Online music stores "My Rant!"

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
you decide to advertise XYZ's products under MAP. You advertise lower and they cut you off, now you sell nothing. Work your deals, just don't advertise them.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
MAP is so the smaller guy doesn't have to compete with the bigger guy with more buying power.
The advertised price is the same. Buy wherever your politics make you feel smug.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
... I remember seeing a cast aluminum chum grinder for the back of the boat which cost $112.00. That same grinder your mom uses to make ham salad is $29.00.
I want one for my drumset! ; )...guess it would retail around $300 USD....but the sound!!! <<DUUUUHHH DUHHHN....dun dun dun dun >>
(attempt at JAWS shark approaching music)
 

nolibos

Well-known member
I’m always happy when a retail store front closes. I prefer trees. My dream is all retail is done from warehouses below ground and our country look like it did in 1700.
Quite a dream I know, but wouldn’t it be beautiful?

Could we call the people that work in these underground warehouses "Morlocks"?
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I’m always happy when a retail store front closes. I prefer trees. My dream is all retail is done from warehouses below ground and our country look like it did in 1700.
Quite a dream I know, but wouldn’t it be beautiful?

Could we call the people that work in these underground warehouses "Morlocks"?
Robots will be stocking and boxing of course and the manufacturing will be done in North Dakota which is currently vacant.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I don’t understand “selling under MAP” though. The retailer is buying the product from the manufacturer at a certain price, selling under MAP would mean the retailer is making less profit to survive. Why are you in business other than to make a profit? I’m sure stores do it, but they either make up for it with other products or they’re not doing it for long, or they begin to go out of business, right?
 

Destroyer772

Gold Member
I'd like to set one thing straight...laziness isn't the only reason to order online. Geography plays a part.

There are a significant number of musicians like myself living in rural settings, where there is no 'local' music shop. I have to drive for a minimum of 45 minutes to get to a music store. With so many online resources offering competitive pricing and, often, free shipping, I'd be crazy to make that trip. I take five minutes online, order what I need, and a few days later it's waiting for me when I come home from work.

Offhand, I'd say that the problem is one of efficiency. They've made online ordering TOO efficient...it's seductive.
I feel you there brother !, I would have to travel 120+ miles round trip to get to my closest drum shop. Even if they match online prices, gas money would break me. I laid down $3400 to this shop when I got my Saturn V and hardware. Then I bought a single pedal speed cobra online at a great price and decided I liked it and wanted a double. I took it up there to swap it, they grilled me about where I got it and acted insulted that I didn't purchase the single from them. I said the hell with this and walked out.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
to get to a proper drum store i have to travel at least two hours by train to a major city, we have a shop in my hometown but they're guitar-orientated and have a very small drum section, with nearly all of it being low to mid range gear.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I don’t understand “selling under MAP” though. The retailer is buying the product from the manufacturer at a certain price, selling under MAP would mean the retailer is making less profit to survive. Why are you in business other than to make a profit? I’m sure stores do it, but they either make up for it with other products or they’re not doing it for long, or they begin to go out of business, right?
Just math.
If a unit has a MAP of $100 and a cost of $70 and a store sells the item for $90 which earns them 10 sales vs. the store selling at MAP who earns only 3 sales then they profited $200 vs. $90.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Just a reminder Minimum Advertised Price (MAP) has nothing to do w/ a dealer's cost. Dealer's cost is often a calculation/percentage of MSRP (manufacturer's suggested retail price).
 
Sweetwater is a privately owned corporation, owned by founder Chuck Surack. GC and MF merged in 1999. Bain Capitol bought out GC and thus it's subsidiaries in 2007.

So no, they aren't the same company.

Businesses must adhere to MAP. This is why the prices are all the same across the board. It the law. They can sell at whatever price they want, just not advertise. It's not illegal or price fixing.

Internet is king and people are lazy. Who wants to go to the store when the store can come to you?

