Pedal Settings Matter

Here's a before and after video, me making subtle changes to the angles of the footboard and beater.
Many times I feel frustrated that I make progress and then fall back, and I wanted to mention that pedal settings can be overlooked.

It is such a delicate situation of finding that balance of where you burry the beater or get a good rebound, and it can be the difference of feeling
like the pedal is playing you vs you playing the music.

I just took the approach mentioned of 45 degree beater/ 30 degree footboard, then going from there, you can kinda feel where you need to make the adjustments from there, if you ankle bounce you can see the basketball type rebound you are getting. If the beater tends to not quite make it far enough every time, then try different adjustments (beater/footboard/beater height). On the other end of the spectrum you don't want to have the beater feel as if it's range of motion is being stopped by the drum head, which is burying the beater.

I'm sure many pros here already know all this, but it is easily overlooked.
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
Adjustments matter, but too many adjustable parts can be overwhelming.

I bought some Eliminators when they first came out, within like 6 months. I was so excited for them to arrive, only to be completely lost on how I wanted them set up.

Fast forward like 25 years. Round cam, chain, Powershifter, that's all I want. The rest can be achieved through spring settings and head tension.

Live and learn (and lose $$$ in the process) I suppose.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
Each to their own - played my DW5000's straight out of the box and never adjusted anything. Best part of 20 years later, still not adjusted anything.
I guess there might be a "better" setting - but if it ain't broke..............🤷‍♂️
 

jamiethecfh

Junior Member
Totally agree! My very first double pedal was a second hand cheapish single chain Mapex pedal (I’m not sure the model) but the settings my mate used were absolutely perfect for me, for the 3 years I used it…I bought the chain driven Iron Cobras (the cool limited edition chrome ones!) and it took me a good year to get a decent feel for them, despite them being ‘better’ in pretty much every respect. If I had just spent an evening adjusting and testing when I first got them, I would have saved a lot of gigs never feeling quite comfortable! Made sure to put in the time when I got my new pedals - they are now perfect!
 

Tiges

Well-known Member
Here's a before and after video, me making subtle changes to the angles of the footboard and beater.
Many times I feel frustrated that I make progress and then fall back, and I wanted to mention that pedal settings can be overlooked.

It is such a delicate situation of finding that balance of where you burry the beater or get a good rebound, and it can be the difference of feeling
like the pedal is playing you vs you playing the music.

I just took the approach mentioned of 45 degree beater/ 30 degree footboard, then going from there, you can kinda feel where you need to make the adjustments from there, if you ankle bounce you can see the basketball type rebound you are getting. If the beater tends to not quite make it far enough every time, then try different adjustments (beater/footboard/beater height). On the other end of the spectrum you don't want to have the beater feel as if it's range of motion is being stopped by the drum head, which is burying the beater.

I'm sure many pros here already know all this, but it is easily overlooked.
What pedal are you using its not going to feel the same as hitting a acoustic bass drum.
 
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Chris Whitten

Silver Member
The whole kit is electric right, including the bass drum?
I'm not hearing any difference in tone, am I just hearing the pedal hit an e-drum pad?
Like Keef, I just play the pedal out of the box usually, unless it's really loose or really tight.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I think there’s something to be said for practicing on different pedals regularly so you can be flexible. And there’s also something to be said for pedals that are very simple to adjust, like the Trick pedals. Just saying
 
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