One of the 40 rudiments called "Lesson 25", where are the other lessons?

Dizeee

Senior Member
Back when our tribal ancestors were dancing round camp fires and sharpening sticks to hunt with, there were a variety of initiation and competence tests that would be used to measure the younger members suitability for progress on to the higher ranks of the tribal society.

There were many tests involving physical mental and practical challenges. One of these was time keeping and coordination involving the ability to keep a beat going on a skinned drum around the camp fire whilst members of the tribe danced and carried out their social duties. This was the 25th lesson of a total of 36 undertaken as part of this initiative.

The pattern of beats played were set and continued to be used until today whereby they are still used as the rudiment we all know and love. Hence Lesson 25.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
The lesson 25 was one of the patterns chosen to take part in the 26 American Drum Rudiments by members of the National Association of Rudimental Drummers (N.A.R.D.) in 1936. The 26 drum rudiments where put together with the objective of establishing a set of drum rudiments - each of which with a particular accent or dynamic interpretation - within which contest snare drumming could be properly evaluated all over the United States. The drum rudiments, from which the 26 drum rudiments were chosen, were taken from the six most important method books published throughout the 19th century and early 20th century.

One of those books was Gardiner A. Strube's "Drum and Fife Instructor" (1869). The book contained twenty-five lessons - each of which featured a given drum rudiment. The drum rudiment on lesson 25 was chosen as one of the 26 drum rudiments. Since it lacked an official name, N.A.R.D. decided to name it lesson 25. In 1984, the 26 drum rudiments were joined by 14 other drum rudiments, giving birth to the 40 International Drum Rudiments.
Damnedest thing I've ever seen: an actual piece of scholarly information on a Drumeo site.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Back when our tribal ancestors were dancing round camp fires and sharpening sticks to hunt with, there were a variety of initiation and competence tests that would be used to measure the younger members suitability for progress on to the higher ranks of the tribal society.

There were many tests involving physical mental and practical challenges. One of these was time keeping and coordination involving the ability to keep a beat going on a skinned drum around the camp fire whilst members of the tribe danced and carried out their social duties. This was the 25th lesson of a total of 36 undertaken as part of this initiative.

The pattern of beats played were set and continued to be used until today whereby they are still used as the rudiment we all know and love. Hence Lesson 25.
This is way better than the smartass answer I considered
 

Dizeee

Senior Member
Ha... I was hoping it may have been considered the answer... unfortunately Google is too efficient.
 

tcspears

Gold Member
Gardiner A. Strube's "Drum and Fife Instructor" (1869). The book contained twenty-five lessons - each of which featured a given drum rudiment. The drum rudiment on lesson 25 was chosen as one of the 26 drum rudiments. Since it lacked an official name, N.A.R.D. decided to name it lesson 25.
As someone that started out with Fife and Drum music, this book was indispensable for me learning how to play the snare drum.
 

Jake943

Member
Crap. I just thought it meant 25th rudiment (which it isn't) I was just too lazy too count up the rudiments.
 
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