Companies are in business to make money, not make you happy.
I disagree that it's being lazy. I think for person to walk into a store without knowing the market price for something is stupid. You wouldn't buy a car from a dealer and pay the window price without knowing what the competition is selling it for. I think brick and mortar stores need to adapt, have an online presence, know the going rate for gear so that they can compete [in some way] with the giants in the game. I'm 1005 for supporting my local drum shop but I'm not going to pay $40 more for cymbal or $250 more for a drum kit just to be a nice guy.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I disagree that it's being lazy.
My wife is a personal shopper part time. She grocery shops for people. When someone who lives a half mile from the store orders 2 things then wants them delivered, that is lazy. Not elderly people. Not sick people. Able bodied 30 something's who just want chips and soda. The internet generation. Yeah, they are lazy.

I think for person to walk into a store without knowing the market price for something is stupid. You wouldn't buy a car from a dealer and pay the window price without knowing what the competition is selling it for.
So before the internet, how did one know the price of what they wanted? Music stores didn't take out ads in the Sunday paper. One went to the store and found out how much stuff cost. We don't have to now.

Financial institutions for car dealerships base how much your loan will be and it's terms based on your credit and income. They don't want someone who has perfect credit and a $100,000 a year income. They don't make as much money from that person as they will from the person with poor credit that needs a lower payment over a longer period of time with a much higher interest rate. It doesn't really matter what others have paid for the same car unless they have the same income and credit score. And dealerships in bigger cities that have a higher volume of traffic and larger inventory will be able to sell more cars for less money because of their economic location. So going to the dealership and crying to the salesman that Bob got $1500 off sticker price of the same car doesn't mean you will too. Especially if Bob makes $100,000 a year and has a 900 credit score.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
The major downside for me with the idea of shopping for musical instrument gear online is you have better know exactly what you need. There is little to no knowledgeable customer service with those major chain stores mentioned. At the traditional local shop run by a drummer where they offered lessons by a working drummer, other guys would come in and questions would be asked and ideas could be bounced off each other.

The OP simply needs to understand the realities of how this fairly new economy works.
Welcome to the 21st century ya'll, I wish we could sign a petition or something to go back in time.
This!

I have 2 small, independent shops here in town, but their drum section is small as they have to offer everything else. Sure, they can order it, but so can I and it's shipped free. I will go to these places first though & if they have what I want, I'll buy from them. Sticks are huge for me to try out first & most shops will price match.

My Sales Engineer at Sweetwater will call me personally and help me find what I'm looking for even if it's not listed on the site. Something Guitar Sucker, Sam Ass and Musician's Fraud would never do.
And good luck finding a drum guy in any of those brick and mortar stores. If they do have one, they're gone in less than a month thanks to bad management.

Online is sadly, the way of the world no matter the product. Brick and mortar just can't compete with the abundant level stock & free shipping. Not to mention overhead and other business costs the big corporations don't have to deal with.

I'll still shop as local as I can for what I need, but in the end, I'm expecting the sad day I pull up to my local shop and the door is locked. :cry:
 
My wife is a personal shopper part time. She grocery shops for people. When someone who lives a half mile from the store orders 2 things then wants them delivered, that is lazy. Not elderly people. Not sick people. Able bodied 30 something's who just want chips and soda. The internet generation. Yeah, they are lazy.



So before the internet, how did one know the price of what they wanted? Music stores didn't take out ads in the Sunday paper. One went to the store and found out how much stuff cost. We don't have to now.

Financial institutions for car dealerships base how much your loan will be and it's terms based on your credit and income. They don't want someone who has perfect credit and a $100,000 a year income. They don't make as much money from that person as they will from the person with poor credit that needs a lower payment over a longer period of time with a much higher interest rate. It doesn't really matter what others have paid for the same car unless they have the same income and credit score. And dealerships in bigger cities that have a higher volume of traffic and larger inventory will be able to sell more cars for less money because of their economic location. So going to the dealership and crying to the salesman that Bob got $1500 off sticker price of the same car doesn't mean you will too. Especially if Bob makes $100,000 a year and has a 900 credit score.

You couldn't, unless you called around. But now you can with the internet so why wouldn't you use that information?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
You couldn't, unless you called around. But now you can with the internet so why wouldn't you use that information?
Yes, but when you called around you still have to go to the store. That isn't necessary any more. Why would I want to look up said information, then get dressed and drive to a store that might not be able to match/beat that price? Wasted time and gas. Or I could just "add to cart" and do something else with my day. Like watch TV. Lazy.
 
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