Other drummer's bad/nasty/uncomfortable drum sets!

Migaluch

Senior Member
I just feel i need to rant a little bit here. What is it about playing other people's kits that is just so annoying? I have been playing for just under two years, but i have my share of playing other people's drum sets and i just can't stand playing on a kit that is set up awkwardly, is in poor condition, or is generally unplayable. I perform for my school's Jazz Band and wherever we perform, the kits are in poor condition or are just awkwardly set up. I don't mean to sound too picky, but i just can't play my best on a kit i am not familiar with. Does anyone else feel the same way? The only drum set that i feel comfortable and that i can play my best on is my own...
 

Pkaneps

Senior Member
I know A LOT of drummers feel this way, but I just don't. I have a one up two down single kick kit with hats, a crash and a ride, and I've had to play on other kits (my old band's bass player was a drummer, I used his kit for practice there) but it never REALLY bothered me. I might have to make an adjustment or two, but other than that, it's not a problem. I kind of like playing other people's kits.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Long ago I learned to just sit down and play. If you cant adapt and make someone else's gear work then you need to get more playing experience under your belt. When sitting behind someone else's kit, tell yourself, I am only here for 40 minutes (or however long your set is) and the inconvenience and extra effort required to adapt will equal a mouse's fart in the big scheme of things.
 

wsabol

Gold Member
I have the same problem.. I can't play on weird kits. I tried to play a jazz gig on somebody's 3 piece with no rack tom. It was bad, lol. I was reaching, and missing, that rack tom all night.

Now, whenever I have to play on someones kit, I get cocky and move all their crap around. That might be kind of doochey, but I expect no less from them if they were playing on my kit.
 
S

sticks4drums

Guest
I have to agree with the OP. I am never more comfortable than on my own kit. Yes I can play others, but it does feel awkward. As an example, my buddy has his snare slightly tilted away from him, and I have mine slightly tilted towards me. I hit the rim all the time on his kit. It is almost unplayable for me. No fun anyways. :)
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Long ago I learned to just sit down and play. If you cant adapt and make someone else's gear work then you need to get more playing experience under your belt. When sitting behind someone else's kit, tell yourself, I am only here for 40 minutes (or however long your set is) and the inconvenience and extra effort required to adapt will equal a mouse's fart in the big scheme of things.
That's my take on it. I've been lucky. I haven't had to do it that often, but enough to know that whilst I'd rather play my kit, it's easy enough to grin and bear it.

Just keep it simple and lay down a groove. Save the flash until you've felt the kit out.
 

dwdrummerky

Senior Member
Only time I have any problem with playing someones kit is if they are uber lowrider kits with the snare drum positioned as low as possible with the throne the same way, or when things are sky high. Usually I can get by on whatever, but I have experienced some odd configurations that are not ergonomic & difficult to use proper technique to play.
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
Yes, it can be a bother but as others here have already said, I learned to just bear with it, nowadays it's not that big of a deal for me but every once in a while you get a kit that's so worn down and crappy that makes you wish you could bring your own kit to every gig.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I guess I don't take myself quite that seriously. I have fun on any kit as long as it's not falling apart.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
I've got used to this, but given that I'm usually playing quite demanding music it can be very difficult if certain elements aren't set up properly. Throne height is a big one of these.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
When you're presented with a kit you can't do much to, ask yourself this: are you playing the kit, or is the kit playing you?
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
More than any other instrument, drum sets are customized for each person's body.

Substitute "wearing someone else's shoes" with "playing someone else's set" and you will understand better. Agreed, we aren't much in the habit of wearing others' shoes but I hope you get my point.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I used to feel the same way. I eventually got over it. I saw the different setups/angles/qualities/conditions of the different sets as a challenge to myself to not let something as trivial as not having my own kit to play on get in the way of making music. Now, I don't mind much any more. Sure, I prefer my own kit, and sometimes you run across that concert tom kit with worn-out hydraulic heads (that you can't see through the pillow that's been duct taped to the head), but it's just for that gig--that fleeting moment in time. Make the best with what you have where you are...
 

Pimento

Senior Member
Well, i used to be this way, until i realized that ameture shows and open mic nights dotn have a setup time :)

So as i went along i learned to just deal with what i was given, i always bring my pedal, sticks, a few choice cymbals that go with the music and my snare....the pedals are the one thing i make sure i have because i have them dialed in just perfectly for me, the cymbals i can give and take on, and the sticks and snare are a courtesy thing so that im not beating up someone elses gear :)

Other than that, ive had to go from playing metal on my 6 piece kit, to a 4 piece kit, up to an 8 piece kit. I am much better at playing odd set ups, and took away some things to make mine more comfortable at home :)
 

Witterings

Silver Member
I used to absolutely hate it and especially struggled with older style deeper toms and getting them into a position that I didn't feel like it was totally un-natural holding my arms high in the air. It was even worse when I only had an e-kit as everything was so close playing and acoustic kit in comparison EVERYTHING seemed so far away.

Over the last few years though I've spent a lot of time at open mic nights, various gigs with a drum kit supplied, joined another band where I sometimes use their e-kit for practices, and have had a few different kits myself so am constantly going from one to another and it's made it an aweful lot easier and made me less uncomfortable playing someone else's kit.

Don't get me wrong it's NEVER the same as sitting behind your own kit but it helps
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
In those situations I use as much of my stuff as I can get away with: throne, snare, bass pedal, cymbals, and ,yes, toms. No sound man is going to care if you use a your own throne, and it only takes seconds to put the first one back. Peace and goodwill.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Sure, I'd like to have my kit whenever possible, but there are times when it's just not possible.

I've played other kits often enough that I'm used to it. Whatever, give me a drum and I'll hit it.
 

DumDrum

Member
Don't really mind the drums set up differently, I can adjust to that easily enough... i just really can't play on a lot of other people's pedals... It just feels wrong to me, so i always bring my own pedals and sticks no matter what
 
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