Opinions: 13x3 steel vs 12x7 maple as main

Call me a dork, but where is the difference? From what I hear in the sample videos, they all do exactly what a 14'' can do sonically. Isn't it more the way a small diameter snare drum feels under your sticks? I always was a 14" guy in order to have enough space for my rather poor brush sweeping. But whenever I hit a 13 inch drum with a pair of sticks, I really liked the feel in terms of rebound. The only 12" snare I ever played was tuned way up as a side effect, so that probably doesn't count.
Well, I could think of space issues for guys that use more than three pedals. To use just my double pedal I never had problems to find a comfy setup with my 14" snares between my legs.
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
I used a Pearl 3x13 steel snare for alt country rock gigs, and it worked. I recall Dave Lombardo used 7x12 snare with Slayer, I think?
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Call me a dork,
Dork. :D J/j. I love your username!


...where is the difference? From what I hear in the sample videos, they all do exactly what a 14'' can do sonically. Isn't it more the way a small diameter snare drum feels under your sticks? I always was a 14" guy in order to have enough space for my rather poor brush sweeping. But whenever I hit a 13 inch drum with a pair of sticks, I really liked the feel in terms of rebound. The only 12" snare I ever played was tuned way up as a side effect, so that probably doesn't count.
Well, I could think of space issues for guys that use more than three pedals. To use just my double pedal I never had problems to find a comfy setup with my 14" snares between my legs.
Well, they overlap a bit, but no, not 100% identical sonically, otherwise there would be no need for 13" and 12" snare drums. A 13 can get a bit higher pitched but not quite as low pitched as a 14; 13 to 12 has the same relationship, etc. "The only 12" snare I ever played was tuned way up as a side effect"- because it was easier for that drum to get there than forcing a 14 into it, eh? And re: rebound- I think that has more to do with head tension than the size of the drum.
 

roncadillac

Member
Dork. :D J/j. I love your username!



Well, they overlap a bit, but no, not 100% identical sonically, otherwise there would be no need for 13" and 12" snare drums. A 13 can get a bit higher pitched but not quite as low pitched as a 14; 13 to 12 has the same relationship, etc. "The only 12" snare I ever played was tuned way up as a side effect"- because it was easier for that drum to get there than forcing a 14 into it, eh? And re: rebound- I think that has more to do with head tension than the size of the drum.
Funny part is I've always preferred a side/effect snare to be tuned lower and fatter then my primary snare. I prefer a 12-13 main tuned higher and the side to be a 14 tuned lower (not that I ever really use one anyway).
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Funny part is I've always preferred a side/effect snare to be tuned lower and fatter then my primary snare. I prefer a 12-13 main tuned higher and the side to be a 14 tuned lower (not that I ever really use one anyway).
I've seen that some also. Mike Lowry from Lake Trout used both for 3 total, mimicing the various sampled snare sounds from the EDM/Drum & Bass music that their music was partially inspired by.
 

roncadillac

Member
Update: I ended up going with the pearl 13x3 steel piccolo. I wanted a different voice then my current snare and had the opportunity to play on two different 12" wood snares right next to the Pearl 13" piccolo and the 12's were just not different enough from my current snare sound to justify almost $200. The pearl piccolo was a separate voice that fills the exact purpose I was looking for.

If I need a warm 'belly' sound I've got my 13" wood and for a more lively driving crack I've got the 13" steel piccolo. Both match my kit, both fit into the bag set it came with, I can use either or both without any difference in my setup/breakdown SOP.

Thanks for everyone's help and advice!
 
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