OUR 'OTHER' DRUMS

Skulmoski

Gold Member
Here is my Indian Kanjira with a monitor lizzard skin. It is a pretty old Kanjira but in excellent condition (I would not have bought it if it was new since the monitor lizzard is an endangered species). The skin is exceptionally thin and when wet, it becomes very pliable so that you can "bend" the pitch the way a guitarist bends his strings.

GJS
 

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aydee

Platinum Member
Here is my Indian Kanjira with a monitor lizzard skin. It is a pretty old Kanjira but in excellent condition (I would not have bought it if it was new since the monitor lizzard is an endangered species). The skin is exceptionally thin and when wet, it becomes very pliable so that you can "bend" the pitch the way a guitarist bends his strings.

GJS
Where/how did you get a hold of this kanjira? I'd love to get one but my traditional indian connections don't go beyond Tablas and dholaks.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
[QUOTE}

Could someone tell me that this thing is called?

I really should stop referring to it as "That spinny thingy with the little doodads that hit the heads"
I know what it is.
It's called a tibetian temble drum.
Priests in Tibet use them when the do religious activities[/QUOTE]

It is also used by street performers in India as musical accompaniment to their schtik
 

wonder1

Senior Member


9"shell-less compact conga, cajon bass-drum, pedal-ring(Pedal tambourine),mini egg shaker,16" hand-drums, 6"mini djembe
 

jmanhughes

Member
Here's my cajon! I totally love this instrument because it emulates the kick and snare sounds so well. I play in an acoustic cover band on the weekends, and this is my main instrument.

 

Zickosdrummer

Senior Member
I know this is an old thread, but it's still on here, so here it goes.

Here a few of the "other" percussion instruments I have accumulataed over the years.

This is four sets of Water Buffalo bells. The hardest part of acquiring them was to get the water buffalos to hold still so I could get them off :).

drum picks 001.jpg

This is an accumulation of some of my non drum kit percussion ranging from dumbek (far left) to congas, bongos, concert toms, timbalis, various wood blocks, etc. I've used most of them in pit orchestra work (got tired of trying to borrow them). The concert toms are quite old and the next to largest is actually a 9-1/2". It needed a new head and I had to have one custom made by Remo. No one believed that this was the actual size untill I took it to find a head. I acquired these and all of the Ludwig drums from my retired college band director before he passed away.

One of the fun things about these is that none of the stands come out of my three drum sets so they don't interfere with the set up of any of them.

drum picks 004.jpg
 

Muckster

Platinum Member
I know what it is.
It's called a tibetian temble drum.
Priests in Tibet use them when the do religious activities

It is also used by street performers in India as musical accompaniment to their schtik
I've always heard them called Prayer drums. I picked one up at the Japanese pavillion at Epcot a few years ago. It's definately a favorite of mine.
 

beastdrummagirl

Senior Member
Here are my congas:
3.jpg
and my doumbek photo was too big to fit in this post so if you desperately wanna see my doumbek, go to my photo album labled "My Hot Stuff".
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Some Toca Bongo's. They're entry level and don't have the best sound, but they get the job done.



And my Remo 25x14 Djembe in a Nickel Silver Finish. This thing sounds awesome, the bass notes are huge, and they project very well, and the open notes and slaps, are clean and loud, with a wonderful tone.

 

simmsdn

Silver Member
Some of my collection of noise machinery, far from all of it!

Lots of cowbells, I've always been a fan of cowbells...the ago-ago looking bell is from Africa and you're only supposed to play the small bell, the large bell on it is only for battle!

I also have a thing for tambourines and maracas...and microphones, and snares, and and and...
 

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