Pipe Band Snare Example

Phil A.

Junior Member
That's called trad grip. It born out of necessity when marching drums were slung a bit slanted (left higher than right, so the left hand will be awkward playing in matched grip), and get carried on with marching and jazz drummers.
Maybe I wasn't clear; I meant the particular thumb technique the pipe band drummers use in their traditional grip hand. They have a way of dribbling the stick that I never really see with the drumset or even drum corps traditional grip players.
 

Iristone

Well-known member
Maybe I wasn't clear; I meant the particular thumb technique the pipe band drummers use in their traditional grip hand. They have a way of dribbling the stick that I never really see with the drumset or even drum corps traditional grip players.
Then I think it's maybe to get extra volume? :)
 

adamosmianski

Senior Member
But my question remains, what was the playing style like before plastic heads? I’ve wondered that for years.
As have I. I know nothing about pipe band music, but kevlar seems a really modern thing to be using in what is presumably a pretty old tradition.

You can search the Internet for Alex Duthart, who is credited with revolutionizing pipe band snare drumming. He was born in 1925 so he was around for the switch from calfskin to plastic heads.
This is very cool!

Nothing played on Kevlar is music. You can display athletic skill on a Kevlar head, but that’s it. It’s not music, nor meant to be.
That's a pretty closed-minded attitude, no? There are people out there making music with trash cans. I can see not liking kevlar, but to say one can't create music with it, or questioning the intentions of the manufacturers, seems a bit silly. Admittedly, drum and bugle corps is far more about pageantry and precision, but it's still music. Or guys like Jojo Mayer, using it to try to recreate drum machine sounds. Not your cup of tea, fine. But not music?

 
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