Opinions on Pearl Maple Free Floating Snare.

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Okay...how can I know if the one in the pic is new or the older model?
The one in the pic is a newer drum.......or at any rate it is not a first gen. FF. Note the round lugs.

The first generation lugs are like the ones in Les' pics. But I can't see the strainer mechanism in your pic. Ask the seller if the wires extend past the shell (as per Les's pic). Or if they just look like this one: http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=pearl+free+floating+snare&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1173&bih=803&tbm=isch&tbnid=Od5IvZ3J5v0LVM:&imgrefurl=http://www.pearldrum.com/Products/Snares/Free-Floating/Maple.aspx&docid=6mxpoT8qGVykuM&imgurl=http://www.pearldrum.com/art/snares/free_floating/maple1thumb.jpg&w=700&h=400&ei=CMupT6SEGeXjmAWgyMnhBA&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=360&sig=114375268358170285724&page=1&tbnh=124&tbnw=217&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:72&tx=112&ty=45
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
Ist generation has square tube lugs and the rollers on the strainer/but are spring loaded.

.........................
I see.

The one in the pic is a newer drum.......or at any rate it is not a first gen. FF. Note the round lugs.

The first generation lugs are like the ones in Les' pics. But I can't see the strainer mechanism in your pic. Ask the seller if the wires extend past the shell (as per Les's pic). Or if they just look like this one: http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=pearl+free+floating+snare&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1173&bih=803&tbm=isch&tbnid=Od5IvZ3J5v0LVM:&imgrefurl=http://www.pearldrum.com/Products/Snares/Free-Floating/Maple.aspx&docid=6mxpoT8qGVykuM&imgurl=http://www.pearldrum.com/art/snares/free_floating/maple1thumb.jpg&w=700&h=400&ei=CMupT6SEGeXjmAWgyMnhBA&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=360&sig=114375268358170285724&page=1&tbnh=124&tbnw=217&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:72&tx=112&ty=45
Okay will do it!
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
I have this exact drum. It's great! I use it a lot for gigs.

Wide tuning range, warm sound but a nice crack. I use a coated ambassador on top and ambassador snare side. (not very imaginative, but it doesn't need much to sound good). Tune it with bottom a little tighter (about a third higher) than the top. It's a great all-round drum.

I have never swapped out the shell, I just love it as it is!

As with any drum or cymbal, just make sure you hear what it sounds like before you buy it.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
I have this exact drum. It's great! I use it a lot for gigs.

Wide tuning range, warm sound but a nice crack. I use a coated ambassador on top and ambassador snare side. (not very imaginative, but it doesn't need much to sound good). Tune it with bottom a little tighter (about a third higher) than the top. It's a great all-round drum.

I have never swapped out the shell, I just love it as it is!

As with any drum or cymbal, just make sure you hear what it sounds like before you buy it.

Thanks for the opinion!
 

moqsweb51

Junior Member
I just got the brass 14 x 6.5 version for xmas.
Out of the box it sounded great.
I will replace the head later, but for now, the snare sounds great.
Turn off the snare wires and listen to the tonal quality, it is remarkable.
I think that saying one snare is better than another is ridiculous.
There are many great snares out there, so there are many great snares to use for different applications. It is clearly subjective to personal taste. Some drummers prefer specific brands, some don't. Some prefer certain hardware, others mix and match. Some drummers like using different cymbals in the same kit. Who cares? Enjoy the free floating technology and use your own judgement when you trry one at a store near your location.
I love mine and will find joy in it's originality and character.



I have the 14 x 6.5 version. It has been my main snare for 15 years. The drum is as he describes. The die cast hoops allow this drum to cut tremendously with that maple shell. I've gotten compliments on it many times. I know another drummer that has been gigging for about the same 15 years and has only ever owned that snare. And the reason is, it works. He's told me many stories of people complimenting his snare sound.

I play aggressive music. He plays rock.

You can also get Pearl to make you a brass shell. It takes 3-6 months as they aren't a stock item anymore, but you can replace the maple shell with the brass one. I just got mine for $120. Looks sick. So for a little more, you can also have two drums in one.

I haven't had a chance to hook up the new brass shell, but I'm confident that shell is going to add just the right amount of ring to that already cutting sound.

I expect you'll love the drum.

ps. I've often used an Evans Genera HD dry head on it. That head is 2 plys for heavy duty hitting and dries the drum out some. So if you want to take more advantage of the resonance of that maple shell, you probably don't want to use that head. But if you do, that head on that drum (with those die cast hoops) will make it a focused snare drum sound that cuts through anything.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
The disadvantage is that the aluminum frame dries out whatever the shell is
True, & makes the semi free floating feature a bit of a nonsense to be honest. That said, I'm a fan. For the money (especially used), it's one of the best built snares out there, especially if you like die cast hoops. One feature that isn't useless though, is the 16" wire on earlier models. That really works well, & IMO, mostly accounts for it's volume reputation (less choking of the reso head). I've no idea why they dropped the 16" wire feature :(
 

Dirtcity

Member
I have one of the maple piccolo free floaters. I actually am trying to sell it, but for a while it was actually my main snare.

I'll echo all the comments in here though. Bright, cutting pop. Rim shots on that thing were gunshots. I always found it to be very articulate, probably due to the aluminum frame drying out the sound. And as a shallow drum, great snare response in my opinion.

Great drums.
 

barryabko

Senior Member
I have a number of Pearl FF drums with various depths (3.5" to 14") and shells made of various materials - some Pearl brand: maple, brass, copper and some aftermarket: custom stave Bubinga, beech, birch, etc. Each shell material has its own particular sonic personality and some (such as brass) are significantly louder than others. I really like the FF design, in particular the ability to exchange the shells and the extended snare wires.
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
I have a number of Pearl FF drums with various depths (3.5" to 14") and shells made of various materials - some Pearl brand: maple, brass, copper and some aftermarket: custom stave Bubinga, beech, birch, etc. Each shell material has its own particular sonic personality and some (such as brass) are significantly louder than others. I really like the FF design, in particular the ability to exchange the shells and the extended snare wires.
This. That is exactly why Pearl's FF snares are the best option for the money. So interchangeable. You can swap the shell for most other ply woods, staves, and wood types. You can swap out the lugs from a 6.5" to a 5" and even a 3.5".

I just recently cleaned all my tension rods and greased 'em up with some white lithium grease. Swapped the heads out and the snare sounds (and looks) clean as hell. Deinfitey different characteristics compared to my Velvetone.
 

JesusMySavior

Silver Member
I own a shallow shelled free floater. It's 5" x 14". It's got air vents drilled into the side. It has a very dry, sharp, loud woody crack to it. Sounds phenomenal. Still not my favorite though - that spot belongs to my Musashi. But I am recording my new album with the free floater entirely (with the exception of 1 or 2 songs) so I'm excited to hear how nice that thing will sound once I get the album mixed.
 
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