Peavy radial pro 1000

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Anyone else notice the congruency with Peavey advertising?

View attachment 104838

Also for layered context, I’m guessing he’s no coffee aficionado, or he might be?...
Is that seriously a metal snare with a radial bridge? How does that work without penetrating the shell?
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Is that seriously a metal snare with a radial bridge? How does that work without penetrating the shell?
Yep - It’s like the free floating system, isn’t Pearl innovative?

Peaveys signal words in advertising in two posters: ‘Robin’ and ‘Mugs’ 😂
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Yep - It’s like the free floating system, isn’t Pearl innovative?
It's not like Pearl's cradle. There is a radial bridge at top and bottom. If the radial bridge isnt physically attached to the shell, I dont see how it holds any tension. Pearl's cradle allows for tension from both heads, thus creating a pressurized "sandwich" with the shell. The Peavey snare isnt like that. It has a radial bridge for each head, there is no pressurized sandwich effect.

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This is a real Radial Pro snare:

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The difference is clear.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
It's not like Pearl's cradle. There is a radial bridge at top and bottom. If the radial bridge isnt physically attached to the shell, I dont see how it holds any tension. Pearl's cradle allows for tension from both heads, thus creating a pressurized "sandwich" with the shell. The Peavey snare isnt like that. It has a radial bridge for each head, there is no pressurized sandwich effect.

View attachment 104882
Yes Peavey has radial bridge, but it’s still lug less held together by rim structure like free floating basket, wherever tension may be kept.

To me it looks like a shell using their radial bridge system, just to show it CAN be done as well.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
To me it looks like a shell using their radial bridge system, just to show it CAN be done as well.
But how do they attach it to the shell? That's my question. The whole point of the radial bridge is no shell penetration. How does one attach a radial bridge at the top and bottom of a metal shell without penetrating the shell? If the radial bridges arent in a fixed position, they wont hold tension. Are they glued on?
 

Ransan

Senior Member
But how do they attach it to the shell? That's my question. The whole point of the radial bridge is no shell penetration. How does one attach a radial bridge at the top and bottom of a metal shell without penetrating the shell? If the radial bridges arent in a fixed position, they wont hold tension. Are they glued on?
Ah I see what your saying, maybe there is a cupping or a lip under the bridges to seat over edges?
My free floater has something like that on reso side only, that is the tension and seating chassis for the whole system.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Ah I see what your saying, maybe there is a cupping or a lip under the bridges to seat over edges?
My free floater has something like that on reso side only, that is the tension and seating chassis for the whole system.
Ooh could be a lip, that would work just fine. That's actually a really simple solution.
 

J-W

Well-known member
But how do they attach it to the shell? That's my question. The whole point of the radial bridge is no shell penetration. How does one attach a radial bridge at the top and bottom of a metal shell without penetrating the shell? If the radial bridges arent in a fixed position, they wont hold tension. Are they glued on?

The radial bridge is essentially a self contained, shell-less drum, meaning that it contains a place for the tension rods to attach ("lugs") and a bearing edge for the head to be tensioned against. All of the mechanisms to tension a head are contained in the bridge itself. The shell in this system doesn't have a (head) bearing edge, because it inserts inside a channel in the radial bridge (which contains the bearing edge). The shell is just a tube that sits between two, very shallow, tensioned drums, eliminating any tension on the shell material itself. The glue would only be necessary to prevent the shell from slipping out and to couple the three (2 radial bridges + shell) components to transfer the vibes.

In the case of the Radial Pro snare, the two bridges are "combined" (fab'd as double sided) to make the shell.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
The radial bridge is essentially a self contained, shell-less drum, meaning that it contains a place for the tension rods to attach ("lugs") and a bearing edge for the head to be tensioned against. All of the mechanisms to tension a head are contained in the bridge itself. The shell in this system doesn't have a (head) bearing edge, because it inserts inside a channel in the radial bridge (which contains the bearing edge). The shell is just a tube that sits between two, very shallow, tensioned drums, eliminating any tension on the shell material itself. The glue would only be necessary to prevent the shell from slipping out and to couple the three (2 radial bridges + shell) components to transfer the vibes.

In the case of the Radial Pro snare, the two bridges are "combined" (fab'd as double sided) to make the shell.
I get that, I mean specifically in Mugs Cains snare in the ad. It's a copper/brass/bronze looking drum with a white top and bottom bridge. If it's basically a radial bridge roto tom top and bottom with a shell in between, what keeps everything from falling apart when struck? In his particular snare, something has to keep the parts together.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
I get that, I mean specifically in Mugs Cains snare in the ad. It's a copper/brass/bronze looking drum with a white top and bottom bridge. If it's basically a radial bridge roto tom top and bottom with a shell in between, what keeps everything from falling apart when struck? In his particular snare, something has to keep the parts together.
Maybe top and bottom are independent chassis systems.

Good attention to detail MIP.

I would not even give this a second thought, I’d love to hear someone’s classified details lol with this type of UDO (unidentified drumming object)!
 

J-W

Well-known member
I get that, I mean specifically in Mugs Cains snare in the ad. It's a copper/brass/bronze looking drum with a white top and bottom bridge. If it's basically a radial bridge roto tom top and bottom with a shell in between, what keeps everything from falling apart when struck? In his particular snare, something has to keep the parts together.
My apologies. I read your quote as you thinking the bridge needed to be fastened to the shell in order to tension the head.

Glue (or epoxy) is what keeps the parts together.

The snare in Mugs Cain's ad is built exactly like their toms. Top and bottom bridge and shell in between. The only difference is the shell material. This concept could be done with any shell material, including acrylic.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Okay I get it now. I was just able to watch the video. I was initially under the impression the whole drum was milled as a single part, not just 1 bridge and bearing edge, thus my confusion with how they did it using a metal shell. I see now that they are 3 parts. Not sure how i feel about that.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Lest we forget this ad:
;)

View attachment 104570
I get the same vibe from Russ Miller's promotional material. :LOL:

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