Percussion Music Major...

drummer_14_92

Senior Member
Hey y'all. Is anyone here a current freshman majoring in music? If so. What are your music school standards? I am thinking of switching a major from meteorology and music keeps calling.
 

Skitch

Pioneer Member
Hey y'all. Is anyone here a current freshman majoring in music? If so. What are your music school standards? I am thinking of switching a major from meteorology and music keeps calling.
I'm guessing that you are at the Universtiy of Oklahoma? Why not a double major?

Mike

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drummer_14_92

Senior Member
I don't know what I would do for a double major, I am thinking of possibilities. Also thinking of a minor in guitar.I should mention that because of finances I am on an ROTC scholarship so I can only be there 4 years. I can't finish a meteorology degree in less than 6 years or so...(mostly through prerequisite classes...)
 

Skitch

Pioneer Member
I don't know what I would do for a double major, I am thinking of possibilities. Also thinking of a minor in guitar.I should mention that because of finances I am on an ROTC scholarship so I can only be there 4 years. I can't finish a meteorology degree in less than 6 years or so...(mostly through prerequisite classes...)
While I am an educated musician, most of my education was playing in bands out on the road. I have six binder books of charts from all of the songs I had to learn. Your situation sounds similiar to a guy I know who studied music at a college in Georgia. He studied alot of marimba and mallets and now works in a music store.

None who is hiring you to play music is going to ask you if you have a degree in music; they are going to want to hear you play and that is the proof.


Mike

http://www.mikemccraw.com
http://www.dominoretroplate.com
http://www.patentcoachmike.com
http://www.youtube.com/drummermikemccraw
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http://www.facebook.com/mike.mccraw
http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemccraw
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caddywumpus

Platinum Member
The nice thing about being a music major is the concentrated time in which you are completely engulfed in the world of having to practice for your weekly lessons, having to show up for multiple ensembles you're involved in, learning theory and sight-singing and ear-training, and making contacts that you may be able to utilize later on in your professional life.

...BUT, you can do ALL of these things on your own with method books and lessons and spare time. You can't necessarily do that with other majors where you need more specialized instruction and hands-on labs and stuff. Unless you are DEAD SERIOUS about becoming a full-time musician, and NOTHING ELSE will EVER do, consider a different major and save studying music and practicing for your spare time.

If you want to get a degree in something that will help you much more in the music business, take business classes. Minoring in music wouldn't be a bad choice.
 

Skitch

Pioneer Member
The nice thing about being a music major is the concentrated time in which you are completely engulfed in the world of having to practice for your weekly lessons, having to show up for multiple ensembles you're involved in, learning theory and sight-singing and ear-training, and making contacts that you may be able to utilize later on in your professional life.

...BUT, you can do ALL of these things on your own with method books and lessons and spare time. You can't necessarily do that with other majors where you need more specialized instruction and hands-on labs and stuff. Unless you are DEAD SERIOUS about becoming a full-time musician, and NOTHING ELSE will EVER do, consider a different major and save studying music and practicing for your spare time.

If you want to get a degree in something that will help you much more in the music business, take business classes. Minoring in music wouldn't be a bad choice.
Pretty good advice!

Mike

http://www.mikemccraw.com
http://www.dominoretroplate.com
http://www.patentcoachmike.com
http://www.youtube.com/drummermikemccraw
http://www.myspace.com/drummermikemccraw
http://www.facebook.com/mike.mccraw
http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemccraw
http://twitter.com/mikemccraw]
 

bigd

Silver Member
The nice thing about being a music major is the concentrated time in which you are completely engulfed in the world of having to practice for your weekly lessons, having to show up for multiple ensembles you're involved in, learning theory and sight-singing and ear-training, and making contacts that you may be able to utilize later on in your professional life.

...BUT, you can do ALL of these things on your own with method books and lessons and spare time. You can't necessarily do that with other majors where you need more specialized instruction and hands-on labs and stuff. Unless you are DEAD SERIOUS about becoming a full-time musician, and NOTHING ELSE will EVER do, consider a different major and save studying music and practicing for your spare time.

If you want to get a degree in something that will help you much more in the music business, take business classes. Minoring in music wouldn't be a bad choice.
I think it depends on what you consider the music business. You definately don't need a degree to play in a popular band and try getting a record deal. But if you want a serious music career like playing in an orchestra, teaching, or even working in the music equipment industry you really need a solid background. A degree and the contacts you make will go a long way.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I think it depends on what you consider the music business. You definately don't need a degree to play in a popular band and try getting a record deal. But if you want a serious music career like playing in an orchestra, teaching, or even working in the music equipment industry you really need a solid background. A degree and the contacts you make will go a long way.
That all depends on what you consider a "serious music career". I know several people who have the most "serious" of music positions who don't take it very seriously, and others who play in popular bands who DO.

Yes, my degree makes it MUCH easier to get my foot in the door with lots of gigs...you don't have to explain your musical background quite so much--it's almost as if you automatically qualify. Teaching in the public school system or at the college level is really the only one that REQUIRES a degree, though, across the board. There are certain positions with certain employers where they make it a requirement, but you can find other similar positions that don't. Heck, even the symphony orchestra and ballet theatre orchestra merely require an audition.
 

bigd

Silver Member
That all depends on what you consider a "serious music career". I know several people who have the most "serious" of music positions who don't take it very seriously, and others who play in popular bands who DO.

Yes, my degree makes it MUCH easier to get my foot in the door with lots of gigs...you don't have to explain your musical background quite so much--it's almost as if you automatically qualify. Teaching in the public school system or at the college level is really the only one that REQUIRES a degree, though, across the board. There are certain positions with certain employers where they make it a requirement, but you can find other similar positions that don't. Heck, even the symphony orchestra and ballet theatre orchestra merely require an audition.
Good luck even getting a symphony audition if your resume doesn't have the right conservatory/ college names on it. There are several guys I went to college with who are in the percussion instrument industry/ educational dvd industry also and if it wasn't for our teacher/college they'd never have gotten in the door.
 
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