Peter Erskine's New Signature Jazz Snare Drum

Icetech

Gold Member
Kinda want one... I have had a yearning for the yellow tama kid peter was hawking a few years ago also.. (just got a thing for yellow kits, thanks tony!)
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
I hope so. Erskine appeared to be very picky/finicky/particular about the gear on the Tama videos in which he promoted his yellow Star kit and his signature popcorn snare (which I wanted until I saw the $1100 price tag).
Making me ask the question: Would you take an $1,100 snare to some bar-basher gig or would it be a home body drum?
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
Making me ask the question: Would you take an $1,100 snare to some bar-basher gig or would it be a home body drum?
Yes. 🤣

I take ‘em out. I ain’t playing any Wembley in the near future.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Yes. 🤣

I take ‘em out. I ain’t playing any Wembley in the near future.
Same here.
I don't have any really expensive snares, but of the ones I've improved, they cost as much now as if I bought them new that way.
The only "home body" drum I have is my 26" kick. Only because it's WAY too big to lug around on gigs.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Making me ask the question: Would you take an $1,100 snare to some bar-basher gig or would it be a home body drum?

I've been taking my 135th anniversary Gretsch on gigs - but I also don't play bars ;-) I feel pretty good about it being at home in theaters, etc.
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
One reason I've dropped to owning only one snare for now is to force myself to play my Music City Custom on all occasions. If I had other options, I know what would happen:

I. Hot and humid outdoor gig. Can't expose the MCC to such extremes.

II. Transport in subzero temps. Don't risk the MCC.

III. Potential for rain at an uncovered venue. The MCC can't get wet. Keep it safe and sound at the practice space.

IV. Gigging in a setting riddled with inebriates. The MCC is too refined for mischief. Let it rest in cloistered comfort at the homestead.

Now I have no choice, unless I decide to get a backup, which I don't intend to do at the moment. But the first time I have to play in any of the above conditions, Sweetwater might be receiving a snare order. :D
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
One reason I've dropped to owning only one snare for now is to force myself to play my Music City Custom on all occasions. If I had other options, I know what would happen:

I. Hot and humid outdoor gig. Can't expose the MCC to such extremes.

II. Transport in subzero temps. Don't risk the MCC.

III. Potential for rain at an uncovered venue. The MCC can't get wet. Keep it safe and sound at the practice space.

IV. Gigging in a setting riddled with inebriates. The MCC is too refined for mischief. Let it rest in cloistered comfort at the homestead.

Now I have no choice, unless I decide to get a backup, which I don't intend to do at the moment. But the first time I have to play in any of the above conditions, Sweetwater might be receiving a snare order. :D
It being wood, I fully get why you wouldn't do all this. And at that price, it's like my sister-in-law with her violin (at a similar cost): Even fully encased, she'll carry it into places like it's her newborn for the very reasons you stated here.

My Gretsch is mahogany, but not nearly as valuable & the Rogers PowerTone is chrome over steel. So depending on what sound I'm after will dictate what "tuned-for-combat" snare I bring. ;)
 

drumnut87

Silver Member
i like hybrid shells ( i wanna own a premier gen-x someday) so this tickles my interest :)
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
It being wood, I fully get why you wouldn't do all this. And at that price, it's like my sister-in-law with her violin (at a similar cost): Even fully encased, she'll carry it into places like it's her newborn for the very reasons you stated here.

My Gretsch is mahogany, but not nearly as valuable & the Rogers PowerTone is chrome over steel. So depending on what sound I'm after will dictate what "tuned-for-combat" snare I bring. ;)
Really, I'm not all that worried about it. This snare has such incredible tone (and a generous tuning range) that I really want to play no substitutes at the moment. I'll probably pick up something else down the line, just to have a second option, but it's not a pressing concern right now.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
One reason I've dropped to owning only one snare for now is to force myself to play my Music City Custom on all occasions. If I had other options, I know what would happen:

I. Hot and humid outdoor gig. Can't expose the MCC to such extremes.

II. Transport in subzero temps. Don't risk the MCC.

III. Potential for rain at an uncovered venue. The MCC can't get wet. Keep it safe and sound at the practice space.

IV. Gigging in a setting riddled with inebriates. The MCC is too refined for mischief. Let it rest in cloistered comfort at the homestead.

Now I have no choice, unless I decide to get a backup, which I don't intend to do at the moment. But the first time I have to play in any of the above conditions, Sweetwater might be receiving a snare order. :D
It’s for these very reasons I own an aluminum snare.
 

JimmyM

Gold Member
A beautiful snare both sonically and visually. Erskine is right about the drum's ability to "spin on a dime." Shallower snares (i.e., 5.5" and smaller) can do it all, taking both low and high tunings quite well and supplying sensitivity and articulation throughout. Deeper shells have always seemed less adaptable to me. Though they add body to higher tunings, they can be wild and without focus at lower ones, and the extra space between the batter head and resonant head alters the feel of the drum in a way that doesn't meet my approval. This is why I play nothing deeper than 5.5".
I can dig that. Makes sense. I kind of feel what you're talking about with lower tunings on my Ludwig 6.5" x 14". I got mine a lot more articulate by installing heavy 12 strand snares like they're supposed to have :D but I've got a medium tuning on it and plan to stick in that range or higher because that's what it does best IMHO. Would like a less deep one at some point, though it sure as heck isn't going to be $1100! I'll be lucky to swing a beater Acrolite!
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
I can dig that. Makes sense. I kind of feel what you're talking about with lower tunings on my Ludwig 6.5" x 14". I got mine a lot more articulate by installing heavy 12 strand snares like they're supposed to have :D but I've got a medium tuning on it and plan to stick in that range or higher because that's what it does best IMHO. Would like a less deep one at some point, though it sure as heck isn't going to be $1100! I'll be lucky to swing a beater Acrolite!
I've always believed that when it comes to lower snare tunings, "the shallower the better" rings true. Kenny Arnoff explains that he plays a 14"x5" as a rule, but when he wants to go really low, he doesn't turn to a deeper shell; instead, he increases diameter and subtracts from depth, enlisting a 15"x4" snare, which gives him a very low tone while promoting a clean and focused note. That makes sense to me.
 

JimmyM

Gold Member
I've always believed that when it comes to lower snare tunings, "the shallower the better" rings true. Kenny Arnoff explains that he plays a 14"x5" as a rule, but when he wants to go really low, he doesn't turn to a deeper shell; instead, he increases diameter and subtracts from depth, enlisting a 15"x4" snare, which gives him a very low tone while promoting a clean and focused note. That makes sense to me.
Kenny is one of my very favorite drummers in the world, so I take what he says very seriously. I suppose it works on the same principles as bass...I find bass cabs that reproduce super low end to be flubby and have poor low note distinguish-ability, so I use cabs with a low lows rolloff or I add a high pass filter.
 
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