Pet peeve regarding drum sizes.

Darth Vater

Senior Member
I would think that if someone was buying a new, modern day kit that they'd either want standard or fast size toms. Why is it that I see all these kits with a mix of both? If the rack toms are 10x8 and 12x9 why is the floor tom 16x14? Same with the racks being 10x7 and 12x8 with a full 16x16 size floor tom. Makes no sense to me. Tama Star Walnut = short racks and square floor. Bo's new Design series = standard racks and short floors. I mean c'mon, make up our minds please

Memo to Mfrs: get it together.
 

John Q. Drummer

Well-known member
Actually, I agree 100% with your sentiments. I do not understand putting a 12x9 rack tom with a "fast" sized floor tom. Seems like it should be a square size floor tom. Conversely if your rack tom is a more standard 12x8 size, then go with a "fast" size floor tom. It's more consistent to my way of thinking.

Related side note: I don't care for 12x9 rack toms, but I've had a couple of kits with that size that I've been able to make work, but I've since sold them all. I don't care for the sound of that size or the positioning limitations, and I'm a taller bloke! I go out of my way for "standard" depth rack toms, but I like the slightly shorter floor toms, like what Yamaha does. (1 inch shallower than square, so a 16" diameter floor is only 15" deep. Works well.)
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Well, an old guy like myself would suggest the 10x7, 12x8, and 16x16 were standard sizes once upon a time. ;)

As for the shorter floor tom with fast-sized rack toms, who knows? I suspect they don't worry about whether a size is standard or not. My guess is, they just include the most popular sizes in their lines.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Then there are guys like me who are still about the power toms and bigger kick sizes.;)

I'm with you 100% though. I understand that fusion kits should have shorter racks, while standard kits have the sizes you mention.
After that...it's custom time for the player.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Actually, I agree 100% with your sentiments. I do not understand putting a 12x9 rack tom with a "fast" sized floor tom. Seems like it should be a square size floor tom. Conversely if your rack tom is a more standard 12x8 size, then go with a "fast" size floor tom. It's more consistent to my way of thinking.

Related side note: I don't care for 12x9 rack toms, but I've had a couple of kits with that size that I've been able to make work, but I've since sold them all. I don't care for the sound of that size or the positioning limitations, and I'm a taller bloke! I go out of my way for "standard" depth rack toms, but I like the slightly shorter floor toms, like what Yamaha does. (1 inch shallower than square, so a 16" diameter floor is only 15" deep. Works well.)
12x9 *is* F.A.S.T-sized. 12x8 is standard.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
This is one reason I don't buy shell packs but rather order directly from Pearl the exact dimensions I want: 12"x8", 16"x16", and 22"x16". Omitting my snare, that's my entire kit. I order three drums, and I'm done. Could I save money by going with a shell pack? Sure, but I'd also receive a few drums I had no intention of playing. Putting a 10" tom or a 14" floor tom up for sale isn't a headache I want to deal with.
 

John Q. Drummer

Well-known member
12x9 *is* F.A.S.T-sized. 12x8 is standard.
You sir are 100% correct. Forgot that DW uses goofy nomenclature for their sizing. Case in point, they claim that a 16" x 14" floor tom size is standard, according to them. One of the many reasons I'm not super big about DW drums.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
The weird sizing is kind of a pet peeve of mine too. But I kinda look at it as the compromise of mid-range kits. They keep the prices down by not having to make every possible size and telling the consumer to deal with what they offer.

OTOH - in DW world, this is why the high end kits exist. There you can get whatever size you want. So long as you pay for it and are willing to wait up to 12-weeks!
 

Pootle

Well-known member
This is one reason I don't buy shell packs but rather order directly from Pearl the exact dimensions I want: 12"x8", 16"x16", and 22"x16". Omitting my snare, that's my entire kit. I order three drums, and I'm done. Could I save money by going with a shell pack? Sure, but I'd also receive a few drums I had no intention of playing. Putting a 10" tom or a 14" floor tom up for sale isn't a headache I want to deal with.

To your point, I was recently looking at which companies produced a 12x8, 16x16, 22x14/16 shell pack in the £1,500 - £2,000 range. You’re quickly down to two; Tama Starclassic or a Pearl Session Select and that’s before you look at the finishes.. For standard sizes, it does seem ludicrous to have to go down the custom route.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I guess I'm easy to please since I like modern sizes. My Gretsch kit uses standard toms and square floor toms whereas my DW kit uses F.A.S.T. toms and short floor toms. Both kits sound amazing.

My older Yamaha kit features power toms which I don't mind because the kick drum is 20" but I don't care for deep toms on 22" kick drums. Too hard to angle properly - for me.
 
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Vandalay

Member
Im not crazy about a 12 inch ride tom on an 18 inch kick, I know its the standard, but it just looks "top-heavy" to me
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
I went from a full set of concert toms monster kit in the 70's to a scaled back kit of power toms with shallower suspended floor toms in the 90's to a traditional sized kit in in 2007. It took awhile but I finally realized that old school sizes just work.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
On one of the Drummer's Review videos, the host (Nolly) mentioned the possible theory behind floors being shorter is to allow for more space under the drum thus creating room for sustain.
One of my sets has shorter floors and another has square floors and neither have any shortage of sustain, so I dunno if the theory pans out.

Shorter is a little easier to lug around though.
 

Pootle

Well-known member
On one of the Drummer's Review videos, the host (Nolly) mentioned the possible theory behind floors being shorter is to allow for more space under the drum thus creating room for sustain.
One of my sets has shorter floors and another has square floors and neither have any shortage of sustain, so I dunno if the theory pans out.

Shorter is a little easier to lug around though.
A good one for those boys over at Sounds like a Drum to look into.
 
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