Our brain

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Of course, this is not the first time I've heard of links between change of brain function and drumming, but this study just published, it is the first time I've read detail describing the mechanisms and affect. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/12/191209110513.htm?fbclid=IwAR2AzhEnXxkb9i137b-3ypv1jFtxb0F_8_F6JTMgwHCjswIk2adeVGdWuSU

This plays exactly into my personal experience with stroke recovery, especially my recognition of small deficiencies, and how I was able to conceptualise the difference between perception and reality of result.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
The psychiatrist I worked with after my brain injury was excited to hear I played drums and encouraged me to play as much as possible. My recovery was to have taken 6 months, but I was back at work in two. The doc said drums had the greatest impact to that timeline. Evidently, the information is well known, but not necessarily officially published.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
That's good to hear :)

What I found interesting here, is that although there's been an understanding of benefit in the past, this research proves it, describes the physical changes that make a difference, & why.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Just yesterday I heard an interview where they described how a violinist’s brain looks unique. A researcher studying Albert Einstein’s brain years after his death could tell that he had played violin just by the growth in certain areas.
 

rmac86

Member
I kind of know where you guys are coming from, I had a very bad viral infection 3 years ago that ultimately left me partially brain damaged. Drumming definitely helped with a quicker recovery and continued playing helps with my memory loss.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
My wife just showed me an article yesterday about dimentia and Alzheimer's. In the article it states (in a nutshell) that the musical part of our brain has more control over us than we think. They took patients who were basically lost in their own heads and played them music, and the recognition of the music temporarily brought them back to reality. I realize this is different than brain injury or stroke, but it's still quite amazing.

On a related note, I had a friend who played guitar and was in a horrible motorcycle accident. Drinking, no helmet, tree. He was in a coma for almost 5 months. When he woke up he was a completely different person until he played the guitar. Unfortunately the new person he became didn't care, and he ended up dying from a massive seizure because he refused to take his meds. But when he had a guitar in his hands...
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I think drumming is very therapeutic-I think the reason I started at 8 was self-medication. I had/have a lot of dyslexic traits as a kid (when I couldn't read well nor write in elementary school my Mom took me to lady who taught "phonics" and that got me reading well though still struggled in writing), I was a day dreamer till about 10th grade so I was a terrible student and math was just abstract. Oddly on testing I scored really high in math skills but I don't know how I do it because I don't understand it cognitively my brain sees math visually as relationships-if there is one I see it. I was a mediocre student and I'm sure no one thought I'd go to college, and because I was behind all my peers I was insecure. I had sensory processing issues and I was real clumsy in youth (I don't feel pain normally)- so I worked out with weights, took martial arts, ran, and I think drumming really helped with my motor memory and coordination in trying to accommodate. I think I was mainly dysgraphia with writing because I'm a great reader but it still takes me awhile to craft a well-written document to this day (I'll leave out words and letters so I was really proud to receive a writing award for a lobster paper). Given I got a BS, MS, and PhD most people would laugh "You don't have dyslexia!" but I started college in 1973 and finished in 1992-so an almost 20 year journey (though not continuously in school) so yes I'm slower than average but I still finished the race on top-I'm a tortoise not a hare. I've had friends in grad school and students with dyslexia and all have gone on to do well. Dyslexia has nothing to do with intelligence and it isn't seeing letter backwards but is a complex sensory processing disorder-so affects auditory and vision too and can manifest in unique ways in any individual. Drumming I think has been very therapeutic for me-it was a big boost in self-esteem in youth too.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It probably works playing any instrument, not just drumming.

However I do think that since all 4 limbs are involved it's better than just 2 limbs for the brain plasticity.

