Original songs and the drummers expertise

stevo

Senior Member
For all you drummers in original bands: How often has someone brought a song(s) to the band, as you listen to them, you notice there is no timing pattern to them? The song, as an example, might be counted in 4/4, but the intro might go 5,6 bars,as an example, then the verse may have go on forever before it goes into a chorus, which again does not fit into a particular timing pattern. So, maybe even though they have written a good song, it isn't in a particular pattern. So do you the drummer, write it down in a standard timing pattern for them so they understand where they may have gone off at?
And, as a question, how many song writers have to have help with this, or, does a good song writer inherently understand this?
 

Joe P

Senior Member
You mean song form. And yes, people should know how to construct a song in standard form with pre-verse, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, breakdown, chorus, etc.

And most song sections are in 8 bar groupings (or 12 bars such as in blues and some jazz)
 

Trip McNealy

Gold Member
Quite honestly, the songwriter in our band does a great job of constructing songs. He always has verses, bridges, choruses, etc laid out and with structure.

One thing we all love to do is jam out the songs (particularly towards the end), so sometimes we have to bring the song back "down to earth" and try to contain ourselves :)
 

westicle

Senior Member
You mean song form. And yes, people should know how to construct a song in standard form with pre-verse, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, breakdown, chorus, etc.

And most song sections are in 8 bar groupings (or 12 bars such as in blues and some jazz)
I couldn't disagree more. I can't listen to regular pop radio because the songs are all based on the same formula. It's so bring and predictable. Don't get me wrong, I do like a bit of pop every now and then but to say all musicians should know how to write to this formula...well I guess I just disagree.
 

westicle

Senior Member
For all you drummers in original bands: How often has someone brought a song(s) to the band, as you listen to them, you notice there is no timing pattern to them? The song, as an example, might be counted in 4/4, but the intro might go 5,6 bars,as an example, then the verse may have go on forever before it goes into a chorus, which again does not fit into a particular timing pattern. So, maybe even though they have written a good song, it isn't in a particular pattern. So do you the drummer, write it down in a standard timing pattern for them so they understand where they may have gone off at?
And, as a question, how many song writers have to have help with this, or, does a good song writer inherently understand this?
I have had something similar in the past. One of the guys in my old band used to write some really cool riffs but his timing was terrible. He would over emphasise the different notes and hooks of the riff (to get the feel and mood across) by playing harder/speeding up/slowing down. I was playing guitar at the time and I would have to basically quantize the riffs so I could play them.
 

Drumsword

Pioneer Member
I write music and usually have the structure pretty close to complete when I give it to my guitarist. He usually hones and fine tunes it, tweaks something here or changes a part of the bridge there, and often times the intro will get completely changed or lengthened, shortened, added to etc., in the studio.

It certainly is nice when someone writes a song and nothing needs changing, we just need to create or learn our parts. But often guys will come in with fragments of songs and we need to piece them together and create parts to make them flow.

Sadly a lot of music on the radio sounds like it was mass produced by a cookie cutter, all sounds the same and so much could be added to make the song more original. Not ALL of it, but a fair share.
 
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