
I wish I could be there! Do your thing man, no one else can

Don't drink too much coffee/energy drink, better to be a tad lethargic starting off and warm into it
 

J-W

Well-known member
Well? How did it go?

I love all the excellent advice...................... even if given after the gig. 😃
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
Well, honestly; i did a poor job last night.

I take full personal responsibility and figure that it was due to my lack of experience and skill. I was unrehearsed (i knew the music, we just didn’t have time to go over it before the show) and couldn’t hear any of the band members (I know some included in their advice that I should be sure that I hear everyone, but there was nothing that could’ve been done about it). Had to rely on visuality of keyboard player’s hands/bass players fingers for tempo (because there was no click), so I struggled A LOT with that. BUT I figure that none of that should matter and I should’ve been able to hang in there regardless. I couldn’t.

Huge confidence breaker (not that I had a ton to begin with). Kinda making me reconsider altogether. Thanks everyone for the advice and support. You guys are great. Might take a little break from the forum. Don’t really feel like “drummer” rn 😂
 
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Al Strange

Well-known member
Well, honestly; i did a poor job last night.

I take full personal responsibility and figure that it was due to my lack of experience and skill. I was unrehearsed (i knew the music, we just didn’t have time to go over it before the show) and couldn’t hear any of the band members (I know some included in their advice that I should be sure that I hear everyone, but there was nothing that could’ve been done about it). Had to rely on visuality of keyboard player’s hands/bass players fingers for tempo (because there was no click), so I struggled A LOT with that. BUT I figure that none of that shouldn’t matter and I should’ve been able to hang in there regardless. I couldn’t.

Huge confidence breaker (not that I had a ton to begin with). Kinda making me reconsider altogether. Thanks everyone for the advice and support. You guys are great. Might take a little break from the forum. Don’t really feel like “drummer” rn 😂
Don’t be down on yourself mate. Sometimes the sound is cr@p and you can’t hear anything. I played a gig once with nothing coming through my monitors. All I could hear was a mush of noise and my drums bouncing off the back wall of the hall half a second after I’d hit them. Horrendous gig but it didn’t make me a bad player! Keep smashing it and know your material inside out so you can still get through these worst case scenarios! :) (y)
 
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