Outdated instruments

Trigger

Senior Member
I saw someone post in another thread something along the lines of "outdated or not, I love my power toms" - Which I think is great. The passage of time and fads shouldn't influence how much you enjoy your instrument. However, it also got me thinking - Are other instruments affected by being "out of style" like drums are? I can't imagine many people caring what type of guitar you play at a gig - Maybe a warlock or a flying v would look out of place at some gigs, but overall it seems like drums are unfairly influenced by fads and the constant need to be "in fashion" with how they look.

Is it just me or does anyone else think this?
Is it just perspective bias because I know more about drums and drummers than any other instruments?
Am I just an elitist and do 99% of people not give a hoot about this?
 
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Suburbankidz

Active Member
When I was playing bass the local style on the bar gig scene was for a five string in a natural wood finish. I had (still have) a black late 1980s Fender Jazz Special four string, that was definitely NOT trendy. That bass sounded great and still sounds great. But it was not the cool looking bass to have at that time ( late 1990s)
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I saw someone post in another thread something along the lines of "outdated or not, I love my power toms" - Which I think is great. The passage of time and fads shouldn't influence how much you enjoy your instrument. However, it also got me thinking - Are other instruments affected by being "out of style" like drums are? I can't imagine many people caring what type of guitar you play at a gig - Maybe a warlock or a flying v would look out of place at some gigs, but overall it seems like drums are unfairly influenced by fads and the constant need to be "in fashion" with how they look.

Is it just me or does anyone else think this?
Is it just perspective bias because I know more about drums and drummers than any other instruments?
Am I just an elitist and do 99% of people not give a hoot about this?

For the question/concern about drums being unfairly influenced by fads and the constant need to be in fashion with how they look, I think that as music evolves, so does the look. I think drums continue to push the envelope in sizes, finishes, and features. The number 1 goal of drum manufacturers is to sell product. If they see a company succeeding with something, they will emulate it in some way. I've had my own preferences, and those have only changed slightly over the past 25+ years.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I play bass and drums, and I feel like the idea of "vintage" for sound is about the same in both worlds...I always hear about people wanting older drums/guitars for their sound

aesthetically, I do think that guitars and basses are more susceptible to choices there - re the pointy guitar thing - than drums b/c, over the years, other than some outlandish experiments like Trixon, North and Peavy drums, the drums themselves all look the same. I do see shell depth vs width sort of change with the times - power toms of the 80's; "standard" size toms of the 50's and 60's, that came back in the 2000 after power toms died out.

All of my drum purchases have always been for sound first, and looks second. I was lucky enough to be able to choose the look of most of my drum items as I ordered them new and custom

I did buy 2 basses for their looks. My 2000 Kramer Explorer bass, and a recent "gift" of a student level BC Rich Mockingbird bass. All of my other basses were purchased for sound and feel first
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I don't think that the audience knows what drums you play unless the brand name is on the bass drum head.

Yeah I imagine some audiences want big drums, 2 or 4 bass drums or whatever is fashionable. In the studio it's all about sound though.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I don't think that the audience knows what drums you play unless the brand name is on the bass drum head.

Yeah I imagine some audiences want big drums, 2 or 4 bass drums or whatever is fashionable. In the studio it's all about sound though.

I always thought that too, but pretty much every show I have ever played- from weddings to tractor pulls to retirement homes - someone comes up afterwards and talks drums with me. So I got into the mindset that I am "under the gun" at every show, and my gear needs to reflect that, as well as my playing
 

moodman

Well-known Member
I'm thinking only drummers would notice anachronistic tubs, though some drum kits might suggest a different era to someone who had watched tons of music videos.
 

s1212z

Silver Member
The Low Boy came back, I don't know why. For $200 you can go backwards in drum evolution. It would be like replacing all your cymbal stands with wire hook and rope.

The only thing I find useful is the ability to 'hi-hat' sitting-ish in Trilok Gurtu or in other percussion setups that are not drumset based and with a much easier travel. But with drumset, it's pretty dumb if you ask me.

Otherwise, play power toms if that is what someone loves and gets inspiration. But there are trends/fads that never stuck around for a reason.

 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
The Low Boy came back, I don't know why. For $200 you can go backwards in drum evolution. It would be like replacing all your cymbal stands with wire hook and rope.

The only thing I find useful is the ability to 'hi-hat' sitting-ish in Trilok Gurtu or in other percussion setups that are not drumset based and with a much easier travel. But with drumset, it's pretty dumb if you ask me.

Otherwise, play power toms if that is what someone loves and gets inspiration. But there are trends/fads that never stuck around for a reason.


I would use that in my brushes only jazz group in a second!!!
 

s1212z

Silver Member
I would use that in my brushes only jazz group in a second!!!
To each their own then, hopefully no one calls out for Birdland, lol

Hi hat stand portability is seriously lacking so I see some appeal. The only foldable hi hat stand I’m aware of is A&F’s and it is $300 and that crazy expensive.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
To each their own then, hopefully no one calls out for Birdland, lol

Hi hat stand portability is seriously lacking so I see some appeal. The only foldable hi hat stand I’m aware of is A&F’s and it is $300 and that crazy expensive.

no one would be calling for Birdland in that band...and it would fit the era of music we do...I would rather find an old one used honestly

but in reality, need to spend the money on other stuff, so it too, shall pass
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Marshall stacks.
I've yet to talk to a guitar player who used to haul twin cabinets around with a huge wattage head just to have the look on stage not love how loud smaller rigs are.
It's amazing how technology has marched on to make our stage lives easier.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
North and Staccato drums. Completely impractical and outdated but I can't think of anyone who wouldn't love to play them!

I'm finding most musicians are travelling lighter than ever thanks to technological advances and PA's being way better. My dad still has his old Orange from the 70s. He put castors on the bottom it's that heavy. I don't know how he lugged it about for as long as he did or his drummer who had a 9 piece Premier
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Marshall stacks.
I've yet to talk to a guitar player who used to haul twin cabinets around with a huge wattage head just to have the look on stage not love how loud smaller rigs are.
It's amazing how technology has marched on to make our stage lives easier.

I dunno. Sheer volume isn't what punches you in the chest. I'd never give up a pair of 4x12 cabs for a smaller rig. The look is an added benefit of guitar cabinets, but they're designed the way they are for a reason. Big, full sound and tone.
Ironically, the smaller the room, the more the stack makes a difference.

Now days people use virtual amps, or whatever they're calling the software, and it sounds incredible . . . . . until you realize there is ZERO pick attack.
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Marshall stacks.
I've yet to talk to a guitar player who used to haul twin cabinets around with a huge wattage head just to have the look on stage not love how loud smaller rigs are.
It's amazing how technology has marched on to make our stage lives easier.

funny that Marshall stacks have sort of gone out, but Orange amps have become en vogue...
 
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