Performing and being asked to push back as far as you can

LarryJ

Well-known member
That's why I take a 20/12/14 setup with a 14" deep bass drum. Fits anywhere and doesn't sound like a toy.

If a gig is really small I'll strip down to kick, snare, hats and ride

This.

I too take a 20/12/14 with a bass drum mount for the ride to small venues and jettison things that don't fit. Playing one venue weekly with kick, snare, hats and ride. Not the most fun, but pays well.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
This.

I too take a 20/12/14 with a bass drum mount for the ride to small venues and jettison things that don't fit. Playing one venue weekly with kick, snare, hats and ride. Not the most fun, but pays well.
Kick, hats, snare and ride is the meat and potatoes of drumming.

Think of the pack down time at the end of the night!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Part of being a gigging drummer means accepting (and making the most of) the environment in which you're performing. I've never really been one to complain about limited space, poor acoustics, less than ideal temps, or similar inadequacies. I do my best to interpret every opportunity to drum as a privilege. I extract a lot more joy from playing when I maintain that frame of mind.

I looked at it this way too...how do I overcome the challenge? what is in my tool box that will let me overcome this.

I learned it the quickest when I had a few gigs where I had to play a left-handed set up on the spot. Not being allowed to change the set up in any way. That could have been a disaster...but I quickly adjusted fills - had to get creative - and also put to test my open hand, and left foot bass drum skills. Pretty much after that, there has never bee na situation I couldn't adapt to...
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
This goes in a couple of different directions. Some of the venues I play locally, and probably will play again, have rather small stage spaces. In fact, a place we used to play until it got sold last year, called "The Vogue" was our measurement reference because of its famously small dimensions. "Guys, this is a pretty decent stage! At least six Vogues!"

What I often find, and YMMV, is that places that have skimped on the size of the stage will also skimp on paying you and publicizing you. If this (gratefully) isn't the case but the stage is rather small, you have to adjust. Consolidate your stands, pare down your kit, and work together to fit in the available space.

if it's your band, well, this is less about actual logistics and more about respect and consideration. In this case I feel spoiled by all of my bands, because I struggle to remember a time where I had to fight for space for my kit. Like others, I get there plenty early and stake the space with my rug; but then again, I also make sure I ALWAYS fit on that rug. I also feel like there's no misunderstanding between my bands' members for the amount of space needed for each person. If you feel like this isn't the case for you in your band, that bears thought and perhaps action.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I've been on small stages but never got that cramped.
 
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