Drumming is probably the best musical brain therapy IMO.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I think drumming is very therapeutic-I think the reason I started at 8 was self-medication. I had/have a lot of dyslexic traits as a kid (when I couldn't read well nor write in elementary school my Mom took me to lady who taught "phonics" and that got me reading well though still struggled in writing), I was a day dreamer till about 10th grade so I was a terrible student and math was just abstract. Oddly on testing I scored really high in math skills but I don't know how I do it because I don't understand it cognitively my brain sees math visually as relationships-if there is one I see it. I was a mediocre student and I'm sure no one thought I'd go to college, and because I was behind all my peers I was insecure. I had sensory processing issues and I was real clumsy in youth (I don't feel pain normally)- so I worked out with weights, took martial arts, ran, and I think drumming really helped with my motor memory and coordination in trying to accommodate. I think I was mainly dysgraphia with writing because I'm a great reader but it still takes me awhile to craft a well-written document to this day (I'll leave out words and letters so I was really proud to receive a writing award for a lobster paper). Given I got a BS, MS, and PhD most people would laugh "You don't have dyslexia!" but I started college in 1973 and finished in 1992-so an almost 20 year journey (though not continuously in school) so yes I'm slower than average but I still finished the race on top-I'm a tortoise not a hare. I've had friends in grad school and students with dyslexia and all have gone on to do well. Dyslexia has nothing to do with intelligence and it isn't seeing letter backwards but is a complex sensory processing disorder-so affects auditory and vision too and can manifest in unique ways in any individual. Drumming I think has been very therapeutic for me-it was a big boost in self-esteem in youth too.
other than the PhD, this was me exactly....and drumming definitely helped with my focus, organization, and ESPECIALLY motivation skills.
If one of my teachers could relate a topic I was not interested in to drumming, it was like instant focus and success.

I have been teaching drumming/band for 25+ years now, and have seen music/drumming/band really help MANY kids deal with ADHD, many different Autistic tendencies, learning disabilities etc. I can think of 2 specific students of mine who came into the program suffering from very severe social and interactive issues due to Autism, and by their senior year, they were completely different. The regimented practice to develop our skill set really helped them flourish in many aspects or their lives. One just got his pilots license and is also an electrical engineer...the other became a priest.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
It probably works playing any instrument, not just drumming.

However I do think that since all 4 limbs are involved it's better than just 2 limbs for the brain plasticity.

Drumming is probably the best musical brain therapy IMO.
And I think linear drumming is the best of all for your brain. It’s the only activity I can think of where all 4 of your limbs purposely don’t work in unison. Doing linear drumming probably makes all kind of new brain pathways, is my guess.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
When I retired, I found, and therefore surmised, that humans needed something to keep the brain going since not doing the same routine pre- retirement. I found that we needed 2 activities two satisfy this need. One small muscle activity, and one large muscle activity. This not based on science but only my own observation. I use drumming for my large muscle activity, and my woodworking hobby for the small muscle activity. There are times when there is a crossover, but mainly this idea works for me. Small keeps your brain functioning on things like design, measuring, planning etc. Large, drumming, keeps you moving most of your body to keep the joints loose. Just my thoughts. Actually, just the thought of this idea kept my grain working.
 

TMe

Senior Member
...I'm slower than average but I still finished the race on top-I'm a tortoise not a hare.
There's a story where Arthur C. Clark introduces a character by saying he "wasn't stupid, he was just slow." Then he describes a character who's quite brilliant, but not a quick thinker. I've always loved that line. (The character ends up saving the day.)
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
When I retired, I found, and therefore surmised, that humans needed something to keep the brain going since not doing the same routine pre- retirement. I found that we needed 2 activities two satisfy this need. One small muscle activity, and one large muscle activity. This not based on science but only my own observation. I use drumming for my large muscle activity, and my woodworking hobby for the small muscle activity. There are times when there is a crossover, but mainly this idea works for me. Small keeps your brain functioning on things like design, measuring, planning etc. Large, drumming, keeps you moving most of your body to keep the joints loose. Just my thoughts. Actually, just the thought of this idea kept my grain working.
I can definitely see this as being a thing....I know that as I get older, my drumming, hockey and mountain biking will be my big muscle thing. My small muscle thing will be be model railroading as I get out all of my old train set stuff and set it back up once the kids are out of the house.

I have noticed with my dad, as he retired years ago, also kept these 2 types of activity going, until his health kept him from doing the big muscle thing. When that happened, I noticed that he started to experience the effects of Alzheimers...I can see now that that was possibly part of it
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I kind of know where you guys are coming from, I had a very bad viral infection 3 years ago that ultimately left me partially brain damaged.
That sounds hideous! I hope you're recovered to an acceptable degree.


Guys, I'm enjoying reading all your well thought out and insightful responses - then there's this vvvvvvvvv
They say you get better results if you play Mapex Saturns.
Dammit!! Why didn't I think of that? I should have trashed my shitty tubs & snagged Saturns - I'd have eclipsed Vinnie by now 🤣


and Zildjian cymbals :cool:
You're just encouraging him, aren't you :rolleyes:
 
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